Dr. Cowin’s NAFSA 2020 eConnection Virtual Poster “Augmented Reality: The Merge Cube and Google Expeditions”

by Jasmin Bey Cowin, Ed.D.

Assistant Professor and Practicum Coordinator, Touro College, Graduate School of Education

The NAFSA 2020 eConnection Virtual Poster Fair was a fantastic experience! It was an honor to participate.

Touro College TESOL Candidate Evelyn Ramos’ Materials Critique

Touro TESOL candidate Evelyn Ramos earned a dual bachelor’s degree in Adolescence Education Spanish (7-12) and Spanish Language, Hispanic Literature and Culture. She graduated in 2016 with Cum Laude honors. Her teaching career started 3 years ago in 2017 at Brentwood Union Free School district as a bilingual language teacher. She currently teaches Home Language Arts to 7th & 8th graders at East Middle school. “I choose to return back to Brentwood to give back to the community that gave so much to me. I started my graduate degree in 2017 and will graduate on June 16th, 2020 with a master’s degree in TESOL. I have accomplished all this being a mother to two beautiful girls, a wife, daughter, sister, and granddaughter.”

Touro TESOL candidate Evelyn Ramos earned a dual bachelor’s degree in Adolescence Education Spanish (7-12) and Spanish Language, Hispanic Literature and Culture. She graduated in 2016 with Cum Laude honors. Her teaching career started 3 years ago in 2017 at Brentwood Union Free School district as a bilingual language teacher. She currently teaches Home Language Arts to 7th & 8th graders at East Middle school. “I choose to return back to Brentwood to give back to the community that gave so much to me. I started my graduate degree in 2017 and will graduate on June 16th, 2020 with a master’s degree in TESOL. I have accomplished all this being a mother to two beautiful girls, a wife, daughter, sister, and granddaughter.”

Materials Critique Assignment

Evaluation and Selection

Choose 3 chapters/sections OR 3 books (either from a textbook series, library, or a set of supplemental texts to review). Prepare a written description minimum 2 pages per chapter/book/resource and critique of the material or resource, analyzing its effectiveness for ELL students.

You will need to answer to each

  • Level of content familiarity or background knowledge
  • Level of language
  • Level of textual support
  • Level of cultural fit
  • Redesign one section/activity of the original material so that it meets the need of ELLs.

Level of content familiarity or background knowledge

How close a fit is the text to the English learner’s content knowledge or background experiences?

  • What content and concepts are presented in the text? What is the content/conceptual load of the text? Basic and familiar? New but general? New and specialized?
  • Is this presentation an introduction to the content and concepts or is it continued conceptual development at a higher level?
  • What is the English learner’s level of content familiarity or background knowledge related to the content and concepts? Is the concept very familiar, familiar, unfamiliar, or not common?

Submission: Student Background

For this material critique, I observed three different teachers. I choose one book from the 6th-grade entering class, one book from the 7th grade emerging/transitioning course, and one both from the 8th grade emerging/transitioning class. The 8th-grade class is made up of five students. All students are in the 8th grade and are Spanish speaking students who are from Honduras, Ecuador, and El Salvador. The six students are classified as English language learners. They are classified at the emerging, transitioning, and expanding performance level; three students are transitioning, two students are emerging, and one student is expanding. Students a heterogeneously grouped by their language proficiency in the target language and academic knowledge in their home language. All of them have been in-country and in a U.S. school setting for less than 3 to 4 years. They have developed literacy skills in both their native and English language. However, all six students feel more comfortable in their native language than English. An exceptionality in the class is that the expanding student was in an integrated ELA class. Still, the ELA/ENL teacher recommends that the student be placed back into a stand-alone ENL/ELA class due to her language proficiency. Class is made up of 6 students in a stand-alone ENL/ELA setting. In this setting, there is one teacher dual certified in ELA & ENL. All instructions take place within the classroom during a block of two periods (45 minutes each). Students sit in tables of 2 or 3 and work in pairs. The co-operating teacher uses peer editing, pair-work, turn & talk, visual aids, and gallery walk to help students comprehend the target language. 

