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Touro College TESOL Candidate Evelyn Ramos’ Materials Critique

Touro TESOL candidate Evelyn Ramos earned a dual bachelor’s degree in Adolescence Education Spanish (7-12) and Spanish Language, Hispanic Literature and Culture. She graduated in 2016 with Cum Laude honors. Her teaching career started 3 years ago in 2017 at Brentwood Union Free School district as a bilingual language teacher. She currently teaches Home Language Arts to 7th & 8th graders at East Middle school. “I choose to return back to Brentwood to give back to the community that gave so much to me. I started my graduate degree in 2017 and will graduate on June 16th, 2020 with a master’s degree in TESOL. I have accomplished all this being a mother to two beautiful girls, a wife, daughter, sister, and granddaughter.”

Touro TESOL candidate Evelyn Ramos earned a dual bachelor’s degree in Adolescence Education Spanish (7-12) and Spanish Language, Hispanic Literature and Culture. She graduated in 2016 with Cum Laude honors. Her teaching career started 3 years ago in 2017 at Brentwood Union Free School district as a bilingual language teacher. She currently teaches Home Language Arts to 7th & 8th graders at East Middle school. “I choose to return back to Brentwood to give back to the community that gave so much to me. I started my graduate degree in 2017 and will graduate on June 16th, 2020 with a master’s degree in TESOL. I have accomplished all this being a mother to two beautiful girls, a wife, daughter, sister, and granddaughter.”

Materials Critique Assignment

Evaluation and Selection

Choose 3 chapters/sections OR 3 books (either from a textbook series, library, or a set of supplemental texts to review). Prepare a written description minimum 2 pages per chapter/book/resource and critique of the material or resource, analyzing its effectiveness for ELL students.

You will need to answer to each

  • Level of content familiarity or background knowledge
  • Level of language
  • Level of textual support
  • Level of cultural fit
  • Redesign one section/activity of the original material so that it meets the need of ELLs.

Level of content familiarity or background knowledge

How close a fit is the text to the English learner’s content knowledge or background experiences?

  • What content and concepts are presented in the text? What is the content/conceptual load of the text? Basic and familiar? New but general? New and specialized?
  • Is this presentation an introduction to the content and concepts or is it continued conceptual development at a higher level?
  • What is the English learner’s level of content familiarity or background knowledge related to the content and concepts? Is the concept very familiar, familiar, unfamiliar, or not common?

Submission: Student Background

For this material critique, I observed three different teachers. I choose one book from the 6th-grade entering class, one book from the 7th grade emerging/transitioning course, and one both from the 8th grade emerging/transitioning class. The 8th-grade class is made up of five students. All students are in the 8th grade and are Spanish speaking students who are from Honduras, Ecuador, and El Salvador. The six students are classified as English language learners. They are classified at the emerging, transitioning, and expanding performance level; three students are transitioning, two students are emerging, and one student is expanding. Students a heterogeneously grouped by their language proficiency in the target language and academic knowledge in their home language. All of them have been in-country and in a U.S. school setting for less than 3 to 4 years. They have developed literacy skills in both their native and English language. However, all six students feel more comfortable in their native language than English. An exceptionality in the class is that the expanding student was in an integrated ELA class. Still, the ELA/ENL teacher recommends that the student be placed back into a stand-alone ENL/ELA class due to her language proficiency. Class is made up of 6 students in a stand-alone ENL/ELA setting. In this setting, there is one teacher dual certified in ELA & ENL. All instructions take place within the classroom during a block of two periods (45 minutes each). Students sit in tables of 2 or 3 and work in pairs. The co-operating teacher uses peer editing, pair-work, turn & talk, visual aids, and gallery walk to help students comprehend the target language. 

The 6th-grade class is made up of twelve students. All students are in the 6th grade and are Spanish speaking students who are from Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador. The twelve students are classified as English language learners. They are classified at the entering performance level. Students are heterogeneously grouped by their language proficiency in their target language and academic knowledge in the home language. All of them have been in-country and in a U.S. school setting for less than one year. Students can speak and read well in their native language. However, their writing skills are weak in their native language. Class is made up of 12 students in a stand-alone ENL/ELA setting. In this setting, there is one teacher dual certified in ELA & ENL. All instructions take place within the classroom during one period (45 minutes). Students sit in tables of 5 or 6 and work in pairs. Students feel more comfortable using the native language, and the co-operating teacher uses cognates, visual aids, and TPS to help the students understand the target language. 

The 7th-grade class is made up of sixteen students. All students are in the 7th grade and are Spanish speaking students, who are from Honduras, Guatemala, Dominican Republic, and El Salvador. The fifteen students are classified as English language learners. They are classified at the emerging and transitioning performance level; 10 students are transitioning, and six students are emerging. Students are heterogeneously grouped by their language proficiency in their target language and academic knowledge in the home language. All of them have been in-country and in a U.S. school setting for 1-3 years. Students can speak and read well in their native language. However, their writing skills are weak in their native language. Class is made up of 16 students in a stand-alone ENL/ELA setting. In this setting, there is one teacher dual certified in ELA & ENL. All instructions take place within the classroom during a block of two periods (45 minutes each). Students sit in groups of 3 to 5 and work in pairs. Students feel more comfortable using the native language, and the co-operating teacher uses cognates, visual aids, and TPS to help the students understand the target language. 

Students are in a Bilingual/ENL program. The school is part of the Brentwood School District- East Middle School on Long Island, 6th, 7th, and 8th grade ELA/ENL classes. The school is located in a suburban community in which the majority of the community members are Hispanic and from different Latin American countries.       

Escaping to Freedom by Daniel Schulman- 8th grade

The first text I choose to talk about for this assignment is the biography “Escaping Freedom” by Daniel Schulman. This text is a narrated biography on Josiah Henson, a runaway slave escaping to freedom. The biography narratives how Josiah left the plantation with his family in search of freedom. If he did not do so, he would have been sold away and separated from his family. The text describes how the family traveled to the “promised land” and became free. The biography shows cause and effect through the text and repeats the academic vocabulary numerous times. In addition, the biography illustrates how the slaves had to use the underground railroad and left their homes with nothing but a small bag. The biography is accompanied by many pictures and illiterates that allow the students to comprehended what they are reading.

Seeking freedom and escaping freedom is a topic that not only English language learners can relate to but also students who are native speakers of English. English language learners can also relate to their personal/family experiences. Previously, the students have learned how freedom is a privilege that many people fought for throughout history. They have been exposed to the academic vocabulary and the short story “Escaping Freedom.” The gallery walk will help students visualize what many people had to go through during the time of slavery in this country. Students will go on a gallery walk around the classroom and view pictures related to the story “Escaping Freedom” and slavery. Students will answer questions about the photos.

The unit on freedom will involve teaching students about freedom, who the important historical figures of seeking freedom are, and how freedom affects our everyday lives. Several students in this class can relate to the political issues that arise in today’s society. This unit will benefit students in the future because they can apply this knowledge to real-life situations. They will learn that discrimination continues to occur in today’s societies. Students need to realize the level of freedom in different areas of the world. Additionally, this unit benefits English language learners, as it helps them learn content-specific vocabulary that they will utilize in their everyday lives. Furthermore, our English language learners will thrive from this unit on freedom because, at the end of the unit, the students will celebrate their work by presenting their essay or PowerPoint on a historical individual who fought for civil rights. Each student or pair of students will share their projects with their peers.

