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Language Acquisition in Virtual Worlds Versus Traditional Classroom Environments: A Comparative Overview Between the United States and Russia by Jasmin B. Cowin and Dana S. Saulembekova

The book is out! And our chapter is published!

Multimodality, Digitalization and Cognitivity in Communication and Pedagogy
Editors:
Natalya V. Sukhova, Tatiana Dubrovskaya, Yulia A. Lobina
Presents new frameworks for studying multimodality and gives practical hints for educators
Suggests innovative approaches to pressing issues of psycholinguistics and language education
Combines multidisciplinary research

Part of the Numanities – Arts and Humanities in Progress book series (NAHP, volume 20)

Language Acquisition in Virtual Worlds Versus Traditional Classroom Environments: A Comparative Overview Between the United States and Russia by Jasmin B. Cowin and Dana S. Saulembekova

Abstract

The development of virtual worlds (VWs) in the field of language education evolved from purely text-based environments to two- and eventually three-dimensional spaces. VWs date back to the adventure games and simulations of the 1970s. Unlike traditional classroom settings, which are anchored in brick-and-mortar buildings, VWs give language learners the opportunity to practice languages in simulated, visually rich settings. Collaborative and communicative learning opportunities in VWs, together with the ubiquitous growth of online learning platforms and online degrees, raise questions on the long-term outlook for language teaching and learning in the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Although both the Russian Federation and the United States have a multitude of programmes, education degrees and certifications with specific competency requirements for future language teachers and higher education faculty, are there common long-term concerns about domains and respective definitions in technology, multicultural education and language acquisition? To shed light on these questions, the authors analysed US and Russian national missions and second language teaching standards for communication study teacher preparation programmes.

Keywords

Virtual worlds Digital environments Traditional classroom environments Second language acquisition Russia US 

Cite this chapter as:

Cowin J.B., Saulembekova D.S. (2021) Language Acquisition in Virtual Worlds Versus Traditional Classroom Environments: A Comparative Overview Between the United States and Russia. In: Sukhova N.V., Dubrovskaya T., Lobina Y.A. (eds) Multimodality, Digitalization and Cognitivity in Communication and Pedagogy. Numanities – Arts and Humanities in Progress, vol 20. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-84071-6_6

https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-3-030-84071-6#about

Introduction

This book positions itself at the intersection of the key areas of the modern humanities. Different authors from a variety of countries take innovative approaches to investigating multimodal communication, adapting pedagogical design to digital environments and enhancing cognitive skills through transformations in teaching and learning practices. The eclectic forms under study require eclectic approaches and methodologies, and the authors cross disciplinary boundaries drawing on philosophy, linguistics, semiotics, computational linguistics, mathematics, cognitive studies and neuroaesthetics. 
Part I presents methods of analysing multimodal communication in its different displays, covering promotional video in crowdfunding project presentations, multimodal public signs of prohibition and visuals as arguments. Part II explores varied teaching methodologies that have emerged as a result of and in response to modern technological changes and contains some practical hints for educators. It demonstrates the pedagogical potential of video games, virtual worlds, linguistic corpora and online dictionaries. Part III focuses on psychological and cognitive factors influencing success in the classroom, primarily, ways of developing students’ and teachers’ personalities. 
The volume sits at the intersection between Communication Studies, Digital Humanities, Discourse Analysis, Education Theory and Cognitive Studies and is useful to scholars and students of communication, languages, education and other areas of the humanities. This book should trigger scholarly discussions as well as stimulating practitioners’ interest in these fields.

Keywords

Methodology in Humanities Semiotic pragmatics Discourse Analysis Studies in Multimodality Cognitive Development Education in Digital Environments Pedagogical Design Foreign Language Teaching Online Lexicography Corpus Technologies

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Dr. Abdullah M. Al Ghurbani and Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin presented: Fulbright Alumni, Global Friendships & Action: Teacher Training in Yemen October 21st, 2021

Dr. Al Ghurbani, Sana’a, Yemen and I were honored to present at the conference “Fulbright at 75: Celebrating a Legacy of Global Friendships.”