The 6th-grade class is made up of twelve students. All students are in the 6th grade and are Spanish speaking students who are from Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador. The twelve students are classified as English language learners. They are classified at the entering performance level. Students are heterogeneously grouped by their language proficiency in their target language and academic knowledge in the home language. All of them have been in-country and in a U.S. school setting for less than one year. Students can speak and read well in their native language. However, their writing skills are weak in their native language. Class is made up of 12 students in a stand-alone ENL/ELA setting. In this setting, there is one teacher dual certified in ELA & ENL. All instructions take place within the classroom during one period (45 minutes). Students sit in tables of 5 or 6 and work in pairs. Students feel more comfortable using the native language, and the co-operating teacher uses cognates, visual aids, and TPS to help the students understand the target language. 

The 7th-grade class is made up of sixteen students. All students are in the 7th grade and are Spanish speaking students, who are from Honduras, Guatemala, Dominican Republic, and El Salvador. The fifteen students are classified as English language learners. They are classified at the emerging and transitioning performance level; 10 students are transitioning, and six students are emerging. Students are heterogeneously grouped by their language proficiency in their target language and academic knowledge in the home language. All of them have been in-country and in a U.S. school setting for 1-3 years. Students can speak and read well in their native language. However, their writing skills are weak in their native language. Class is made up of 16 students in a stand-alone ENL/ELA setting. In this setting, there is one teacher dual certified in ELA & ENL. All instructions take place within the classroom during a block of two periods (45 minutes each). Students sit in groups of 3 to 5 and work in pairs. Students feel more comfortable using the native language, and the co-operating teacher uses cognates, visual aids, and TPS to help the students understand the target language. 

Students are in a Bilingual/ENL program. The school is part of the Brentwood School District- East Middle School on Long Island, 6th, 7th, and 8th grade ELA/ENL classes. The school is located in a suburban community in which the majority of the community members are Hispanic and from different Latin American countries.       

Escaping to Freedom by Daniel Schulman- 8th grade

The first text I choose to talk about for this assignment is the biography “Escaping Freedom” by Daniel Schulman. This text is a narrated biography on Josiah Henson, a runaway slave escaping to freedom. The biography narratives how Josiah left the plantation with his family in search of freedom. If he did not do so, he would have been sold away and separated from his family. The text describes how the family traveled to the “promised land” and became free. The biography shows cause and effect through the text and repeats the academic vocabulary numerous times. In addition, the biography illustrates how the slaves had to use the underground railroad and left their homes with nothing but a small bag. The biography is accompanied by many pictures and illiterates that allow the students to comprehended what they are reading.

Seeking freedom and escaping freedom is a topic that not only English language learners can relate to but also students who are native speakers of English. English language learners can also relate to their personal/family experiences. Previously, the students have learned how freedom is a privilege that many people fought for throughout history. They have been exposed to the academic vocabulary and the short story “Escaping Freedom.” The gallery walk will help students visualize what many people had to go through during the time of slavery in this country. Students will go on a gallery walk around the classroom and view pictures related to the story “Escaping Freedom” and slavery. Students will answer questions about the photos.

The unit on freedom will involve teaching students about freedom, who the important historical figures of seeking freedom are, and how freedom affects our everyday lives. Several students in this class can relate to the political issues that arise in today’s society. This unit will benefit students in the future because they can apply this knowledge to real-life situations. They will learn that discrimination continues to occur in today’s societies. Students need to realize the level of freedom in different areas of the world. Additionally, this unit benefits English language learners, as it helps them learn content-specific vocabulary that they will utilize in their everyday lives. Furthermore, our English language learners will thrive from this unit on freedom because, at the end of the unit, the students will celebrate their work by presenting their essay or PowerPoint on a historical individual who fought for civil rights. Each student or pair of students will share their projects with their peers.