           The students have previous knowledge of different historical people or figures in their own country who have fought for freedom. As well as background knowledge from their social studies class on slavery and the search to escape to freedom. Front-loading essential vocabulary: before the lesson student has been practicing the vocabulary. They created post-it note vocabulary using each word. They have the post-it notes in their interactive notebook. Key Words: Assist, Capture, Escape, Freedom, Reward, Right, Slave, and travel. On another day, students had a class discussion and used accountable talk to discuss freedom and rights using the academic vocabulary. Students used the vocabulary to express and answer questions regarding their experience with freedom and rights. Reading “Escaping to Freedom.” The class has read “Escaping to Freedom” and also listened to the story. On a separate day, students have a class discussion about the cause and effect that the story provided about the main character. The teacher also went over how the key vocabulary was used in context with the story. Students will have a class discussion about what life was like during that period in history, for example, plantation life and home life. They used the 3 new things I discovered, 2 interesting facts I learned, 1 question I still have… model to discuss the lifestyle during that period. The students will then complete a gallery walk on the story to further understand as to why people escaped to freedom during the slavery era. The gallery walk will help students visualize what many people had to go through during the time of slavery in this country. Students will go on a gallery walk around the classroom and view pictures related to the story “Escaping to Freedom” and slavery. Students will answer questions related to the picture and story. The gallery walk integrates all language skills. Students will have to listen to their peers’ ideas regarding the picture, share their opinion by stating it to their peers using the target and L1 language. Also, students will have to read each prompt/question and write down their answers on the worksheet. Accountable talk sentence frames have been provided to help students communicate in the target language and support in the native language. Students had access to their interactive notebook with reference to the key vocabulary. Students have prior experience using stations and gallery walks in their class. Students have expressed interest in working in groups and learning through gallery walks.  

Students are grouped in cooperative learning groups because they can work together and help each other. 

The students are grouped primarily by their target language proficiency level involving comprehension as well as their academic knowledge in their native language. Students will also have a do now, which consists of a quick write called Collins Writing. Collins writing is used across the curriculum. This type of writing allows the learner to understand and remember the content being introduced to them. 

NYS ELA Standards:

Reading Standards for Informational text 

RI. 6.2 Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.

RI. 6.5 Analyze how a particular sentence, paragraph, chapter, or section fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of ideas. 

Writing Standards

W. 6.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. 

W. 6.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (times for research, reflection, and revision) and short time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Speaking and Listening Standards

SL. 6.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 6 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

SL. 6.2 Interpret information presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how it contributes to a topic, text, or issue under study. 

Language Standards 

L. 6.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. 

L. 6.6 Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. 

Applicable NYS ELL Standards: 

Standard 1 – Social and Instructional Language 

 English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting. 

Standard 2 – Language of Language Arts 

English language learners communicate information, ideas, and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of language arts. 

Standard 5 – Language of Social Studies 

 English language learners communicate information, ideas, and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of social studies. 

Objectives:

Content Objective: Students will be able to discover the risks people took to free themselves and to help others gain freedom.

Language Objective: Students will be able to respond to and interpret visuals on escaping to freedom using academic vocabulary.

Key Vocabulary:

  • Assist
  • Capture
  • Escape
  • Freedom
  • Reward
  • Right
  • Slave 
  • Travel

Lesson format for : Escaping to Freedom by Daniel Schulman:

Essential Question:What risks did salves take to escape slavery?
Focus Question:How did slaves escape to gain freedom?
Academic LanguageStudents will use the key vocabulary to discuss why and how slaves escaped to freedom.
Guided Questions/Prompts:Write down as many words as you can to describe this picture.What do you notice about the traveling family?What did enslaved people and those who helped them risk by using the underground railroad?What would you do if you came across a runaway slave like Harriet Tubman? Use academic vocabulary: assist, freedom, slave, capture
Task:Warm Up –The class will complete the Do Now- Type 1 Collins Writing- Look at the wagon and objects (Cotton and Crops) on the table.  In three lines describe what you see.  The we will share out the responses. Class discussion (Teacher led)– We will go over the do now and discuss the ideas that the students came up on with the during the quick write.  The wagon and crops will be used to active prior knowledge on plantation life.Word presentation on the Aquos Interactive Board will review the agenda for the day and the step by step instructions for the gallery walk.   Think-a-loud will be used also to model how to think through the process. Teacher will also model how to use the accountable talk sheet.  Teacher will tell the students to reference their interactive notebook for the key vocabulary words.Students will go on a gallery walk around the classroom and view pictures related to the story “Escaping to Freedom” and slavery. Students will answer questions related to the picture and/or story. The gallery walk integrates all language skills.  Students will have to listen to their peers’ ideas regarding the picture, share their idea by stating it to their peer using the target and L1 language. In addition, students will have to read each prompt/question and write down their answers on the worksheet. After students will work in groups to share their ideas and explanation of each prompt/image.  Students will have the opportunity to learn and teach each other the how to respond the question and interpret the image.  In their group’s students will share their response, review and reflect on each other’s answers. Groups –  Students are heterogeneously grouped by their language proficiency in their target language and academic knowledge in the home language.   Students are grouped in cooperative learning groups, because they are able to work together and help each other.  The group will primarily be working on a think-pair-share assignment. Closure – Will review and have a class discussion on the gallery walk.  Students will share their answers and ideas with the class.  We will end the class reflecting on what we learned today and throughout the week on the topic escaping to freedom.I will close the lesson by handing out the exit slip and explaining the homework.  Students will have to complete the selection review worksheet- page 185 from their practice workbook.  

Bloom’s Knowledge Matrix:

The Knowledge DimensionRememberUnder-standApplyAnalyzeEvaluateCreate
Factslistdescribeinterpretidentifysummarizerelate
Conceptsrecallexplainapplydistinguishreorganizeconclude
Processesnamecontrastorganizeexamineopinionconstruct
Proceduresoutlineexplainwritepoint outcategorizemodel
Principlestellinterpretmodelcomparedetermineselect
Metacognitiveretellinferconstructclassifyconcludeelaborate
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Families by Ann Morris- 6th grade

The next book I chose to talk about is Families by Ann Morris. This book explains the different members of a family.  This book is a non-fiction informational text on the different kinds of families in the world.  The type of genre of the book is a photo essay.  A photo is a short piece of non-fiction. It uses photographs to give information about the topic. This photo essay is about families. The starts by reviewing the key vocabulary words regarding the family members: grandpa, grandma, uncle, aunt, cousin, father, mother, sister, brother, me, and together with a picture to make the input of the language more understandable.  The photo essay continues to explain all the things families do together.  Some of the things, families do together help another, work, play, cook, eat, and celebrate.  Finally, the photo essay ends, showing that children live in many kinds of families and that families are unique in many different ways.  One thing families have in common is that they love, share, and care for each family member no matter where in the world you are from. 