“For 75 years, the Fulbright Program has engaged passionate and accomplished students, scholars, artists, teachers, and professionals of all backgrounds. We believe that by living and learning together with people from different countries and cultures we can shape a more positive vision for our communities and our world. A hallmark of the Fulbright Program has been its longstanding commitment to Diversity and Inclusion (D&I). We strive to ensure that Fulbright reflects and values the diversity of U.S. society and societies. Equally important to diversity is inclusion. Fulbright takes steps to ensure that the Program’s diverse participants have successful and rewarding exchange experiences.” US Fulbright Program – Diversity & Inclusion (fulbrightonline.org)

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CROSSING THE RUBICON: EDUCATION TRENDS IN A HYPERCONNECTED WORLD by Jasmin Cowin, and Dana Saulembekova

The way that we educate and are educated is changing at a rapid pace. New technologies and ways of interpreting the world are reshaping educational philosophies and altering the pedagogies that underlie them while transforming the modes of delivery that are part of the operations of educational institutions worldwide. This paper discusses the need to rethink education on the cusp of the age of artificial intelligence (AI) and at the dawn of the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

It is a great pleasure to see the conference papers of the XXVI Conference of National Association of Teachers of English in Russia published. Everyone who has ever been involved in a conference team knows how much work and dedication it takes to publish such a substantial, pertinent, and inclusive conference book.

Thank you to Lilia Bondareva, Head of Department, Department of Modern Languages and Communication – National University of Science and Technology “MISIS”, Natalya Sukhova, the editors and my wonderful co-author Dana!

CROSSING THE RUBICON: EDUCATION TRENDS IN A HYPERCONNECTED WORLD

Abstract:

The way that we educate and are educated is changing at a rapid pace. New technologies and ways of interpreting the world are reshaping educational philosophies and altering the pedagogies that underlie them while transforming the modes of delivery that are part of the operations of
educational institutions worldwide. This paper discusses the need to
rethink education on the cusp of the age of artificial intelligence (AI) and
at the dawn of the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

The need for educational institutions, corporations, teachers, and
learners to adapt is great. However, what frameworks are necessary for
education in the digital age? What trends and possibilities are on the
horizon to educate and train the coming generations of educators that
would allow them to remain relevant in the 21st century and beyond? This
article explores global trends in a hyperconnected world such as artificial
intelligence (AI), the Internet of Things (IoT), robotics, automation and
nanomaterials and presents an analysis of ongoing educational
transformations in Russia, China, and the United States. Finally, the article
discusses five emerging trends in 21st-century education, including App
Innovation and Gamification; Digital Literacy; Virtual, Augmented
Reality, and Mixed and Extended Reality; Self-Directed Professional
Development (SDPD), and Collaborative Learning.
Keywords: artificial intelligence (AI), the Internet of Things (IoT),
robotics, automation, educational transformation, frameworks, and
emerging trends for a 21st-century education, hyperconnected world.

Cowin, J.; Saulembekova, D. S. (2021). CROSSING THE RUBICON: EDUCATION TRENDS IN A HYPERCONNECTED WORLD. XXVI Conference of National Association of Teachers of English in Russia. ‘Digital change in the ELT community.’ (pp. 66–78). Moscow, Russia.

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Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin to give workshop on “Reflective Teaching Practices: Fieldnotes, Practicum Journals, and Data Literacy” for the   Amity Institute of Education, India

I am so pleased that I was asked to present a workhop for the Amity Institute of Education, Amity University, Sec-125, Noida,201313  www.amity.edu – Ranked as India’s # 1 Not-For-Profit Pvt. University. All Amity locations are connected to Amity University Campus, Noida over MPLS VPN Network, enabling us to transmit Live Class Rooms to all locations through eLearning Solution and IP Cameras

Lecture for 25th October 2021, at 9:00a.m.(EDT)”Reflective Teaching Practices: Fieldnotes, Practicum Journals, and Data Literacy.”

