Touro University TESOL Candidate Bianca Soto-King’s Reflections on her Fieldwork Experience in EDPN 673

EDPN 673 Methods and Materials for Teaching English as a Second Language

This course provides a historical overview of second language acquisition theories and teaching methods. Students learn how to apply current approaches, methods and techniques, with attention to the effective use of materials, in teaching English as a second language. Students will engage in the planning and implementation of standards-based ESL instruction which includes differentiated learning experiences geared to students’ needs. Emphasis is placed on creating culturally responsive learning environments. Includes 15 hours of fieldwork.

Bianca Soto-King is an NYC Public School teacher who currently works in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn. She teaches 6th grade ELA and is completing her master’s degree in TESOL at Touro University. She is a native Brooklynite and a lover of all things literary.

During my fieldwork hours, I learned how to plan standards-based ESL instruction and how to implement differentiated learning experiences in order to meet my students’ needs. By observing others and working on the assignments given by Professor Cowin, I was able to create a more culturally responsive learning environment for my students.

Bianca Soto-King, Touro University TESOL Candidate

Touro University TESOL Candidates Luz Chavarrio’s and John Zurschmiede’s Discussion Board Vlogs on Multilingual Learner Support

When designing rich and meaningful online courses discussion boards (DBs) are an opportunity to increase the social presence of students and facilitator. Vlogs instead of text-based DBs create a social presence for students and faculty, thereby allowing connectedness and group cohesion to develop.

Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin, Assistant Professor and TESOL Practicum Coordinator, Touro University, GSE

DBs are an important vehicle to measure growth, connect with students beyond text-based contributions, introduce new technology, and interact using different modalities and media. I find that varying the format and giving students the ability to express themselves through different media introduces spaces of discovery, communication, and peer-to-peer learning while giving diverse learning styles various ways to shine.

This Discussion Board focused on a deep dive and exploration of early interventions as well as the RTI system. Touro TESOL candidates were asked to reflect on the importance of providing Multilingual Learners the support and interventions they may need. Candidates also reflected on assessing students in their native language in order to differentiate between academic or language issues.

Luz Chavarrio currently attends Touro College. This is her first year as a public school teacher. She is currently working as a Spanish teacher in an elementary school on the Lower East Side.

Luz Chavarrio’s Vlog on“Making Content Comprehensible for English Learners”

Vlog References:

Ariza, E. N., & Coady, M. R. (2018). Why Tesol?: Theories and issues in teaching English to speakers of other languages in K-12 classrooms (5th ed.). Kendall Hunt Pub Co.

Echevarría Jana, Vogt, M. E., & Short, D. (2017). Making content comprehensible for English learners: The Siop model. Pearson.

John Zurschmiede: “I am originally from South Africa where I graduated from the University of the Witwatersrand with a Batchelor’s in Primary Education. Since came to the United States, I have worked at private ESL institutions as an instructor and as an Academic Lead. I have also completed a Master’s in Adult Education and am currently studying at Touro college pursuing NYS TESOL certification.”

Vlog Response to Intervention:

Vlog references:

Emerson Dickman, G (n.d.). RTI and Reading: Response to Intervention in a Nutshell. https://www.readingrockets.org/article/rti-and-reading-response-intervention-nutshell (Links to an external site.)

RTI-Based Specific Learning Disability Determination Worksheet. (n.d.). https://wyominginstructionalnetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/MTSS-SLD-Eligibility-Documentation-Worksheet.pdf

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

New York is a state that speaks many languages. We need teachers who can find the common ground.

The MS in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) Program helps NYS-certified PreK-12 teachers more effectively teach and communicate with a diverse student population.

Academically rigorous and practice-intensive, the 33-credit program includes 50 hours of fieldwork and at least 20 days or 100 hours of supervised student teaching experience. Candidates that complete all coursework, fieldwork, and student teaching requirements are eligible for recommendation for ESL certification.

Touro University TESOL Candidate Meghan Schick on “Making Content Comprehensible for English Learners”

When designing rich and meaningful online courses discussion boards (DBs) are an opportunity to increase both the facilitators’ teaching and the social presence of the students and facilitator. Video DBs create a social presence for students and facilitators, thereby allowing connectedness and group cohesion to develop.

DBs are an important vehicle to measure growth, connect with students beyond text-based contributions, introduce new technology, and interact using different modalities and media. I find that varying the format and giving students the ability to express themselves through different media introduces spaces of discovery, communication, and peer-to-peer learning while giving diverse learning styles various ways to shine.