 The unit about home and family is related to English language learners.  ELLs know how to describe their home and family in the target language.  At the same time, students discover that families are all unique and look different in their own special way.  This unit will benefit students in the future because they can apply this knowledge to real-life situations. They will learn how to identify, describe, and model how their house looks like and construct their family tree.  It is essential for the students to realize the families are made up of different family members and that families care, share, and love for one another in all areas of the world. Additionally, this unit benefits English language learners, as it helps them learn content-specific vocabulary that they will utilize in their everyday lives. Furthermore, our English language learners will thrive from this unit on home and family because, at the end of the unit, the students will celebrate their work by presenting their PowerPoint on their home here and in their home country and family tree. Each student will share their project with the class or within their group.

The students have previous knowledge of the structure of the house and household items.  Students also have prior experience in their native language, the names of members that make up a family, as well as background knowledge from their Home language arts class on autobiography and personal narrative unit.  I also front-loaded the key vocabulary words before the lesson.  Students have been practicing the vocabulary words by mix and matching the words with the picture and home language translation. For example, the word family would be matched with the picture labeled “familia.”  Students also completed a rating scale for the vocabulary words than answered questions to deepen their understanding of the word. Key Words: family, together, parents, grandma, grandpa, uncle, aunt, cousin, father, mother, sister, brother, and me. Before the lesson, students had a class discussion on the family tree using the academic vocabulary.  Students used the vocabulary to complete the family tree of the Lin Family and answer questions regarding their family.  Reading “Families”: The class has read “Families” and also listened to the photo essay.  As students read and listen to the photo essay, they completed two diagrams to tell about main ideas of Families.  The main idea is given to the student. However, as they read, the learners need to find details to support the main idea.  The first main idea is that families do a lot of things together. The second main idea is that children live in many kinds of families.  Students will listen to the story as a class. Then with their group re-read the story and complete the main idea diagrams.  Once they completed the main idea diagrams the students will work with their partner to create a chant about their family.  At the end of the lesson, the students will read their chant and realize that everyone has a family, but each of them is unique and special in their own way.  Students are grouped in cooperative learning groups because they can work together and help each other.  The students are grouped primarily by their target language proficiency level involving comprehension as well as their academic knowledge in their native language.

NYS CCSS-ELA Standards:

Reading Standard

CCRA.R.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development ; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. 

CCRA.R.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. 

CCRA.R.10 Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently. 

Writing Standards

CCRA.W.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. 

Speaking and Listening Standards

CCRA.SL.4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style and appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

Language Standards 

CCRA.L.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. 

CCRA.L.6 Acquire and use a range of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when encountering an unknown term important to comprehension or expression. 

Applicable NYS ELL Standards: 

Standard 1 – Social and Instructional Language 
English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting. 

Standard 2 – Language of Language Arts 

English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of language arts. 

Standard 5 – Language of Social Studies 
English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of social studies. 

Objectives:

Content Objective: Students will be able to identify details that support the main idea about families.

Language Objective: Students will be able to write the supporting details in the main idea diagram and say a chant using words about their family.

Key Vocabulary:

  • Family
  • Together
  • Parents
  • Grandmother
  • Grandfather
  • Uncle
  • Aunt
  • Cousin
  • Father
  • Mother
  • Sister
  • Brother
  • Me

Lesson Format for Families:

Essential Question:Are all families the same?
Focus Question:What is your family like?
Academic LanguageUnderstanding the main idea and supporting it with details from the text. 
Guided Questions:What things do families do together?Do all children live in the same kind of family? How many family members are in your family?
Task:As a class we will read and listen to the photo essay on families. Then within their groups they will complete the main idea diagrams. Teacher will assist both groups as they complete the main idea diagrams. Each student will complete a chant about their family. 1. List their family members. Examples: grandmother, brothers2. Tell more about them. Tell how many. Examples: One grandma, two brothers Students will then write a chant. Tell about your family. 

Bloom’s Knowledge Matrix:

The Knowledge DimensionRememberUnder-standApplyAnalyzeEvaluateCreate
Factsrecalldescribeinterpretidentifysummarizejustify
Conceptsidentifyexplainapplybreakdownwritesupport
Processeslistexpressdemonstrateoutlinedevelopconstruct
Proceduresmatchidentifyillustratepoint outcategorizemodel
Principlestellinterpretmodelcomparedetermineselect
Metacognitivedefinedistinguishshowanalyzeexplainelaborate
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Body Works by Janine Wheeler- 7th grade

The last book I choose to talk about is Body Works by Janine Wheeler. This book explains the different parts of the body.  This book is a non-fiction informational text on the different how the body works and healthy habits.  The type of genre of the book is a science essay.  A science essay is a short piece of nonfiction that explains a specific topic that has to do with science. This science essay tells how parts of the body works. The book starts by reviewing the key vocabulary words regarding the body parts: head, shoulder, arms, hands, legs foots and etc. with a picture to make the input of the language more comprehensible.  The science essay breaks down the body parts into different sections in the book. The first section of the book describes the skeleton, then the body parts, then the heart, following with the blood.  Next the book describes the lungs, then nervous system, after that brain and finally the senses.  The science essay finally ends by describing how to keep the body healthy.  

The unit about health and body is related to English language learners because they know how describe their body parts in the target language.  At the same time students discover that the parts of the body and how they work together to keep us healthy.  This unit will benefit students in the future because they can apply this knowledge to real life situations. They will learn how to identify, describe and model how the human body functions.  It is important for the students to realize how the body functions to help communicate themselves at the doctor’s office, with the school nurse or even at the hospital. Additionally, this unit benefits English language learners, as it helps them learn content-specific vocabulary that they will utilize in their everyday lives. Furthermore, our English language learners will thrive from this unit on health and body because at the conclusion of the unit, the students will create research presentation on a human body system and present to the class. The students will work in groups of 2-3 students to complete the research project.  

The students have previous knowledge on the health and body unit.  In 7th grade students are required to take health for the entire year.  During this class students are exposed to many of the vocabulary words and health issues related to the body.  Front loading the key vocabulary is very important.  Prior to the reading lesson student have been practicing the vocabulary. They created post it note vocabulary using each word. They have the post-it notes in their interactive notebook. Key Words: skeleton, stomach, heart, lungs, muscles, nerves, brain, body system, and human body. On another day students had a class discussion and reviewed the different human body parts using a musical chant: Head, shoulders, knees and toes song.  Students labeled their own body worksheet and described the function of each body part, example head, should, eyes, ear and nose.   Reading “Body Works”: The class read “Body Works” and also listened to the science essay.  As a do now students completed a web diagram on the body parts they knew about. As students read and listen to the science essay, they will complete a main idea chart for each section of the book that illustrates a different body part.  The student will do by completing a jig saw reading assignment.  There will be four groups of four.  The home groups will be the student’s main group in class and the expert group will be divided into 4 sections: the skeleton, the muscles, the heart, and the blood.  Each expert group will read about their body part and find the main idea of that section. Students will then go back to their home group and teach each other about the body part they are experts on.  Students will listen to each classmate and complete a chart for each body part. At the end of the lesson each student will have a main idea diagram completed for each section of the book.  The exit slip will be to write the main idea of each body part: the skeleton, the muscles, the heart and the blood.   