           The students have previous knowledge of different historical people or figures in their own country who have fought for freedom. As well as background knowledge from their social studies class on slavery and the search to escape to freedom. Front-loading essential vocabulary: before the lesson student has been practicing the vocabulary. They created post-it note vocabulary using each word. They have the post-it notes in their interactive notebook. Key Words: Assist, Capture, Escape, Freedom, Reward, Right, Slave, and travel. On another day, students had a class discussion and used accountable talk to discuss freedom and rights using the academic vocabulary. Students used the vocabulary to express and answer questions regarding their experience with freedom and rights. Reading “Escaping to Freedom.” The class has read “Escaping to Freedom” and also listened to the story. On a separate day, students have a class discussion about the cause and effect that the story provided about the main character. The teacher also went over how the key vocabulary was used in context with the story. Students will have a class discussion about what life was like during that period in history, for example, plantation life and home life. They used the 3 new things I discovered, 2 interesting facts I learned, 1 question I still have… model to discuss the lifestyle during that period. The students will then complete a gallery walk on the story to further understand as to why people escaped to freedom during the slavery era. The gallery walk will help students visualize what many people had to go through during the time of slavery in this country. Students will go on a gallery walk around the classroom and view pictures related to the story “Escaping to Freedom” and slavery. Students will answer questions related to the picture and story. The gallery walk integrates all language skills. Students will have to listen to their peers’ ideas regarding the picture, share their opinion by stating it to their peers using the target and L1 language. Also, students will have to read each prompt/question and write down their answers on the worksheet. Accountable talk sentence frames have been provided to help students communicate in the target language and support in the native language. Students had access to their interactive notebook with reference to the key vocabulary. Students have prior experience using stations and gallery walks in their class. Students have expressed interest in working in groups and learning through gallery walks.  

Students are grouped in cooperative learning groups because they can work together and help each other. 

The students are grouped primarily by their target language proficiency level involving comprehension as well as their academic knowledge in their native language. Students will also have a do now, which consists of a quick write called Collins Writing. Collins writing is used across the curriculum. This type of writing allows the learner to understand and remember the content being introduced to them. 

NYS ELA Standards:

Reading Standards for Informational text 

RI. 6.2 Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.

RI. 6.5 Analyze how a particular sentence, paragraph, chapter, or section fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of ideas. 

Writing Standards

W. 6.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. 

W. 6.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (times for research, reflection, and revision) and short time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Speaking and Listening Standards

SL. 6.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 6 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

SL. 6.2 Interpret information presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how it contributes to a topic, text, or issue under study. 

Language Standards 

L. 6.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. 

L. 6.6 Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. 

Applicable NYS ELL Standards: 

Standard 1 – Social and Instructional Language 

 English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting. 

Standard 2 – Language of Language Arts 

English language learners communicate information, ideas, and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of language arts. 

Standard 5 – Language of Social Studies 

 English language learners communicate information, ideas, and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of social studies. 

Objectives:

Content Objective: Students will be able to discover the risks people took to free themselves and to help others gain freedom.

Language Objective: Students will be able to respond to and interpret visuals on escaping to freedom using academic vocabulary.

Key Vocabulary:

  • Assist
  • Capture
  • Escape
  • Freedom
  • Reward
  • Right
  • Slave 
  • Travel

Lesson format for : Escaping to Freedom by Daniel Schulman:

Essential Question:What risks did salves take to escape slavery?
Focus Question:How did slaves escape to gain freedom?
Academic LanguageStudents will use the key vocabulary to discuss why and how slaves escaped to freedom.
Guided Questions/Prompts:Write down as many words as you can to describe this picture.What do you notice about the traveling family?What did enslaved people and those who helped them risk by using the underground railroad?What would you do if you came across a runaway slave like Harriet Tubman? Use academic vocabulary: assist, freedom, slave, capture
Task:Warm Up –The class will complete the Do Now- Type 1 Collins Writing- Look at the wagon and objects (Cotton and Crops) on the table.  In three lines describe what you see.  The we will share out the responses. Class discussion (Teacher led)– We will go over the do now and discuss the ideas that the students came up on with the during the quick write.  The wagon and crops will be used to active prior knowledge on plantation life.Word presentation on the Aquos Interactive Board will review the agenda for the day and the step by step instructions for the gallery walk.   Think-a-loud will be used also to model how to think through the process. Teacher will also model how to use the accountable talk sheet.  Teacher will tell the students to reference their interactive notebook for the key vocabulary words.Students will go on a gallery walk around the classroom and view pictures related to the story “Escaping to Freedom” and slavery. Students will answer questions related to the picture and/or story. The gallery walk integrates all language skills.  Students will have to listen to their peers’ ideas regarding the picture, share their idea by stating it to their peer using the target and L1 language. In addition, students will have to read each prompt/question and write down their answers on the worksheet. After students will work in groups to share their ideas and explanation of each prompt/image.  Students will have the opportunity to learn and teach each other the how to respond the question and interpret the image.  In their group’s students will share their response, review and reflect on each other’s answers. Groups –  Students are heterogeneously grouped by their language proficiency in their target language and academic knowledge in the home language.   Students are grouped in cooperative learning groups, because they are able to work together and help each other.  The group will primarily be working on a think-pair-share assignment. Closure – Will review and have a class discussion on the gallery walk.  Students will share their answers and ideas with the class.  We will end the class reflecting on what we learned today and throughout the week on the topic escaping to freedom.I will close the lesson by handing out the exit slip and explaining the homework.  Students will have to complete the selection review worksheet- page 185 from their practice workbook.  

Bloom’s Knowledge Matrix:

The Knowledge DimensionRememberUnder-standApplyAnalyzeEvaluateCreate
Factslistdescribeinterpretidentifysummarizerelate
Conceptsrecallexplainapplydistinguishreorganizeconclude
Processesnamecontrastorganizeexamineopinionconstruct
Proceduresoutlineexplainwritepoint outcategorizemodel
Principlestellinterpretmodelcomparedetermineselect
Metacognitiveretellinferconstructclassifyconcludeelaborate
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Families by Ann Morris- 6th grade

The next book I chose to talk about is Families by Ann Morris. This book explains the different members of a family.  This book is a non-fiction informational text on the different kinds of families in the world.  The type of genre of the book is a photo essay.  A photo is a short piece of non-fiction. It uses photographs to give information about the topic. This photo essay is about families. The starts by reviewing the key vocabulary words regarding the family members: grandpa, grandma, uncle, aunt, cousin, father, mother, sister, brother, me, and together with a picture to make the input of the language more understandable.  The photo essay continues to explain all the things families do together.  Some of the things, families do together help another, work, play, cook, eat, and celebrate.  Finally, the photo essay ends, showing that children live in many kinds of families and that families are unique in many different ways.  One thing families have in common is that they love, share, and care for each family member no matter where in the world you are from. 

 The unit about home and family is related to English language learners.  ELLs know how to describe their home and family in the target language.  At the same time, students discover that families are all unique and look different in their own special way.  This unit will benefit students in the future because they can apply this knowledge to real-life situations. They will learn how to identify, describe, and model how their house looks like and construct their family tree.  It is essential for the students to realize the families are made up of different family members and that families care, share, and love for one another in all areas of the world. Additionally, this unit benefits English language learners, as it helps them learn content-specific vocabulary that they will utilize in their everyday lives. Furthermore, our English language learners will thrive from this unit on home and family because, at the end of the unit, the students will celebrate their work by presenting their PowerPoint on their home here and in their home country and family tree. Each student will share their project with the class or within their group.