This interactive lecture is geared towards preservice teachers and will focus on both the mechanics and writing of field notes with a special focus on differences between description versus reflection. Furthermore, the lecture will then touch upon practicum journals and their use as a final teacher candidate’s field experience with reflection questions guiding their observations. The lecture will close with thoughts on using the data collected in both field and practicum experiences by teacher candidates to inform and drive their pedagogy.  

         

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Hispanic Heritage Month 2021: Infographic on Samples of Officially Recognized Indigenous Languages across Latin America designed by Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin

Did You know there are over 1000 indigenous languages spoken across the Americas?

To celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month at Touro College, GSE and the TESOL/Bilingual department, I wanted to create a sharable resource for educators. In my home country, Germany, my local dialect is Swabian, an often incomprehensible, almost separate local language with customs and stories connected to our region.

Then, I thought about the plethora of officially recognized indigenous languages across Latin America. “Language is the foundation of a culture. For Indigenous oral societies, words hold knowledge amassed for millennia. A language also holds the stories, songs, dances, protocols, family histories and connections.”[1] For teachers, this infographic offers the opportunity to discuss the connection between language and culture, highlighting the treasures of the collectives narratives, stories, songs, dances, customs, family histories and connections.

There is a grave danger that indigenous languages disappear due to continued fallout of colonialism, climate change and devastating land loss of indigenous peoples. “Between 1950 and 2010, 230 languages went extinct, according to the UNESCO Atlas of the World’s Languages in Danger. Today, a third of the world’s languages have fewer than 1,000 speakers left. Every two weeks, a language dies with its last speaker, 50 to 90 per cent of them are predicted to disappear by the next century.” [2]

References:

[1] Working Effectively with Indigenous Peoples®

[2] Nina Strochlic, The Race to Save the World’s Disappearing Languages, National Geographic April 2018

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Dr. Jasmin Cowin invited to speak to Rotaract UN on “Have you ever encountered cultural misunderstandings in your workplace communication?”

It is my pleasure to announce that I was invited to speak for Rotaract UN. The topic:


Have you ever encountered cultural misunderstandings in your workplace communication?

This session explores becoming more aware and fostering a deeper understanding of cross-cultural communication. The session will include a foray and discussion into the Hofstede Model and give the attendees the opportunity to connect and collaborate with others through conversation and completing exercises on Power Distance, Uncertainty Avoidance, Individualism versus Collectivism, and Masculinity versus Femininity. Register here:  [LINK: https://bit.ly/3uhBZbw]
Jasmin (Bey) Cowin, Ed.D.
Assistant Professor and TESOL Practicum Coordinator, Touro College, GSE
Current: Rotarian, Rotary Club of Dr. Phillips, Florida
Past Chair, Rotary Club of New York, United Nations International Breakfast Meetings, 2018-2021
Former Assistant Governor, District 7230, Area 5, 2018-2019
Past President, Rotary Club of New York, 2017-2018

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Looking Forward: Join Global Fieldtrips during the NYS TESOL 51st Conference Virtual Day Nov. 4th, 2021

The conference team for the NYS TESOL 51st conference is pleased to announce:

Global TESOL Field Trip on Virtual Day, Nov. 4th, 2021
Virtually visit English Language Learners and their teachers in their classrooms around the World!
Looking Forward: Educational Empowerment & Transformative Education

Register here: https://nystesol.org/register_now.php

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Accepted Presentation for the Fifteenth International Conference on e-Learning & Innovative Pedagogies on April 15 – 16, 2022 at the National Changhua University of Education, Changhua City, Taiwan

I pleased to announce that my poster presentation was accepted for the Fifteenth International Conference on e-Learning & Innovative Pedagogies on April 15 – 16, 2022 at the National Changhua University of Education, Changhua City, Taiwan

Cowin, J. (2022, April). The E-learning and Course Design Wheel: Multimodal and Multiliteracy Perspectives. [Poster]. to be presented at the Fifteenth International Conference on e-Learning & Innovative Pedagogies, 2022 National Changhua University of Education, Changhua City, Taiwan.