To gain a further understanding of early interventions as well as the RTI system Touro TESOL candidates were asked to reflect on the importance of providing Multilingual Learners the support and interventions they may need. Candidates also reflected on assessing this student in their native language in order to tell if it is an academic or a language issue.

Video contributions increase “the ability of participants…to project their personal characteristics into the community, thereby presenting themselves to the other participants as real people”

Garrison, Anderson, & Archer, 2000, p. 89.

Meghan Schick is completing her second semester at Touro Univerity, Graduate School of Education, TESOL & BLE Department and working towards her Master’s in TESOL.

I feel that I have already learned a lot of valuable information that will help me in my career.

Meghan Schick, Touro University TESOL candidate

Meghan Schick: “I thoroughly enjoyed reading Chapter 10 in “Making Content Comprehensible for English Learners.” I am very passionate when it comes to the topics of issues with Reading, RTI, and Special Education for English Learners. As an educator who has the opportunity to work with English learners, I have to be aware of their language proficiency levels. We have to be aware that a student’s difficulty to learn reading might just be from their limited English Proficiency and not mislabel them as special needs.

References:
Echevarria Jana,Vogt,M.E., & Short, D.(2017). Making Content Comprehensible for English Learners: The SIOP Model. Pearson

Meghan Schick, Touro University TESOL candidate

Questions:

  • How would you avoid the trap of confusing and labeling an entering ESL student with a student with special needs?
  • What is RIT and how might it be useful to you as a TESOL professional?
  • How might you use the RTI-Based Specific Learning Disability Determination Worksheet?

References:

Garrison, R., Anderson, T., & Archer, W. (2000). Critical inquiry in a text-based environment: Computer conferencing in higher education. The Internet and Higher Education, 2(2 – 3), 87-105. doi: 10.1016/S1096-7516(00)00016-6

Touro University’s Graduate School of Education TESOL Teacher Bianca Soto-King’s Materials Critique & Redesign for EDPN 673

EDPN 673 Methods and Materials for Teaching English as a Second Language

This course provides a historical overview of second language acquisition theories and teaching methods. Students learn how to apply current approaches, methods and techniques, with attention to the effective use of materials, in teaching English as a second language. Students will engage in the planning and implementation of standards-based ESL instruction which includes differentiated learning experiences geared to students’ needs. Emphasis is placed on creating culturally responsive learning environments. Includes 15 hours of fieldwork.

Bianca Soto-King is an NYC Public School teacher who currently works in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn. She teaches 6th grade ELA and is completing her master’s degree in TESOL at Touro University. She is a native Brooklynite and a lover of all things literary.

Redesign for Chapter 7 , Freak the Mighty

The first thing I would do is have a prereading activity. I would use Quizlet and assign vocabulary flashcards for homework the day before we read the chapter. The five words that I would present are perspective, trajectory, converging, swaggering and nanosecond. The flashcards would have the word in English, Spanish and Chinese, the page number the word is located in, a visual aid and the definition of the word.

Bianca Soto-King,
Touro University, GSE TESOL

Touro University’s Graduate School of Education TESOL Teacher Candidate  Kelly Broshears Morphology and Semantics Project: ‘The Giving Tree’ for EDDN 636

EDDN 636 Linguistic Structure of the English Language – Sociolinguistic Perspective

Course Description:
This course provides an understanding of basic linguistic concepts and their applications for TESOL instruction. Students will be introduced to the essential concepts of language development and modern linguistic components that are relevant to first and second language pedagogy. Specific concepts include: phonetics, phonology, morphology, semantics, syntax, pragmatics, discourse analysis, and the nature of regional and social variations in English and the relationship between dialects and ethnic identity. Students will explore the origins, diversity, and functions of human languages, in addition to the relationship between language and society. Students will also study key concepts of sociolinguistics in order to gain a solid understanding of the social and cultural dimensions of language. Includes 10 hours of fieldwork. 3 credits

Michele Goldin is an Assistant Professor of Bilingual Education and TESOL at Touro University Graduate School of Education. She received her Ph.D. in Bilingualism and Second Language Acquisition from Rutgers University. Her research broadly focuses on child bilingualism. As a heritage speaker of Spanish herself, she strives to increase our understanding of bilingual development with direct implications for successful academic outcomes, language policy and pedagogy, as well as bilingual and dual-language education.

