Aria in Classic Style Marcel Grandjany Jasmin Bey Cowin Harp, Christian Markus Raiser Organ

Live recording at the Evangelische Stadtkirche Karlsruhe of the Aria in Classic Style by Marcel Grandjany (1891-1975), a meditative piece for harp and organ. Grandjany was primarily a harpist, but also played some organ, which is why both instruments blend so beautifully. This is a live recording and not a studio recording.

 

“The Flowers of Edinburgh” Theresa Thompson, Flute & Jasmin Bey Cowin, Harp

“The Flowers of Edinburgh” appears in Oswald’s Caledonian Pocket Companion, 1742, but cannot be traced in any earlier musical collection. It became a fashionable hornpipe about 1740, and was called “The Flowers of Edinburgh,” in compliment, it is supposed, to the young ladies of the Scottish capital who were then attending the dancing schools. About the same time the following words were written to the tune.
⁠He was the flower of a’ his kin,
The absence of his bonnie face
⁠Has rent my tender heart in twain.
I day or night find no delight;
⁠In silent tears I still complain;
And exclaim ‘gainst those my rival foes,
⁠That ha’e ta’en from me my darling swain.

Despair and anguish fill my breast,
⁠Since I have lost my blooming rose;
I sigh and moan while others rest;
⁠His absence yields me no repose.
To seek my love I’ll range and rove,
⁠Through every grove and distant plain;
Thus I’ll ne’er cease, but spend my days,
⁠To hear tidings from my darling swain.

There’s naething strange in nature’s change,
⁠Since parents show such cruelty;
They caused my love from me to range,
⁠And know not to what destiny.
The pretty kids and tender lambs
⁠May cease to sport upon the plain;
But I’ll mourn and lament in deep discontent
⁠For the absence of my darling swain.

Kind Neptune, let me thee entreat,
⁠To send a fair and pleasant gale;
Ye dolphins sweet, upon me wait,
⁠And convey me upon your tail;
Heaven bless my voyage with success,
⁠While crossing of the raging main,
And send me safe o’er to a distant shore,
⁠To meet my lovely darling swain.

All joy and mirth at our return
⁠Shall then abound from Tweed to Tay;
The bells shall ring and sweet birds sing,
⁠To grace and crown our nuptial day.
Thus bless’d wi’ charms in my love’s arms,
⁠My heart once more I will regain;
Then I’ll range no more to a distant shore,
⁠But in love will enjoy my darling swain.

 

 

Wilafjord traditional Shetland with Theresa Thompson Flute and Jasmin Bey Cowin Harp

In his book, ‘In Search of Willafjord’ (Shetland Times; 2016), Maurice highlights how the tune can be linked back to the whaling days. Shetlander James Peterson (1867 – 1955) went to the Greenland whaling. He also played the fiddle. He learned the tune and passed it to his son, Bobby Peterson (who, in turn, you could say, has passed it down to his grandson, Bryan Gear, another of Shetland’s current leading exponents of fiddle playing). Played on a clàrsach – Scottish harp.

This is a home recording – not a studio recording.

 

In his book, ‘In Search of Willafjord’ (Shetland Times; 2016), Maurice highlights how the tune can be linked back to the whaling days. Shetlander James Peterson (1867 – 1955) went to the Greenland whaling. He also played the fiddle. He learned the tune and passed it to his son, Bobby Peterson (who, in turn, you could say, has passed it down to his grandson, Bryan Gear, another of Shetland’s current leading exponents of fiddle playing). Played on a clàrsach – Scottish harp.

Adios Querida Ladino-Jewish Folksong

Que te vas,
Me lo has dicho querida
Porque dices,
Que mi amor te canso
Y te vas,
A buscar otro nido
Te cansaron,
Mis besos de amor
Adios querida,
Te vas amor
Dios te bendiga,
Adiós adiós.
Y pensar,
Que te di toda mi alma
Y en mis brazos,
Un dia te dormí
Por las noches,
Velando en tú cama
Procurando,
Que fueras feliz
Si no es conmigo,
Busca otro amor
Adios querida,
Adiós adiós #jewishfolk songs #ladino #harp