Abstract: The possibilities that are opened up by digital platforms, eLearning, and distance education are of great benefit to institutions, corporations, educators, and learners. However, design information for course design is mostly oriented on listings steps or defining the terms of instructional design, eLearning, and blended learning. This poster visualizes eLearning and course design through an eLearning and course navigation wheel keeping in mind multimodal and multiliteracy perspectives. The eLearning and course design wheel can function as appealing support for individuals designing online learning environments or as an eLearning course design guidance.

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Accepted Proposal by Jasmin Cowin and Amany Alkhayat: Envisioning The Future of Language Learning: Virtual Reality, Mobile Learning and Computer-Assisted Language Learning for the 16. International Conference on Language Futures: Languages in Higher Education. 

Cowin, J., Alkhayat, A., (2022, July 29-30). Envisioning The Future of Language Learning: Virtual Reality, Mobile Learning and Computer-Assisted Language Learning [Paper Presentation]. 16. International Conference on Language Futures: Languages in Higher Education. 

Abstract
This paper will concentrate on a comparative analysis of both the advantages and limitations of using digital learning resources (DLRs). DLRs covered will be Virtual Reality (VR), Mobile Learning (M-learning) and Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) together with their subset, Mobile Assisted Language Learning (MALL) in language education. In addition, best practices for language teaching and the application of established language teaching methodologies such as Communicative Language Teaching (CLT), the audio-lingual method, or community language learning will be explored. Education has changed dramatically since the eruption of the pandemic. Traditional face-to-face education was disrupted on a global scale. The rise of distance learning brought new digital tools to the forefront, especially web conferencing tools, digital storytelling apps, test authoring tools, and VR platforms. Language educators raced to vet, learn, and implement multiple technology resources suited for language acquisition. Yet, questions remain on how to harness new technologies, digital tools, and their ubiquitous availability while using established methods and methodologies in language learning paired with best teaching practices. In M-learning language, learners employ portable computing devices such as smartphones or tablets. CALL is a language teaching approach using computers and other technologies through presenting, reinforcing, and assessing language materials to be learned or to create environments where teachers and learners can meaningfully interact. In VR, a computer-generated simulation enables learner interaction with a 3D environment via screen, smartphone, or a head mounted display. Research supports that VR for language learning is effective in terms of exploration, communication, engagement, and motivation. Students are able to relate through role play activities, interact with 3D objects and activities such as field trips. VR lends itself to group language exercises in the classroom with target language practice in an immersive, virtual environment. Students, teachers, schools, language institutes, and institutions benefit from specialized support to help them acquire second language proficiency and content knowledge that builds on their cultural and linguistic assets. Through the purposeful application of different language methodologies and teaching approaches, language learners can not only make cultural and linguistic connections in DLRs but also practice grammar drills, play memory games or flourish in authentic settings.

Objectives
A comparative analysis of both the advantages and limitations of using digital learning resources (DLRs) in language learning. DLRs covered will be Virtual Reality (VR), Mobile Learning (M-learning) and Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL).

Methodologies
A mix of qualitative and quantitative research

Contributions
Insights into digital learning resources in language learning with an alignment of best teaching practices and instructional strategies for both language teaching and learning.

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Touro TESOL Candidate Diane Santos Presents: Field Experience Vignettes for EDPN 673, Methods and Materials for Teaching English as a Second Language

Introduction by Prof. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin, Ed.D.

Fieldwork and field experiences are an integral part of teacher education programs as they enable teacher candidates to examine the ways educational theories and methods can be implemented and interact with live classrooms and students. Touro College’s TESOL/Bilingual EDPN 673, Methods and Materials for Teaching English as a Second Language features a substantial fieldwork component.

The objective of the fieldwork experience in EDPN 673 is to connect course content to practical application in classroom teaching. The teacher candidates’ focus is on identification, observation & use of instructional best practices, lesson planning, lesson delivery, differentiation, assessment, and reflection.