Kelly Broshears is a 3rd-semester student at Touro College as a member of the TESOL master’s program. She received her undergraduate degree at Salve Regina University in Newport RI in 2019 majoring in early childhood education. “This is where I found a passion for working with ENL students. Currently, I am a kindergarten teacher for the NYC DOE in District 27.”

Context games: One idea I thought of would be a game in regard to the context of the word. I would introduce a word and would read the definition of the word. Then, I would give 3 sentences with the word but two do not make sense in the context. Students would have to choose which sentence would make sense.

Kelly Broshears, Touro University, Graduate School of Education TESOL Teacher Candidate

Touro University’s Graduate School of Education TESOL Teacher Candidate Timothy Bura’s Linguistic Case Study for EDDN 636

EDDN 636 Linguistic Structure of the English Language – Sociolinguistic Perspective

Course Description
This course provides an understanding of basic linguistic concepts and their applications for TESOL instruction. Students will be introduced to the essential concepts of language development and modern linguistic components that are relevant to first and second language pedagogy. Specific concepts include: phonetics, phonology, morphology, semantics, syntax, pragmatics, discourse
analysis, and the nature of regional and social variations in English and the relationship between dialects and ethnic identity. Students will explore the origins, diversity, and functions of human languages, in addition to the relationship between language and society. Students will also study key concepts of sociolinguistics in order to gain a solid understanding of the social and cultural dimensions of language. Includes 10 hours of fieldwork. 3 credits

Michele Goldin is an Assistant Professor of Bilingual Education and TESOL at Touro University Graduate School of Education. She received her Ph.D. in Bilingualism and Second Language Acquisition from Rutgers University. Her research broadly focuses on child bilingualism. As a heritage speaker of Spanish herself, she strives to increase our understanding of bilingual development with direct implications for successful academic outcomes, language policy and pedagogy, as well as bilingual and dual-language education.

Touro University’s Graduate School of Education TESOL Teacher Candidate Timothy Bura received his Bachelor’s degree in Sociology/Anthropology from Long Island University Brooklyn. After completing his undergraduate studies, he joined the NYC Teaching Fellows and earned his Master’s degree in Teaching Urban Adolescents with Disabilities from Long Island University Brooklyn. “Currently, I am working on my second Master’s in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages at Touro University. I taught for four years at Midwood High School at Brooklyn College and transferred to Innovation Diploma Plus High School this year.”

I did some research into how to make and teach the phoneme /th/ and found a Chicago based speech therapist named Karen George’s website. She advises that you first teach the mouth movements and tongue placement for that sound. She writes that you place your tongue in between your teeth and breathe out. This will make an “unvoiced /th/ sound”. When David and I met to work on this, I had him do this exercise (George, 2012). Since we are required to wear masks, I separated myself from him to show him what I meant by placing one’s tongue in between their teeth.

TESOL Teacher Candidate Timothy Bura, Touro University – Graduate School of Education

Touro University’s Graduate School of Education TESOL Teacher Candidate Shannon Smith’s Text Analysis for EDDN 637, Second Language Learners and the Content Areas

EDDN 637 Second Language Learners and the Content Areas

Join the https://gse.touro.edu/academics/masters-programs/tesol/

Students will become acquainted with and practice effective approaches, methods, and strategies for teaching and evaluating English language learners in the content areas (ELA, social studies, math and science). Throughout the course, students will explore the impact of culture and language on classroom learning. Special challenges in teaching and assessment in each content area will also be discussed. Includes 15 hours of fieldwork.

Shannon Smith, a Touro University TESOL candidate pursues a degree in the TESOL program at Touro University, Graduate school of education. She is a certified general education and special education 1-6th grade. She is currently filling in as a leave replacement Kindergarten and First grade ENL

Text: American History, Unit 2: Creating a Nation

English language learners face a lot of challenges when the linguistic and cognitive demands of certain content areas are unaligned to their cultural background knowledge and perspectives. The academic standards recommended by the NYS for English language learners can be very overwhelming for both students and educators. Teachers play a critical role in ensuring that students are linked with available basic literature and prior knowledge whenever they are being guided to understand any of the general subjects(Haynes,2005).