NYS CCSS-ELA Standards:

Reading Standard

CCRA.R.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development ; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. 

CCRA.R.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. 

CCRA.R.10 Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently. 

Writing Standards

CCRA.W.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. 

Speaking and Listening Standards

CCRA.SL.4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style and appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

Language Standards 

CCRA.L.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. 

CCRA.L.6 Acquire and use a range of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when encountering an unknown term important to comprehension or expression. 

Applicable NYS ELL Standards: 

Standard 1 – Social and Instructional Language 
English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting. 

Standard 2 – Language of Language Arts 

English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of language arts. 

Standard 4 – Language of Science
English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of science.

Objectives:

Content Objective: Students will be able to identify main idea about different body parts.

Language Objective: Students will be able to write and say the main idea and supporting details using jigsaw within their groups.

Key Vocabulary:

  • Head
  • Shoulder
  • Arms
  • Eyes
  • Nose
  • Legs
  • Skeleton
  • Heart
  • Muscles
  • Blood

Lesson Format for Body Works:

Essential Question:How does the body work?
Focus Question:What is the main function of each body part?
Academic LanguageUnderstanding the main idea and supporting it with details from the text. 
Guided Questions:What makes your body work??How does each body part work? What is the skeleton?What is muscle contraction?How fast does your heartbeat?What is the circulatory system?
Task:First students will complete the Do now: Complete the web diagram on the body parts that you knowStudents will read and listen to the science essayThey will complete a main idea chart for each section of the book that illustrates a different body part.  The students will do this by completing a jig saw reading assignment.  The class will be divided into four groups of four.  The home groups will be the student’s main group in class and the expert group will be divided into 4 sections: the skeleton, the muscles, the heart, and the blood.  Each expert group will read about their body part and find the main idea of that section. Students will then go back to their home group and teach each other about the body part they are experts on.  Students will listen to each classmate and complete a chart for each body part. At the end of the lesson each student will have a main idea diagram completed for each section of the book.  The exit slip will be to write the main idea of each body part: the skeleton, the muscles, the heart and the blood.   

Bloom’s Knowledge Matrix:

The Knowledge DimensionRememberUnder-standApplyAnalyzeEvaluateCreate
FactslistClassifyDescribeidentifyExplainRelate
ConceptsRecallTranslatePracticePoint outDevelopsupport
ProcessesDescribeIdentifydemonstrateoutlineComposeConclude
ProceduresmatchGive examplesillustrateQuestionCreateInterpret
PrinciplestellRecognizeApplyinfersynthesizeevaluate
MetacognitiveLabelRephraseshowAnalyzeReproduceExplain
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Reference:

Schulman, D. (2014). Escaping Freedom . In Inside: Language, Literacy, Content(pp. 350–357). Monterey, CA: National Geographic Learning/Cengage Learning.

Morris, A. (2013). Families. Columbus, O.H.: Zaner-Bloser.

Moore, D. W., Short, D. J., Smith, M. W., Tatum, A. W., & Villamil Tinajero, J. (2014). Inside: Language, Literacy, Content. Monterey, CA: National Geographic Learning/Cengage Learning

Wheeler, J., & Krames, C. (2000). Body works. Carmel, CA: Hampton-Brown.

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Artificial Intelligence, Augmented Reality, Digital Technologies, and Blockchain: Musings on Education and Language Acquisition in the Digital Age by Dr. Jasmin Bey Cowin

Gen Z and Gen Alpha continue to drive the expansion of augmented reality digital technologies (ARDTs) into all industries from corporate environments and marketing to health care, from gaming to language acquisition. Location-independent virtual environments hold the promise of exponential expansion beyond the brick-and-mortar presence of schools, colleges, universities, and other institutions of learning, such as virtual schools and universities.

GenZfinal

It is my great pleasure to share  my newest publication “Artificial Intelligence, Augmented Reality, Digital Technologies, and Blockchain: Musings on Education and Language Acquisition in the Digital Age”, JAN 16, 2020by LONDON-TVin BUSINESS

Artificial Intelligence, Augmented Reality, Digital Technologies, and Blockchain: Musings on Education and Language Acquisition in the Digital Age

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Reflections on Educational Equality for Students with Disabilities by Touro TESOL teacher candidate Kevin Mongan

As a Professor for TESOL and Bilingual Education, I focus on different domains during our semester-long journey.  This blog features Touro TESOL teacher candidate Kevin Mongan, a Social Studies Teacher from Sachem Central School District. He is seeking his TESOL Certificate to better assist his English Language Learner population and better himself as an educator. He appreciates the hard work and dedication of the Touro College Faculty and Staff.

This weeks focus are on:

Domain 2 – Culture (TESOL Domains )
Standard: Nature and Role of Culture

Candidates know, understand, and use the major concepts, principles, theories, and
research related to the nature and role of culture in language development and
academic achievement that support individual students’ learning.

Domain 3: Planning, Implementing, and Managing Instruction
Standard: Planning for Standards-Based ESL and Content Instruction
Candidates know, understand, and apply concepts, research, and best practices to
plan classroom instruction in a supportive learning environment for ESOL students.
Candidates serve as effective English-language models, as they plan for multilevel
classrooms with learners from diverse backgrounds using standards-based ESL and
content curriculum.

Reflective Journal:

In “Chapter 13: Educational Equality for Students with Disabilities,” written by Sara C. Bicard and William L. Heward, Multicultural Education: Issues and Perspectives by James A. Banks and Cherry A. McGee Banks, the reader is posed with a question that reaches into the core of every teacher: Am I providing ALL of my students with the best education I can provide for them? The authors present a statement very early in their piece:

The skill differences among most children are relatively small, allowing these children to benefit from the general education program offered by their schools. When the physical, social, and academic skills of children differ to such an extent that typical school curricula or teaching methods are neither appropriate nor effective, however, equitable access to and benefits from educational programs are at stake. (Bicard, p. 315)

Every teacher has had at least one moment where they asked themselves, am I doing enough? When students with disabilities, whether physical, social, or academic, are not being given the proper tools to succeed in their learning environment, they will not succeed. It is up to the classroom teacher, administration, family at home, and the students to make sure that their needs for success are constantly being maintained inside and outside of the classroom.

color coded 3
The authors explain how students with disabilities are identified and classified, how students with disabilities do not benefit from a single change to the classroom environment, and also, how not all students with disabilities will benefit from the same accommodations. The classification system for students with disabilities is often targeted as a problem than as a system that can lead to solutions. “Some educators believe the classification and labeling of exceptional students serve only to stigmatize and exclude them from the mainstream of educational opportunities” (p. 319). “Others argue that a workable system of classification is necessary to obtain the special education services and programs that are prerequisite to educational equality for exceptional students” (p. 319.) If labels and classifications are not present, how can general education teachers, special education teachers, parents, various professionals whose sole duty is to help the child, communicate common goals for the student? Real issues need real solutions and without having a real comprehension of the task at hand for all parties involved, the student can never benefit from any services provided because there would be no goal to reach or endgame in sight.