After observing several teachers, Touro TESOL candidates need to choose which observations will become their fieldwork vignettes. The vignettes will show that they, as an aspiring TESOL professional, understand central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches, as identified by relevant professional organizations, and can analyze learning experiences that make these aspects of subject matter meaningful for all students.

Diana Santos is an educator, lifelong learner and mother to a four year old boy. She was born and raised on Long Island, NY but like many children of immigrant parents, English is not her first language. Her native language is Portuguese and upon entering elementary school, she learned to speak, read and write in English due to the wonderful teachers she encountered. Mrs. Santos graduated from Dowling College with a BA in Special and General Education. She pursued her bilingual extension at LIU and Molloy College. Currently, she serves as a 4th grade Dual Language Teacher who teaches in English and Spanish. She is proud to share:”I am proud to say that I will be graduating with a Master’s Degree in TESOL in September 2021 with a G.P.A of 4.0.”

Diana Santos’s Fieldwork Experience: Every semester I take different courses and I am required to complete fieldwork in order to become a better teacher and better my educational practices. This has been by far the most rewarding fieldwork experience of my educational career. I have never been a part of a summer program that included ENL students and it was very educational to see an ENL teacher and a general education teacher in a co-teaching environment while implementing various teaching methods, strategies and materials within their instruction. This summer school program focused on reading and writing skills according to the Teachers College Units of Study. The particular classroom that I was able to observe had only fourth grade students. There were a total of 21 students; 4 attended in-person instruction and 17 attended virtual instruction, which was given simultaneously. There were a total of 11 English language learners in the classroom who have proficiency levels ranging from entering to expanding.

Vignette One

The first fieldwork experience that I would like to focus on is during the reading/writing summer school that was offered through my school district. During this specific incident, the students were learning how to write a personal narrative and the teachers were trying to elicit ideas from students in order to get them started on what their personal narratives were going to be about. The summer program included students who attended in person and students who were remote. Due to the majority of the students attending remotely, the teacher taught by using google meet, google classroom, google slides, padlet, smartboard and the students’ chromebooks. The teacher only utilized the SMART board to show the google meet to the class in order to incorporate the virtual learners. The teacher did not use any paper handouts, tests or textbooks.

There were a few potential distractions throughout the observation. One distraction is the fact that the teacher and ENL teacher are teaching both in person and online. This can be distracting for both sets of students because the teachers are never really focused on just one group of students. Furthermore, the students who are attending virtually have many interruptions to their virtual learning time. A specific example of this is that during the lesson one student could be seen holding a baby while several other children ran around in the background of the camera. This is just one example of many distractions that occurred virtually. These types of virtual distractions can cause other students to lose focus which results in the student not understanding the task or skill that is being taught. One question that arose was why none of the teachers addressed the different virtual distractions. I believe that they should have either gone over the expectations to virtual learning prior to beginning the lesson or at least referred to them while the many distractions were occurring. “It is important for the teacher to create behavioral expectations in virtual classrooms and review the expectations at the beginning of each class, just like they would in person” (Team, 2021, p.1). Due to the current climate that we are in, virtual distractions are inevitable but they can be managed by implementing several strategies.

Throughout the year the students in fourth grade are asked to complete a variety of writing pieces as well as practice many reading skills. One of the writing pieces that the students are asked to create is a personal narrative. This is typically the first unit of the year and therefore the students who were completing the task of coming up with a story idea and writing a personal narrative have background knowledge to refer to. The content objective for the lesson was that students will be able to generate story ideas based on their experiences. The language objective was that students will be able to write story ideas using a digital graphic organizer.

The teacher began the lesson by referring to the student’s prior knowledge of the work that was completed the day before. She then asked the students several questions in order to elicit what information they know about small moments and writing personal narratives. She asked questions such as “what is a personal narrative? Why are personal narratives important? What is a moment? What is a small moment? Could any moment of your life be a small moment? Are moments and experiences the same?” The ENL teacher then showed an example of a small moment story written in both English and the students’ native language, Spanish. She wrote her story about what it felt like to move to Spain when she was in college. The students practiced reading the story aloud in a choral read.