The instruction begins with educators learning from the learners and putting ourselves in the place of our students with the frustrating, challenging factors they face on a daily basis so that we can learn and understand the way they do. As educators, we can find more engaging ways to help ELLs learn new material that draws on their own unique background knowledge and perspectives. I am currently a Kindergarten and first-grade ENL teacher. With some setbacks this year and a shortage of substitutes, I have been placed all over the school and do not see my ENL students as much as I would like to. I have not been able to cover the subjects I had planned to. When I do have the opportunity to see my students we are still working on letter and sound recognition which was difficult to find required texts and resources for since it is very simple and basic. I chose to use a resource that was provided in this course that will still be beneficial in my teaching since I am acting as a substitute majority of the time and work with students k-6. I chose to analyze and critique a chapter from a social studies textbook on the American Revolution. Chapter four of the American revolution is a relevant example of how English language learners face challenges when learning social studies, especially when relating to American history.

This American Revolution unit explores the major causes and people of the war, focusing on the importance of America and New York State during this period. The education system lacks efficiency in impacting new English learners to respond to cognitive needs because there is a lack of familiarity with the historical background being used. If a student is not from America or specifically New York State, but is expected to have prior background knowledge on New York State and information about America, students are not going to understand key ideas and details. A majority of ELLs do not have the same background knowledge that their peers have or that textbook authors take for granted, like knowing the 50 states and having them memorized. They also bring their own unique and valuable experiences and background to the classroom. Sometimes those experiences can be connected to the content to make the instruction meaningful and help them comprehend the material, but if they cannot make connections to their background knowledge and different points of view or ideas are expressed, they might miss important concepts and ideas in the lesson. A student might be a master in history about the country they are from, and know all about the regions and areas, and would be able to understand wars and battles that were fought where they were from, but cannot grasp or make connections to places like New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Massachusetts, etc. that this unit also places a huge emphasis on. The textbook states “The Treaty of Paris gave Britain most of Canada, all French lands east of the Mississippi River, and Spanish Florida.” (p.297). This could be very confusing to students who do not have background knowledge about these places. When a student hears “Spanish Florida” and does not know what state Florida is, what could it possibly mean to them by saying Spanish Florida? And how confusing could it be for them to talk about the French lands, but then also talk about Canada and Florida?

English Language Learners might have already learned about important historic moments in their own country, and now we are asking them to relearn something they learned about in a different way because what they have already learned is not correct or relevant to what they are learning in American history today in the classroom.  The first thing I would do prior to introducing the American Revolution is to pre-teach about America and introduce the 50 states. I would create engaging activities and games using visual representatives to help students recognize and eventually maybe memorize the 50 states so when they are reading and learning about them in this unit, they can make some connection to them or be familiar with Boston when it comes up, or New York.  Some ways to also engage ELLs in regards to this unit of the American Revolution to draw on their background knowledge and perspectives could be to hold a class discussion on where students are from and to show visual representations like maps to point out where they are from and then take that opportunity to compare it to America and relate it into the American Revolution and use this as a teaching point to teach about the states in America that they might see come up in lessons about the American Revolution. The more they see and learn about the states that are presented in the unit, the more they will start to recognize and memorize them and gain more knowledge about them.

This unit on the American Revolution has a lot of academic language and key vocabulary that is essential for students to know in order to understand concepts and ideas of the American Revolution. Two major ideas that come up a lot in this unit are cause and effect. The textbook states “Why It Matters Understanding cause and effect can help you see why events happen” (p.303). Pre-teaching the meaning of these words will eliminate any confusion when students are learning about a cause and effect of an aspect from the American Revolution. Explicitly explaining to students that a cause is an action or event that makes something happen, and an effect is what happens as the result of the action or event, is essential in this unit as a majority of the battles fought during the Revolution was a cause of something and always has an effect. This concept is also important to teach because a question on a state test might come up like “what was the cause of______” or “what was the effect of________”. It can be difficult for students to understand cause and effect especially on a topic that they do not connect to or understand. For example, the textbook states “In the mid-1600s, people began to leave the Massachusetts Bay Colony and start their own settlements. Some left because of religious reasons. Others left to find better economic opportunities” (p.304). In this statement, it is important for students to understand the cause and effect of people leaving the Massachusetts Bay Colony, but it might be difficult to understand if they do not have background knowledge of Massachusetts or know what that is, and also if they don’t understand the meaning of cause and effect it will be challenging to understand why wars in the revolution began and ended. Starting by having students find and share real-life examples of causes and effects that relate to their personal lives and backgrounds is a great start to introduce cause and effect of the American Revolution.