The authors then embark on a legislative study on how students with disabilities have been treated in the public education system of the United States. When students with disabilities were brought into public schools they were immediately judged and labeled, often cast aside and not granted access to the public school system. Students were labeled by their teachers as “slow learners” and “disciplinary problems” when they would act out in class, from the frustration of not understanding the material (p.320-321). In Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka (1954), “the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that education must be available to all children on equal terms and that is unconstitutional to operate segregated schools under the premise that they are separate but equal” (p. 321). For most students and teachers, this case falls under the constructs of African-Americans and the Civil Rights Movement, however, to parents of children with disabilities, this ruling pushed the door wide open for students with disabilities to have the right for the best education they can receive in their local public school district. Laws would be created to further protect the right and liberties of those with disabilities, but under the amendments of the Education for All Handicapped Children Act, which renamed it the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), it “ensure[s] the rights of students with disabilities to a free appropriate public education, including early intervention services, and to provide the necessary supports for oversight for states, districts, schools, and educators to improve the educational results for students with disabilities” (p.322).

The final area of concern for the authors is the inequality and discrimination that students from “culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds” often face in special education. They are often overrepresented or underrepresented. The authors ask educators to focus on three specifics when it comes to students of culturally and linguistically diverse students: the assessment and placement procedures are sensitive to the student’s culture and language, appropriate services are provided to that students with their linguistic and cultural needs in mind, and lastly, that teachers and other professionals who work with the student understand the student’s culture and home values. “The instructional materials that educators use and the methods that they employ while teaching must be responsive to the differing cultural backgrounds of their students” (p. 334). Every professional that interacts with students with disabilities must contribute to the betterment of the students’ lives. It requires work on the professional’s part: not just teaching the curriculum as is, but adapting the curriculum every day to fit the needs of their student’s body. Respectful and sensitive teachers will make the special education setting a more trustworthy and worthwhile environment for students with disabilities.

2) Initial Emotional Response:
I have always found that pieces about students with disabilities always bring out a passion within me as an educator. I believe the root of passion is frustration. I try to provide my students with the best education possible and I know there is nothing I can control about what has happened before they walk through my classroom door, but I always encourage them to be the best students they can be, to always ask for help if they need it, and to truly give it their all. In turn, I will provide them with the best education I can. I know that not all teachers extend so much of themselves into the classroom and into the lives of their students but at least I know I am doing my part. We, as educators, always need to be advocates for our students. If they are struggling, our job is to get down to the root of the problem. Why are they struggling, what can I help them with, where can I access resources to provide them with the help that they need? All of these questions should flow through the mind of a passionate educator when their students struggle. To quote Bicard, “Good teachers must…be responsive to changes (or lack of changes) in individual students’ performance” (p. 334). We always need to be invested in the betterment of the lives of our students. If we are not, why do we do it?

3) Prior Assumption/Opinion
As an educator, I had always assumed that students with disabilities have been slowly but surely been granted the rights to an equal and equitable public education over time. Just African-Americans, women, and Native Americans had to wait for the right to vote, as African-Americans had to wait for equal access to public education, and as Civil Liberties were protected under the law for all Americans, students with disabilities received equal protection under the law as people fought for the rights of their children and their students. In a country where “all men are created equal,” it is often forgotten that most Americans had to wait, fight, and wait a little longer to be fully protected by the legislative body of the U.S. government.

4) Source of Assumption
As a social studies teacher, I discuss the protection of freedoms regularly. But rarely do we discuss the freedoms of the student or the freedoms of the education that we are entitled to as Americans. We have to consistently wait for, fight for, and plead for equality across all facets of American life, but at least we know, that all have access to a free, public education. It is what we do with that access that defines our futures.
5) Assumption Check
According to Bicard and Williams, “Teachers must have the knowledge and skills to recognize and to be instructionally responsive to the diversity their students represent…[the chapter] lays the foundations for teachers to examine educational equity for learners with diverse skills” (p. 316). Most teachers assume they can spot a student’s issues or disabilities from a specific assessment or from simple encounters with the student. Educators understand that students with disabilities have rights, but teachers have the responsibility to make sure that those rights are not only be protected, but they are being fulfilled through every single school day for the betterment of the lives of their students. Educators must continue to challenge the educational hierarchy so that they can provide their students with most fair educational system that can be created. Bicard and Williams said, “All students are alike in that they can benefit from an appropriate education that enables them to do things they were previously unable to do and to do things with greater independence and enjoyment” (p. 317). If educators can provide their students with the skills and necessaries to become as independent of the teacher as possible, lifelong learners can be created and nurtured.

6) Realization (Epiphany):
Educators need to always fight for the rights of their students. If teachers can unite under a common banner of student equity and teacher responsibility for their students, then teachers will work harder for their students. Teachers should not be judged for how their students perform on tests, teachers should be observed and guided toward creating a more positive, nurturing, and safe learning environment for their students. Encourage teachers to get to know their kids, to invite students up to their classrooms to eat lunch, to actively seek out parental involvement rather than avoiding them like the plague. Teachers should not be in the profession for the paycheck. They should be in the profession to foster passion in their subject area, to provoke thought, to provoke future citizenry and change, and to create future leaders of the world. The first thing that teachers need to do, as a whole, is a smile. Too many educators walk through the halls with a look of gloom and dissatisfaction on their faces. Say hello to a student, a colleague, a custodian, a secretary, and if you can’t take the moment to get a word out of your mouth, at least smile.
7) Implication of Future Teaching Practice:
Making sure every single one of our students has access to every resource we can guarantee them. Making sure our culturally and linguistically diverse student populations have the resources they need to succeed, not only within the four walls of the classroom, but in every hallway, every room, and in every step, they take inside and outside of school. Students from diverse backgrounds need to know where to access resources that can assist them and their families whenever they want them. A true teacher makes time for all of their students and makes time to make sure that all of their students are being taken care of. We may not have control over what happens in our students’ lives when they walk out of our classrooms, but we can encourage them to seek assistance, show them where resources are, and be a resource for them whenever they need it. I know that I can become better by making sure all of my students’ needs are being met. I do not keep a good record of the resources my students utilize and the accommodations that my students utilize as well. We often find ourselves separated from the other departments, but just as Bicard said, “our kids,” is becoming and needs to continue becoming the terminology used when describing our student body, if we truly want to watch a positive learning environment take hold.

References
Banks, J. A., & Banks, C. A. M. G. (2004). Multicultural education: Issues and perspectives. Hoboken, N.J: Wiley.

Featured

An Exploration of Learning and Teaching in 3D Immersive Environments: Transcending Boundaries, Immersive Technology Trends

Attractive online programs are not aggregations of online courses filled with PDF documents, short video clips and discussion boards all housed in modules, featuring standardized learning objectives, extensive rubrics (and possibly chatbots in the future). In such environments individualized student teaching and learning is sacrificed on the altar of efficiency and standardization.

https://learningandteachingexchange.wordpress.com/2019/03/14/an-exploration-of-learning-and-teaching-in-3d-immersive-environments-transcending-boundaries-immersive-technology-trends/

Jasmin Cowin, Ed.D.
Assistant Professor, TESOL and Bilingual Programs
Graduate School of Education

Fluentworld

The Fork in the Road

It started with Minecraft and my son. His fascination and hours of focus on and in Minecraft, paying little attention to all the lovingly displayed books on his bedroom bookshelf drove me to shock, denial, anger, bargaining, depression and finally acceptance. Realizing that I would not win this particular battle, I decided to join him on his Minecraft, Mario and Pokémon forays. His total focus, relentless research into different winning or creation strategies, and astonishingly deft manipulation of objects in 3D environments, created an increasing fascination of these gaming technologies, nascent virtual spaces, open simulation environments and their possible future impact on institutions of learning, teachers, and learners.