Next, the general education teacher explained the task for the day and that the students were going to be using Padlet as a digital graphic organizer. The teacher showed Padlet on the computer and explained that the students were to pick a section of the padlet and add their name. Then they can pick images, write captions or short story ideas under the section. The students seemed to be familiar with Padlet and how to use it. The ENL teacher then asked the students to close their eyes and think about the most important memories they have. While the students had their eyes closed, she solicited possible ideas such as a trip, memory with a favorite person, a life changing event and favorite things to do. Then the ENL teacher told them to open their eyes and start writing. This great strategy allowed the students time to process their thoughts before starting their assignment.

After the whole group instruction, the ENL teacher broke the students into small groups by proficiency levels in order to differentiate her instruction. With the entering/emerging group she spoke in Spanish to help them generate story ideas while also showing a list of potential story ideas. She then gave the students two sentence frames to use while writing their story idea on the Padlet. With the transitioning and expanding students she spoke to them in English and had conversations about what they were thinking about and scaffolded her questioning in order to help them generate ideas. They got sentence starters like my story idea is and one important memory is. Throughout the rest of the writing period, the ENL teacher checked in with her students to monitor their progress. With some of the entering students she would have them say their sentence in Spanish and then she translated it to English. The students would then rewrite the sentence in English on the padlet. This allowed them an opportunity to practice the target language and acquire it as well.

The ENL teacher would record anecdotal notes on a notepad during the lesson. She then went back and read their padlet entries to check for comprehension and language. Throughout the lesson, both teachers were constantly interacting with both sets of students and answered any questions they may have. The ENL teacher would ask the question several ways in English before reverting to Spanish. There were many questions asked throughout the period in order to promote the students’ higher-order thinking skills as well as help them form connections to the content and task. I believe that the questioning of the lesson was used for various purposes such as to help students recall prior learning and prior life experiences, increase student engagement and to get students to think outside the box. Lastly, the ENL teacher gave students sufficient wait time throughout the lesson and when a student was not able to respond she would scaffold her instruction to help the student.

Vignette Two

The next incident that I would like to speak about is during a reading lesson with an entering student. The ENL teacher was working one on one with an entering student who is considered to be a Student with Interrupted/Inconsistent Formal Education (SIFE). The goal of this lesson was to have him practice his fluency, decoding skills and forming predictions while reading an “A” level book titled Hide by Steve Henry.

The lesson began by having the general education teacher ask the students what a prediction was. They had been working on this skill for two days and were able to answer the question. Then she modeled forming a prediction while reading a book. When she finished the book she thought about whether her prediction was correct. As an extension activity she asked the students to record themselves using Flipgrid, reading a book aloud and forming predictions on their own. The ENL teacher had chosen books on Epic Books according to the students’ proficiency level. She also showed two sentence starters for the students to say “I think ______ will happen” and “my prediction is.”

The reason why I chose to speak about this lesson is because of the issues that arose while the students were trying to complete this task. Some students were not able to access Flipgrid or did not know how to use it because they were not familiar with the program and no one went over how to use the program prior to the students using it. This caused the ENL teacher to have to stop all of the students midway through the lesson and teach the students how to access and use Flipgrid. Next, the students were asked to leave the google meet in order to record themselves and then come back when they finished. This was an issue because many students had questions and were unable to get quick responses or feedback because of the computer restraints. Another issue that I noticed was that the students were having a hard time completing the task itself. Personally, I found this to be a daunting task for the entering and emerging students because not only were they trying to decode and comprehend the books but they were being asked to simultaneously form predictions while being recorded.

The ENL teacher did a wonderful job at addressing this issue by quickly differentiating the task to suit the needs of her students. First, she had the students record themselves forming predictions after only looking at the visuals in the books. Then the students were instructed to make a second recording just reading the book in order to practice fluency and decoding. This allowed for students to tackle only one cognitively challenging task at a time.