The students have previous knowledge of the structure of the house and household items.  Students also have prior experience in their native language, the names of members that make up a family, as well as background knowledge from their Home language arts class on autobiography and personal narrative unit.  I also front-loaded the key vocabulary words before the lesson.  Students have been practicing the vocabulary words by mix and matching the words with the picture and home language translation. For example, the word family would be matched with the picture labeled “familia.”  Students also completed a rating scale for the vocabulary words than answered questions to deepen their understanding of the word. Key Words: family, together, parents, grandma, grandpa, uncle, aunt, cousin, father, mother, sister, brother, and me. Before the lesson, students had a class discussion on the family tree using the academic vocabulary.  Students used the vocabulary to complete the family tree of the Lin Family and answer questions regarding their family.  Reading “Families”: The class has read “Families” and also listened to the photo essay.  As students read and listen to the photo essay, they completed two diagrams to tell about main ideas of Families.  The main idea is given to the student. However, as they read, the learners need to find details to support the main idea.  The first main idea is that families do a lot of things together. The second main idea is that children live in many kinds of families.  Students will listen to the story as a class. Then with their group re-read the story and complete the main idea diagrams.  Once they completed the main idea diagrams the students will work with their partner to create a chant about their family.  At the end of the lesson, the students will read their chant and realize that everyone has a family, but each of them is unique and special in their own way.  Students are grouped in cooperative learning groups because they can work together and help each other.  The students are grouped primarily by their target language proficiency level involving comprehension as well as their academic knowledge in their native language.

NYS CCSS-ELA Standards:

Reading Standard

CCRA.R.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development ; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. 

CCRA.R.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. 

CCRA.R.10 Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently. 

Writing Standards

CCRA.W.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. 

Speaking and Listening Standards

CCRA.SL.4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style and appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

Language Standards 

CCRA.L.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. 

CCRA.L.6 Acquire and use a range of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when encountering an unknown term important to comprehension or expression. 

Applicable NYS ELL Standards: 

Standard 1 – Social and Instructional Language 
English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting. 

Standard 2 – Language of Language Arts 

English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of language arts. 

Standard 5 – Language of Social Studies 
English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of social studies. 

Objectives:

Content Objective: Students will be able to identify details that support the main idea about families.

Language Objective: Students will be able to write the supporting details in the main idea diagram and say a chant using words about their family.

Key Vocabulary:

  • Family
  • Together
  • Parents
  • Grandmother
  • Grandfather
  • Uncle
  • Aunt
  • Cousin
  • Father
  • Mother
  • Sister
  • Brother
  • Me

Lesson Format for Families:

Essential Question:Are all families the same?
Focus Question:What is your family like?
Academic LanguageUnderstanding the main idea and supporting it with details from the text. 
Guided Questions:What things do families do together?Do all children live in the same kind of family? How many family members are in your family?
Task:As a class we will read and listen to the photo essay on families. Then within their groups they will complete the main idea diagrams. Teacher will assist both groups as they complete the main idea diagrams. Each student will complete a chant about their family. 1. List their family members. Examples: grandmother, brothers2. Tell more about them. Tell how many. Examples: One grandma, two brothers Students will then write a chant. Tell about your family. 

Bloom’s Knowledge Matrix:

The Knowledge DimensionRememberUnder-standApplyAnalyzeEvaluateCreate
Factsrecalldescribeinterpretidentifysummarizejustify
Conceptsidentifyexplainapplybreakdownwritesupport
Processeslistexpressdemonstrateoutlinedevelopconstruct
Proceduresmatchidentifyillustratepoint outcategorizemodel
Principlestellinterpretmodelcomparedetermineselect
Metacognitivedefinedistinguishshowanalyzeexplainelaborate
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Body Works by Janine Wheeler- 7th grade

The last book I choose to talk about is Body Works by Janine Wheeler. This book explains the different parts of the body.  This book is a non-fiction informational text on the different how the body works and healthy habits.  The type of genre of the book is a science essay.  A science essay is a short piece of nonfiction that explains a specific topic that has to do with science. This science essay tells how parts of the body works. The book starts by reviewing the key vocabulary words regarding the body parts: head, shoulder, arms, hands, legs foots and etc. with a picture to make the input of the language more comprehensible.  The science essay breaks down the body parts into different sections in the book. The first section of the book describes the skeleton, then the body parts, then the heart, following with the blood.  Next the book describes the lungs, then nervous system, after that brain and finally the senses.  The science essay finally ends by describing how to keep the body healthy.  