Attractive Online Programs

As higher education is under increasing demographic and financial pressure, the forecast looks grim. The survey How Enrollment Challenges Can Spur Change released by the Chronicle of Higher Education, January 2018, found that 52 percent of private colleges and 44 percent of public colleges didn’t meet their enrollment goals in fall 2017. Thriving in a competitive atmosphere for student enrollment “the most popular responses to enrollment and revenue shortfalls remained the same: Start attractive new programs, improve enrollment strategies, and pump up marketing.”

Attractive online programs are not aggregations of online courses filled with PDF documents, short video clips and discussion boards all housed in modules, featuring standardized learning objectives, extensive rubrics (and possibly chatbots in the future). In such environments individualized student teaching and learning is sacrificed on the altar of efficiency and standardization.  Attractive online learning programs need to connect with students through better tools to support experiential learning, “the process whereby knowledge is created through the transformation of experience. Knowledge results from the combinations of grasping and transforming the experience.” (Kolb) While the current ed tech field is populated with many contenders (and expensive losers), I chose to focus on six current trends at the forefront of teaching and training simulations.

Dr. J’s Six Trends

Augmented Analytics focuses on a specific area of augmented intelligence, using machine learning (ML) to transform how analytics content is developed, consumed and shared. One day, data storytelling might become ubiquitous in Virtual Worlds (VW’s) democratizing “data visualization with narrative techniques across multiple experiences and channels.” https://www.gartner.com/webinar/3900998?pcp=wb_ddc&srcId=1-3478922220

360° photos are controllable panoramic images that surround the original point from which the shot was taken. Essentially, they are situating the learner in the shoes of a photographer, allowing a look around a photographed setting as if in the middle of it. 360-degree photograph

360° videos, a fairly recent technology, enables learners to not only look around and interact with the setting, as in the case of 360° photos, but place “the viewer within the context of a scene or event rather than presenting them as an outside observer, and giving the viewer the ability to control the orientation of the scene and viewing direction.” https://studio.knightlab.com/results/storytelling-layers-on-360-video/an-introduction-to-360-video/

3D simulations are computer-generated environments, recreating lifelike experiences where learners freely interact with objects in the 3D simulation. Learners “gain hands-on training to quickly master new knowledge needed to perform certain tasks, either completely new or part of increased job responsibilities.” https://blog.matrixlms.com/5-types-immersive-technology-training/

Virtual Reality (VR) needs a VR headset which immerses the learner in the 3D environment, a Virtual World (VW). VW’s are becoming increasingly popular not only for gaming but also for teaching and learning in schools, professional environments, colleges and universities worldwide. According to Educational Virtual Environments “Virtual Reality (VR) immersive technologies support the creation of synthetic, highly interactive three dimensional (3D) spatial environments that represent real or non-real situations” (Mikropoulos and Natsis, 2010, p. 769).

MR (Mixed Reality) takes VR a step even further, as it introduces elements of Augmented Reality (AR)  in learning environments. AR’s “primary objective is to provide a rich audiovisual experience. AR works by employing computerized simulation and techniques such as image and speech recognition, animation, head-mounted and hand-held devices and powered display environments to add a virtual display on top of real images and surroundings.” https://www.techopedia.com/definition/4776/augmented-reality-ar

IN JokaidiaGRID

Richly conceived 3D environments feature all 7 e-learning affordances and lend themselves to a more communicative approach and the flipped classroom model. Unique technological characteristics such as the creation of 3D spatial representations, multisensory channels for user interaction and intuitive interaction through natural manipulations in real time enable more holistic teaching and  learning experiences. While the field is not quite there yet in terms of full online immersion teaching spaces, it is at the cusp of viability.  Working in beta spaces carries risks and rewards.  Risks are limited functionality, tech issues, and a learning curve for institutions, facilitators and students. However, creating novel tech experiences in 3D environments prepares not only students but also institutions for  the Fourth Industrial Revolution which according to Klaus Schwab ” is characterized by a range of new technologies that are fusing the physical, digital and biological worlds, impacting all disciplines, economies and industries, and even challenging ideas about what it means to be human.”

Works Cited

B, Livia. “5 Types of Immersive Technology for Training.” MATRIX Blog, MATRIX, 19 Mar. 2018, blog.matrixlms.com/5-types-immersive-technology-training/.

Carlson, Scott. “How Enrollment Challenges Can Spur Change.” The Chronicle of Higher Education, The Chronicle of Higher Education, 21 Jan. 2018, http://www.chronicle.com/article/How-Enrollment-Challenges-Can/242276.

“Data Storytelling With Multiexperiences.” Gartner IT Glossary, Gartner, Inc., http://www.gartner.com/webinar/3900998?pcp=wb_ddc&srcId=1-3478922220.

“The Fourth Industrial Revolution, by Klaus Schwab.” World Economic Forumhttp://www.weforum.org/about/the-fourth-industrial-revolution-by-klaus-schwab.

Kolb, David A. Experiential Learning: Experience as the Source of Learning and Development. Pearson Education, Inc., 2015.

Mikropoulos, Tassos A., and Antonis Natsis. “Educational Virtual Environments: A Ten-Year Review of Empirical Research (1999–2009).” Computers & Education, vol. 56, no. 3, 2011, pp. 769–780., doi:10.1016/j.compedu.2010.10.020.

Shukla, Umang, et al. “An Introduction to 360° Video.” Knight Lab Studio, studio.knightlab.com/results/storytelling-layers-on-360-video/an-introduction-to-360-video/.

Taylor, Stephen. “The Fork In The Road.” PoemHunter.com, 15 Feb. 2009, http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/the-fork-in-the-road-2/.

“What Is 360-Degree Photograph? – Definition from WhatIs.com.” WhatIs.com, whatis.techtarget.com/definition/360-degree-photograph.

Dr. Cowin’s NAFSA 2020 eConnection Virtual Poster “Augmented Reality: The Merge Cube and Google Expeditions”

by Jasmin Bey Cowin, Ed.D.

Assistant Professor and Practicum Coordinator, Touro College, Graduate School of Education

The NAFSA 2020 eConnection Virtual Poster Fair was a fantastic experience! It was an honor to participate.

Dr. Cowin’s Merge Cube and Google Expedition Poster for the Virtual Poster Fair at the 2020 NAFSA Conference

When I submitted my poster to the 2020 NAFSA Conference I had no idea how much our country, the world, and education were going to change through COVID-19. Thank you to NAFSA eConnection for creating a virtual poster fair! I’m excited to see that many of the resources, ideas, and recommendations for virtual collaboration and connections are now recognized as fundamental for the future.