 In this unit of the American Revolution, there are also an incredible amount of unknown words for students and key vocabulary words that could be difficult to understand. Words like boycott, taxation, representation, parliament, proclamation, congress, protest, repeal appear a lot throughout the chapter and are important to be exposed to when learning about the different wars and battles of the American Revolution. For example, “In October 1765, representatives from nine colonies met in New York City in what became known as the Stamp Act Congress” (p.303). If students come across this excerpt, or it is read to them, and they do not know what congress means they are going to be very confused. The lines “no taxation without representation” also are repeated a lot throughout the chapter and is an important concept when learning about the American Revolution. Introducing these vocabulary words in depth is going to be beneficial to engage students in understanding the American Revolution. Some ways I would help my students is to pre-teach all of the important vocabulary words by utilizing word clouds and making sure I present a visual definition for each word. To begin a lesson on vocabulary, I would post a word cloud using wordsift containing the important vocabulary words for the unit. I would have the students on their own make a list of the words that they know and words that they do not know. After a few minutes of independent work, I would have the students turn and talk to a partner to compare their lists and learn from one another some of the words they did not know. After the partner talks I would move into the vocabulary instruction so that by the end of the lesson, every student would at least be exposed to and recognize every word.

To begin a lesson on vocabulary, I would post a word cloud using wordsift containing the important vocabulary words for the unit. I would have the students on their own make a list of the words that they know and words that they do not know. After a few minutes of independent work, I would have the students turn and talk to a partner to compare their lists and learn from one another some of the words they did not know

Shannon Smith, Touro University Graduate School of Education TESOL Teacher Candidate

References

 Open resource. America’s History. New York: Worth Publishers, 2022. PDF. Social Studies textbook Unit 4 637 (4).pdf Chapter 4: The American Revolution, 1754-1783 – Northern Local …

Haynes, J. (2005). Challenges for ELLs in content area learning. In TESOL annual convention, Baltimore, MD.

Touro University’s Graduate School of Education TESOL Teacher Candidate Meghan Schick on Figurative Language and Multilingual Learners

EDDN 637 Second Language Learners and the Content Areas

Students will become acquainted with and practice effective approaches, methods, and strategies for teaching and evaluating English language learners in the content areas (ELA, social studies, math and science). Throughout the course, students will explore the impact of culture and language on classroom learning. Special challenges in teaching and assessment in each content area will also be discussed. Includes 15 hours of fieldwork.

Join the https://gse.touro.edu/academics/masters-programs/tesol/

Text Analysis & Critique Assignment Description

Following a discussion on the cognitive and linguistic demands of the content areas, you will apply these ideas by closely analyzing a chapter, or an aspect of one content-area text currently in use or recommended by New York State/BOE. Upon analysis of underlying concepts, you will develop a thesis and the purpose of your analysis. You will sequence your ideas with evidence from the text supporting important points. Your critique will feature substantial, logical, and concrete development of ideas describing what makes that concept or section challenging for ELLs. Length: 3-4-page paper (typed, double spaced, 12-point font).

Learning Outcomes:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of various text analysis techniques in relation to educational content-area texts.
  • In written form effectively articulate, evaluate and critique educational content-area texts concepts using professional TESOL language, theory, and standards.
  • Ask questions from the view of an ELL/ESL learner that can be meaningfully answered using content-area text analysis.
  • Evaluate evidence; interpret data such as ELL students cannot glean meaning from context when they have too many words to decipher.
  • Express yourself effectively on graduate-level writing

Meghan Schick is a graduate student in the Masters of Education TESOL program at Touro University’s Graduate School of Education, TESOL/BLE program. “I am really enjoying learning more about how to support my students who are English Language Learners in this program. I hope to become a TESOL teacher one day in the future.”

I think that acting out similes and idioms is another effective strategy to support English language learners. One way I would teach my students about similes and idioms is by showing them visual representations from the text. I would also have the students create their own visual representation of each simile and idiom we find in the novel. For example, I would have the student copy down the sentence, “It was like having a chestful of bats”(Davies, 4). I would then encourage them to draw a visual representation of what they believe it means. I would have the students turn and talk to share their ideas with each other.