The unit about health and body is related to English language learners because they know how describe their body parts in the target language.  At the same time students discover that the parts of the body and how they work together to keep us healthy.  This unit will benefit students in the future because they can apply this knowledge to real life situations. They will learn how to identify, describe and model how the human body functions.  It is important for the students to realize how the body functions to help communicate themselves at the doctor’s office, with the school nurse or even at the hospital. Additionally, this unit benefits English language learners, as it helps them learn content-specific vocabulary that they will utilize in their everyday lives. Furthermore, our English language learners will thrive from this unit on health and body because at the conclusion of the unit, the students will create research presentation on a human body system and present to the class. The students will work in groups of 2-3 students to complete the research project.  

The students have previous knowledge on the health and body unit.  In 7th grade students are required to take health for the entire year.  During this class students are exposed to many of the vocabulary words and health issues related to the body.  Front loading the key vocabulary is very important.  Prior to the reading lesson student have been practicing the vocabulary. They created post it note vocabulary using each word. They have the post-it notes in their interactive notebook. Key Words: skeleton, stomach, heart, lungs, muscles, nerves, brain, body system, and human body. On another day students had a class discussion and reviewed the different human body parts using a musical chant: Head, shoulders, knees and toes song.  Students labeled their own body worksheet and described the function of each body part, example head, should, eyes, ear and nose.   Reading “Body Works”: The class read “Body Works” and also listened to the science essay.  As a do now students completed a web diagram on the body parts they knew about. As students read and listen to the science essay, they will complete a main idea chart for each section of the book that illustrates a different body part.  The student will do by completing a jig saw reading assignment.  There will be four groups of four.  The home groups will be the student’s main group in class and the expert group will be divided into 4 sections: the skeleton, the muscles, the heart, and the blood.  Each expert group will read about their body part and find the main idea of that section. Students will then go back to their home group and teach each other about the body part they are experts on.  Students will listen to each classmate and complete a chart for each body part. At the end of the lesson each student will have a main idea diagram completed for each section of the book.  The exit slip will be to write the main idea of each body part: the skeleton, the muscles, the heart and the blood.   

NYS CCSS-ELA Standards:

Reading Standard

CCRA.R.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development ; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. 

CCRA.R.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. 

CCRA.R.10 Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently. 

Writing Standards

CCRA.W.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. 

Speaking and Listening Standards

CCRA.SL.4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style and appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

Language Standards 

CCRA.L.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. 

CCRA.L.6 Acquire and use a range of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when encountering an unknown term important to comprehension or expression. 

Applicable NYS ELL Standards: 

Standard 1 – Social and Instructional Language 
English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting. 

Standard 2 – Language of Language Arts 

English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of language arts. 

Standard 4 – Language of Science
English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of science.

Objectives:

Content Objective: Students will be able to identify main idea about different body parts.

Language Objective: Students will be able to write and say the main idea and supporting details using jigsaw within their groups.