The Merge Cube lets you hold virtual 3D objects, enabling an entirely new way to learn and interact with the digital world. Google Expeditions lets a teacher take student explorers through collections of 360° and 3D images. Merge cube features a free Miniverse App incorporating Google expeditions such as the animals of the Galapagos or the Grand Canyons. The Merge Explorer features interactive experiences for elementary through middle school, where students can investigate a smoking volcano, examine a great white shark, and hold the earth in the palm of their hands. Using innovative virtual and augmented reality (VR/AR) technology, and aligned with Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), students can learn about topics such as earth science, life cycles and traits, ocean animals, space systems, structure and properties of matter, energy, waves, light, sound and more.

In this poster, you will find a QR code with a printable merge cube which has limited functionality for you to try it out. Download and launch a free Cube app on your smartphone or tablet. – I included 3 free Merge apps with their QR codes on the poster. Point your device at the Cube. Watch the Cube transform into a virtual object!

SmartSelect_20180605-211043_Explorer

Multisensory Learning
The Merge Cube enables a multisensory learning experience since students can engage with digital content naturally and intuitively using visual, auditory, kinesthetic, and tactile senses, for more memorable and impactful learning.
Developing Spatial Abilities
With the Merge Cube, students practice and develop spatial intelligence through manipulating and inspecting digital 3D objects. Students with strong spatial abilities excel in STEM fields, allowing them to go further.

Google Expedition
Google Expedition can be accessed either in an immersive VR view or a 360 mobile view, by clicking on the non-VR view icon in the bottom right-hand corner of the screen. This non-VR view means that students do not have to use any additional technology, their mobile device is enough. Students are probably familiar with using their device in this manner, due to Facebook 360. There are more than 900 virtual field trips available in the Google spreadsheet included through a QR code for you. You can take your students anywhere in the world from the Grand Canyons to the Louvre.

 

Aria in Classic Style Marcel Grandjany Jasmin Bey Cowin Harp, Christian Markus Raiser Organ

Live recording at the Evangelische Stadtkirche Karlsruhe of the Aria in Classic Style by Marcel Grandjany (1891-1975), a meditative piece for harp and organ. Grandjany was primarily a harpist, but also played some organ, which is why both instruments blend so beautifully. This is a live recording and not a studio recording.

 

Process Chart for Computers for Schools Burundi

This poster presents an analysis of the SOFAIR method, a Six Sigma Approach to continual improvement for social responsibility that was used to analyze the collaborative project Computers for Schools Burundi. This project, together with several stakeholders both in Burundi and globally, supports thousands of students from disadvantaged regions throughout Burundi.

Computers for Schools Burundi-3-01

Accepted Conference Proposal: Simulation-Based Learning Environments for the Twenty-seventh International Conference on Learning July 13 – 15, 2020

Accepted Conference Proposal: Simulation-Based Learning Environments for the Twenty-seventh International Conference on Learning July 13 – 15, 2020. A virtual poster presentation with a focus on epistic game theory.

A virtual poster presentation with a focus on epistic game theory

letter_of_invitation_jasmin-cowin

Online, web-based virtual classroom environments, populated with student avatars, use simulation-based learning to increase teacher candidates’ understanding of the educational needs of diverse learners. The student avatars in simulations are controlled by artificial emotional intelligence software. As intensive web applications, these environments can provide a safe, risk-free virtual space to explore a range of teaching strategies, while offering immediate feedback as a training tool for teacher candidates during interrupted practicum experiences, fully online pedagogy courses and virtual fieldwork experiences.

Keywords: Simulation-Based Learning, Virtual Reality, Artificial Intelligence, Epistic Game Theory, Virtual Teacher Practicum

For whom: Twenty-Seventh International Conference on Learning July 13 – 15, 2020 Universitat de València – Facultat de Magisteri, Av. dels Tarongers, 4, València, Spain

 

“The Flowers of Edinburgh” Theresa Thompson, Flute & Jasmin Bey Cowin, Harp

“The Flowers of Edinburgh” appears in Oswald’s Caledonian Pocket Companion, 1742, but cannot be traced in any earlier musical collection. It became a fashionable hornpipe about 1740, and was called “The Flowers of Edinburgh,” in compliment, it is supposed, to the young ladies of the Scottish capital who were then attending the dancing schools. About the same time the following words were written to the tune.
⁠He was the flower of a’ his kin,
The absence of his bonnie face
⁠Has rent my tender heart in twain.
I day or night find no delight;
⁠In silent tears I still complain;
And exclaim ‘gainst those my rival foes,
⁠That ha’e ta’en from me my darling swain.

Despair and anguish fill my breast,
⁠Since I have lost my blooming rose;
I sigh and moan while others rest;
⁠His absence yields me no repose.
To seek my love I’ll range and rove,
⁠Through every grove and distant plain;
Thus I’ll ne’er cease, but spend my days,
⁠To hear tidings from my darling swain.

There’s naething strange in nature’s change,
⁠Since parents show such cruelty;
They caused my love from me to range,
⁠And know not to what destiny.
The pretty kids and tender lambs
⁠May cease to sport upon the plain;
But I’ll mourn and lament in deep discontent
⁠For the absence of my darling swain.

Kind Neptune, let me thee entreat,
⁠To send a fair and pleasant gale;
Ye dolphins sweet, upon me wait,
⁠And convey me upon your tail;
Heaven bless my voyage with success,
⁠While crossing of the raging main,
And send me safe o’er to a distant shore,
⁠To meet my lovely darling swain.

All joy and mirth at our return
⁠Shall then abound from Tweed to Tay;
The bells shall ring and sweet birds sing,
⁠To grace and crown our nuptial day.
Thus bless’d wi’ charms in my love’s arms,
⁠My heart once more I will regain;
Then I’ll range no more to a distant shore,
⁠But in love will enjoy my darling swain.

 

 

Touro TESOL Practicum Teacher Candidate Felicia Giaccone’s Website

Growth mindsetTouro TESOL Practicum Teacher Candidate Felicia Giaccone is “looking for a permeant school community that stands together, respects one another, and is fully invested in all of its students. I believe you will find me to be a dedicated individual who strives to instill motivation and confidence in my students. What I believe I will bring to a school community is passion, heart, enthusiasm, and organization. Despite all the challenges teachers face, it will always be my biggest passion. I strive to show colleagues and students my enthusiasm to continue to learn and further our knowledge together. I venture out to develop new innovative ways to teach the New York State curriculum. I would feel privileged to be a part of your school. I appreciate and thank you for your consideration.”

https://giacconefelicia.wixsite.com/website-2

Touro TESOL Candidate Yevette Jensen’s Morphological Intervention Case Study

EDDN 636 – Linguistic Structure of the English Language- Sociolinguistic Perspective provides an understanding of basic linguistic concepts and their applications for TESOL instruction. Specific concepts include phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, pragmatics, discourse analysis, and the nature of regional and social variations in American English. Students will explore the origins, diversity, and functions of human languages, in addition to the relationship between language and society. Includes 10 hours of fieldwork.

Yevette Jensen is a first-year teacher in the Central Islip School District. She teaches a 15:1 special education class, “with 12 wonderful students! I am currently getting my master’s in TESOL at Touro and this is a case study I did on one of my students to address her lack of morphological awareness.”