Meghan Schick, Touro University, Graduate School of Education TESOL Teacher Candidate 

Touro University’s Graduate School of Education Advanced Certificate in TESOL Candidate Marie-Nansie Victor on Morphology and Semantics for EDDN 636

EDDN 636 Linguistic Structure of the English Language – Sociolinguistic Perspective

Course Description
This course provides an understanding of basic linguistic concepts and their applications for TESOL instruction. Students will be introduced to the essential concepts of language development and modern linguistic components that are relevant to first and second language pedagogy. Specific concepts include: phonetics, phonology, morphology, semantics, syntax, pragmatics, discourse
analysis, and the nature of regional and social variations in English and the relationship between dialects and ethnic identity. Students will explore the origins, diversity, and functions of human languages, in addition to the relationship between language and society. Students will also study key concepts of sociolinguistics in order to gain a solid understanding of the social and cultural dimensions of language. Includes 10 hours of fieldwork. 3 credits

Join Touro University, GSE: Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) and Bilingual Education and Services https://gse.touro.edu/academics/advanced-certificates/

Marie-Nansie Victor’s personal introduction: My name is Marie-Nansie Victor. I immigrated to the United States from Haiti about two decades ago. I am married and blessed with four children. Currently, I work as a paraprofessional for the New York City Board of Education. I received an associate degree in Liberal Arts from Kingsborough Community College, and I went to York College where I graduated with a bachelor’s degree in French. I am now working toward an Advanced Certificate in TESOL at Touro College after completing a master’s degree in Early Childhood Education (General and Special Education.)
Even though I have a busy life between work, school, and family, I manage to find time for some of my favorite hobbies like cooking, baking, and reading. With the help and support of my instructors, I successfully complete all my assignments. Soon I will be working as a teacher. I have a passion for teaching, and I hope to inspire all my students.

Michele Goldin is an Assistant Professor of Bilingual Education and TESOL at Touro University Graduate School of Education. She received her Ph.D. in Bilingualism and Second Language Acquisition from Rutgers University. Her research broadly focuses on child bilingualism. As a heritage speaker of Spanish herself, she strives to increase our understanding of bilingual development with direct implications for successful academic outcomes, language policy and pedagogy, as well as bilingual and dual-language education.

Difficult Words for Multilingual Learners

First, I will divide the class into four heterogeneous groups, and each group will discuss one of the words written on a different color card. Then a member of the group, most likely an ELL, will share with the class, while the other members will assist and support him/her.

Touro University’s Graduate School of Education Advanced Certificate in TESOL Candidate Marie-Nansie Victor

Touro University’s Graduate School of Education Bilingual Teacher Candidate Valerie Szuster: A Linguistic Case Study for EDDN 636

EDDN 636 Linguistic Structure of the English Language – Sociolinguistic Perspective

Course Description
This course provides an understanding of basic linguistic concepts and their applications for TESOL instruction. Students will be introduced to the essential concepts of language development and modern linguistic components that are relevant to first and second language pedagogy. Specific concepts include: phonetics, phonology, morphology, semantics, syntax, pragmatics, discourse
analysis, and the nature of regional and social variations in English and the relationship between dialects and ethnic identity. Students will explore the origins, diversity, and functions of human languages, in addition to the relationship between language and society. Students will also study key concepts of sociolinguistics in order to gain a solid understanding of the social and cultural dimensions of language. Includes 10 hours of fieldwork. 3 credits

Michele Goldin is an Assistant Professor of Bilingual Education and TESOL at Touro University Graduate School of Education. She received her Ph.D. in Bilingualism and Second Language Acquisition from Rutgers University. Her research broadly focuses on child bilingualism. As a heritage speaker of Spanish herself, she strives to increase our understanding of bilingual development with direct implications for successful academic outcomes, language policy and pedagogy, as well as bilingual and dual-language education.

Valerie Szuster is a 7th and 8th grade World Languages Teacher at Richard R. Sherman Great Neck North Middle School. She is of Argentine and Colombian descent, and speaks 4 languages: English, Spanish, French, and Hebrew! She earned her BA in French Secondary Education from New York University and is currently completing her MS in TESOL at Touro University.

Dr. Michele Goldin: “Mrs. Szuster’sfieldwork project, a case study, shows a keen understanding of the foundations of research. For the project, she collected a speech sample from an ELL, analyzed two areas of language in which the student encountered some challenges (phonetics and syntax), designed and implemented an activity to address each of these challenges, and then reflected on the results of the activity.”

From a World Languages teacher’s perspective, I find myself using a lot of games, visuals, and TPR in the classroom, such as battleship, bingo, dominos, and Kahoot, to decrease the sense of fears, triggers to the affective filter, and increase students’ participation.

Touro University, Graduate School of Education
Bilingual Teacher Candidate Valerie Szuster