For the SIFE student, she worked with him one on one for about twenty five minutes on fluency, decoding, comprehension and forming one prediction. Prior to beginning the book, the student made one prediction by looking at the cover of the book. The student made the prediction in Spanish, the teacher wrote it in English and then the student practiced reading the sentence aloud. The sentence was “I think the book is about an elephant who is lost in the ocean.” Next, the ENL teacher did a choral read with the student. According to Reading Rockets (2021), “Choral reading helps build students’ fluency, self-confidence, and motivation” (p.1). When I spoke to the ENL teacher afterwards she stated that she likes to use different reading approaches in order to help lower a students affective filter in the hopes that they build up their confidence and in turn participate more and take more risks. After the choral read, the ENL teacher asked the student to do an echo read of the same text. She would read the sentence and then the student would repeat the same sentence. After the student read the text, she asked the student to summarize what the book was about. The student didn’t understand and she asked the question again in Spanish. In Spanish the student was able to give a detailed explanation of the text. Finally, she asked the student if his initial prediction was correct. The student said no and was able to explain, in Spanish, why he felt it was incorrect.

Due to this being the same summer program, the initial distractions that were mentioned still posed to be an issue. The teachers do not use supportive backgrounds on google meet. The technology used in this lesson was the computer, google meet, google slides, SMART board, and Epic Books. The recordings of the individual students were used as a form of assessment as well as evidence of their growth. The links to their videos are to be included in their digital portfolio. The various questions that were asked throughout the observation were to recall prior learning, summarize the text and for purposes of evaluating the mastery of the given task. There were also many questions to check for understanding of the task and instructions given. The questioning throughout the lesson was not of variable difficulty.

Vignette Three

The third incident that I would like to describe is during an observation of the summer program during a reading lesson. The objective of this lesson was for the students to describe the mood of the story. In order to motivate the students the general education teacher started by showing many different squares in bright colors. She asked the students “what do you notice?” The students pointed out that there were many squares, they were all different colors, and they were bright colors. Then the teacher asked “how do these colors make you feel?” Some of the responses were “happy, fun, loved, excited, positive, bright, ecstatic and ready to start my day.” Next, the teacher showed another slide with the same squares in dark colors. She asked the same questions but the students’ feelings changed. They used words such as “sad, upset, angry, mad, unloved, bored, sleepy, and depressed.”

The general education teacher went on to explain why she showed the students those colored shapes and how it ties into the mood of the story. She explained that the mood of the story is how the reader feels while he or she is reading the story by reading the words or looking at the pictures, just like when they were examining the squares. This explanation was shown on the computer and the SMART board in both English and Spanish. There was also a visual of a girl on a bus showing a side by side comparison of her mood. One side she was happy and smiling and the other side she was resting her head on her hand and frowning. The teacher then asked the students to pay attention to the mood of the story, “or the way the words and the pictures make you feel,” as she read a book aloud. The book was called The Music of the Sea by Susanna Isern. While the book was being read to the class she pointed out several drawings and important words written in the story to show feeling. She also asked several questions such as “why do you think the author chose these colors? What mood was she trying to set? How do you think the little girl feels? How does it make you feel? Did the colors of the pictures change in the beginning and the end of the book? Why do you think the author did that?” To end the lesson, the students were sent to read in their independent books while the teacher and the ENL teacher conferred with different students. I really enjoyed the variety of questions that were used during this lesson.

The ENL teacher differentiated this lesson by pre-recording a read aloud of the Spanish version of this book for the entering and emerging students to listen to. For the transitioning and expanding students she pre-taught them vocabulary prior to the beginning of this lesson. Some of the vocabulary words that she picked from the book were crops, seashore, coastline, village, deserted, and waves. In order to pre-teach the vocabulary, she associated the word to its Spanish translation while also showing a visual representation of the word.

While she conferred with the students, she asked several questions to help them summarize, determine the mood, focus instruction, assess and form connections. In order to confer with the students virtually she explained to them that while she is speaking to one student, the other students have their microphones muted and their cameras off. Then she would take turns speaking to each individual student for about 5-7 minutes. During the conference, she would take anecdotal notes about their conversations in order to refer to at a later time.