Case Study:

The student that I conducted this case study on is Elizabeth. She is a fifth grade ENL student in a 15:1 special education classroom. One of Elizabeth’s classifications is a Speech and Language Impairment so I felt she would be the perfect student to focus on for the case study. Elizabeth’s biggest struggle out of all the academic areas is reading and writing. According to Courter, “As with receptive and expressive language development, the same components of language- phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics- play a vital role in reading and writing” (p. 7). Throughout observing Elizabeth, it is clear that she lacks morphological awareness. Which is why I feel that she lacks skills in reading and writing.

George Yule (2020) defines morphology as “the study of word forms” (p. 67). More specifically, morphology is the study of morphemes; the smallest unit of meaning in language. Morphological awareness is an important aspect to being successful in reading and writing for all students. However, it is especially important for English Language Learners because it breaks down language and creates patterns of meaning for speakers.

The platform that I was working with to conduct this study was Zoom. While I think Zoom is a great way to connect with students, I did run into some difficulties. The biggest challenge was scheduling a time when the student was able to meet with me. A few times we had scheduled to meet and she was unable to due to complications with the internet and or someone else in her family needed to use the computer for their own work. Another issue was her distractibility. This student is high energy and finds it difficult to stay focused in a classroom setting. Having to do this through a Zoom meeting rather than being one on one and being able to use the strategies I have all year to redirect her was a little frustrating. This new “classroom setting” heightened her distractibility and she had to be redirected several times throughout our sessions just by verbal commands rather than the ticket system she was used to from the classroom. With that being said she did put forth great effort to try and focus on what was being taught to her.

Activity storyThroughout the school year, I have taught prefixes and suffixes to my students. This is something that Elizabeth has struggled with all year and it continues to be a challenge for her. Not only is she an ENL student, but she also has a learning disability as well as a Speech and Language Impairment. All of these factors together make it more difficult for her to grasp new concepts such as this one. When reading Elizabeth will skip over words that contain prefixes because she does not understand what the word means. She will also omit a prefix or suffix herself and just say the words that are familiar to her. For example, instead of saying “Sarah was unable to tie her shoes” she would take off the prefix “un” and the suffix “s” and just say “Sarah was able to tie her shoe”. This poses as a problem for her because by doing that she is changing the meaning of the words in the sentence entirely. This is one reason why she struggles with reading comprehension because when she skips over or omits prefixes and suffixes, she is changing the meaning of the word from what it was intended to be. Elizabeth does not have the skills to break down words into different parts in order to gain meaning. My goal in doing this specific activity and others that will follow is to improve Elizabeth’s morphological awareness in hopes that her reading comprehension and overall reading skills improve.

The specific activity I am going to talk about is just the beginning of what I am going to be doing with Elizabeth over the next few weeks. This specific activity focused just on prefixes. I picked 3 prefixes that I felt wouldn’t be too challenging for Elizabeth. The prefixes I chose were: non, dis, and un, all three of these prefixes share the same meaning of “not”. I felt it would be better to teach prefixes that have the same meaning in groups to try any eliminate confusion.

I decided to start the lesson/activity with a short YouTube video called Learn about Prefixes. I wanted to play this in order to build a little background knowledge and to refresh her memory of what we did previously in class. After that, I showed her a brief PowerPoint that I created through the screen share feature on zoom. This PowerPoint went over what a prefix is and what a root word is. As well as explaining how a prefix can change the meaning of a word that we already know. After I went over the PowerPoint, I displayed on the screen a short story. This short story contained one example of each prefix we were focused on for this activity (un, dis, non). As I read the story out loud Elizabeth was following along. When we came across a word with a prefix, she highlighted it with the annotation feature on zoom. I read the article twice, this is something I do all the time with my students due to their lack of comprehension skills. After I read the story twice, I asked Elizabeth to recall what words she saw that contained prefixes. For each word, I had a picture card to show her. I showed her the picture card and asked her what she thinks each word means. After we did this, I pulled up a chart on Zoom under share screen. This chart had 3 columns. One for the prefixes, one for the root word, and one for the meaning of the word. Elizabeth had to break down each word, she did this by writing it down on the chart, I was able to send it to her mom and she printed it out for Elizabeth. I also had her talk me through her thought process. For example, she said things such as “The base word is fair, which means……” or “The prefix in this word is un which means not”.

Activity Chart

After we finished that activity, to close the lesson I had Elizabeth try to come up with words that used the prefixes un, dis, and non on her own. In addition, I assigned her a short homework assignment on Google Classroom. For the homework assignment she had to look up 5 words that I gave her which used the prefixes un, dis, or non and fill out a chart like the one she did for the activity. She then had to use each word in a sentence.

While doing this activity with Elizabeth, she seemed to pick up the concept quickly. She enjoyed the article and the activity that was paired with it. Elizabeth did run into some challenges when she was asked to come up with words on her own using the prefixes. She needed some prompting such has “when someone is not happy, what word can we use to say that?” or “What is the word we use when we do not agree with someone?”. My concern is that she has a hard time retaining information and if not practiced weekly she will never fully understand this topic. I have zoomed with her four times and each meeting was centered around this topic. I definitely have seen some improvement since day one and I feel it is due to the repetition of the concept and review of what we did in the previous meeting each time to refresh her memory. I do plan to continue doing various lesson involving morphological awareness to help Elizabeth improve her skills. A modification I would like to do is have this lesson/activity be more interactive and hands-on. For example, making a sorting game with prefixes and root words or doing a smartboard activity. With our current online teaching situation, there was not much room to implement the typical strategies I use in the classroom to engage her. With all of that beginning said I think Elizabeth did pretty well and did make some progress. I look forward to continuing this with her and hopefully seeing more growth in her morphological awareness.

I think doing this project was a great learning experience. I think a part that was a little challenging for me was having to pinpoint what specific aspect of linguistics I felt Elizabeth struggled with. I was able to do this through the help of my school’s ENL and Speech teacher as well as, reading the many resources that were provided to me. Another part that was a process for me was coming up with the actual activity. As I mentioned above when describing the student, I did this study on, she is not only an ENL student but is also learning disabled and has a Speech and Language Impairment. While creating the activity I had to target the ENL aspect in addition to making sure that the activity was appropriate for where she is academically which is a first-grade level. Something I learned in doing this project is that we as educators have to recognize the needs of our students. Not all of the same strategies or approaches will work for every student. For ENL students specifically it also depends on their proficiency level and not teaching them material on a level that we want them to be at or expect them to be at, but teaching them material on the level they are at and building up from there. In doing that is how we will ensure that our ENL students are being as successful as they can be in the classroom on a daily basis.

References

Common Content Area Roots and Affixes – ReadWriteThink. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/printouts/common-content-area-roots-30842.html

Courter, M. K. (n.d.). 101 Therapy Strategies to Increase Your Effectiveness as a Speech-   Language Pathologist. Bellevue, WA: Bureau of Education & Research.

Rooting Out Meaning: Morpheme Match-Ups in the Primary Grades – ReadWriteThink. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/rooting-meaning-morpheme-match-880.html

VocabularySpellingCity. (2012, September 14). Learn about Prefixes. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l170VTskxKA

Yule, G. (2020). The study of language (4th ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.