Key Vocabulary:

  • Head
  • Shoulder
  • Arms
  • Eyes
  • Nose
  • Legs
  • Skeleton
  • Heart
  • Muscles
  • Blood

Lesson Format for Body Works:

Essential Question:How does the body work?
Focus Question:What is the main function of each body part?
Academic LanguageUnderstanding the main idea and supporting it with details from the text. 
Guided Questions:What makes your body work??How does each body part work? What is the skeleton?What is muscle contraction?How fast does your heartbeat?What is the circulatory system?
Task:First students will complete the Do now: Complete the web diagram on the body parts that you knowStudents will read and listen to the science essayThey will complete a main idea chart for each section of the book that illustrates a different body part.  The students will do this by completing a jig saw reading assignment.  The class will be divided into four groups of four.  The home groups will be the student’s main group in class and the expert group will be divided into 4 sections: the skeleton, the muscles, the heart, and the blood.  Each expert group will read about their body part and find the main idea of that section. Students will then go back to their home group and teach each other about the body part they are experts on.  Students will listen to each classmate and complete a chart for each body part. At the end of the lesson each student will have a main idea diagram completed for each section of the book.  The exit slip will be to write the main idea of each body part: the skeleton, the muscles, the heart and the blood.   

Bloom’s Knowledge Matrix:

The Knowledge DimensionRememberUnder-standApplyAnalyzeEvaluateCreate
FactslistClassifyDescribeidentifyExplainRelate
ConceptsRecallTranslatePracticePoint outDevelopsupport
ProcessesDescribeIdentifydemonstrateoutlineComposeConclude
ProceduresmatchGive examplesillustrateQuestionCreateInterpret
PrinciplestellRecognizeApplyinfersynthesizeevaluate
MetacognitiveLabelRephraseshowAnalyzeReproduceExplain
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Reference:

Schulman, D. (2014). Escaping Freedom . In Inside: Language, Literacy, Content(pp. 350–357). Monterey, CA: National Geographic Learning/Cengage Learning.

Morris, A. (2013). Families. Columbus, O.H.: Zaner-Bloser.

Moore, D. W., Short, D. J., Smith, M. W., Tatum, A. W., & Villamil Tinajero, J. (2014). Inside: Language, Literacy, Content. Monterey, CA: National Geographic Learning/Cengage Learning

Wheeler, J., & Krames, C. (2000). Body works. Carmel, CA: Hampton-Brown.

Touro College features: Candidate Carmen Montoya’s Digital Portfolio TESOL Website

Practicum Assignment:

Digital Portfolio Project Purpose: The purpose of creating and maintaining an electronic portfolio is for teacher candidates to reflect on the course of study at Touro College. The portfolio should include a statement of the teacher candidates’ goals, philosophy of education, and files that showcase the candidate’s best work. The work selected by the student for the electronic portfolio should be organized and reflected upon.

Artifacts: The electronic portfolio shows examples of different kinds of work such as PowerPoint presentations, Excel files, photograph examples, and Word documents. Be creative: You can showcase anchor charts, word walls, student work (without identifying names), assignments you created, papers you wrote during your course of study, etc.  Each example is accompanied by a short reflection composed by the teacher candidate.

Carmen Montoya is a career changer, who holds a Masters of Science degree, as well as an Initial Certification in Childhood Education and Special Education, Grades 1-6 from the Touro Graduate School of Education. “I am currently pursuing a TESOL Advanced Certificate for grades K-12 at Touro, due to be completed by the fall of 2020. I have spent the past four years working with grades K – 8 in various capacities that have allowed me to serve this student population within instructional, sports, arts, and literacy programs at different times. This phenomenal experience has further reinforced my passion for cultivating academic excellence and character growth among my students, as well as strong interpersonal skills with administration and fellow staff members. I hope to teach for some time, working with students at the grade and middle school levels, and with the adult population in the future. My varied interests are writing children’s fiction, art, history, science, traveling, dance, and music.”

Website: Carmen Montoya for Practicum 680, Touro College, TESOL and Bilingual Department

 

Artificial Intelligence, Augmented Reality, Digital Technologies, and Blockchain: Musings on Education and Language Acquisition in the Digital Age by Dr. Jasmin Bey Cowin

via Artificial Intelligence, Augmented Reality, Digital Technologies, and Blockchain: Musings on Education and Language Acquisition in the Digital Age by Dr. Jasmin Bey Cowin