In regard to the classroom, it would be difficult to draw a map of the classroom as I was not physically there. All of the students, regardless of whether they were in class or virtual, were asked to login to google meet and to mute their microphones. This was done in order to seem as though all the students were together and it gave them the ability to see one another. I believe that the teachers did the best they could given their unique teaching situation. The teachers were trying to juggle two sets of learners at the same time while facing several learning barriers and language barriers.

Given the situation, the teachers differentiated their instruction and incorporated several different teaching strategies and methods in order to suit the needs of their learners. A method that they largely incorporated into their instruction was communicative language teaching. Within their instruction they encouraged collaborative discourse and tried to “unravel the speaker or writer’s intention” (Larsen-Freeman, 2000, p.1). Furthermore, the ENL teacher noted any errors that she encountered during the lesson and noted them in order to target them during instruction at a later time. While differentiating her instruction the ENL teacher chose culturally diverse and relevant texts that the students could relate to. For example, during the observation where the students were asked to generate story ideas for their personal narratives, the ENL teacher showed the book Dreamers by Yuyi Morales as an example of an actual personal narrative. It shows and describes the journey that the author took from her home country to the United States with her child. The students were able to relate to this because they also moved from one country to another. All of these lessons were created and implemented in order to continue exposing the students to various reading skills and writing pieces.

Having the opportunity to work with and observe these two wonderful teachers was very enlightening. I learned many different strategies and approaches to education that I can now implement in my dual language classroom. For example, I love the fact that the ENL teacher scaffolded her reading instruction by starting with a choral read and then doing an echo read. By the time the student did the echo read he was much more comfortable with the text and he showed improvement in his fluency. I thoroughly enjoyed this fieldwork experience and look forward to taking what I learned and incorporating it into my daily instruction. 

References

Larsen-Freeman, D. (2000). The LINGUIST List. Techniques and Principles in Language Teaching. https://linguistlist.org/issues/13/13-1434.html/

Reading Rockets. (2021). Choral Reading. https://www.readingrockets.org/strategies/choral_reading

​​Team, P. (2021, April 5). Virtual Classroom Distractions: How Teachers Can Help. Planbook Blog. https://blog.planbook.com/virtual-classroom-distractions/

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Touro TESOL Candidate Jason Madrick on Teaching According to the Stages of Literacy Development

Discussion Boards offer the opportunity to not only to reflect on readings but also contribute with peer responses to the learning process of the course cohort. Jason Madrick submitted thoughtful responses and analysis to the readings and webcast. Also, his peer responses were focused and featured APA style references.

Jason Madrick: Born and raised in Queens, NY, I have been an illustrator, musician, and overall creative person for as long as I can remember. A graduate of Syracuse University with BA degrees in Biology and Anthropology with minors in Sociology and Education, I have been teaching as a substitute teacher in public elementary schools in Queens, and then in the UPK program for more than a decade combined. I look forward to embarking on the next stage of my career in education being employed by the NYC DOE this coming fall and using my artistic and musical talents, love of reading, nature, science and more to convey and hopefully instill a love of learning in my future students.

This DB focuses on your reading of Teaching According to the Stages of Literacy Development

Q: How would YOU in YOUR professional teaching practice, track and assess reading levels? Please be specific in using academic vocabulary.

Jason Madrick: Once I take over a kindergarten class this November, I will be making my first attempts at tracking and assessing a student’s reading abilities. Also, I can’t help but think it sounds a bit more grandiose if I were to rephrase that last sentence like this; Once I’ve usurped an aged and wise educator this Autumn I will tally the cognitive literacy talents of these young minds using multiple methods. What I really mean is, I’m really not sure what type of assessments or reading programs this school uses yet. Any assessments that I made of this skill while in the UPK program were made very informally, and I supposed mostly centered around letters and simple word recognition. I know there are different types of leveled reading book systems that are used in different schools, but in Kindergarten, I suppose that students at this age are all still at the relative beginning of their journey towards literacy. They would all fall within Stage O according to Chall’s Stages of Literacy Development. (The Literacy Bug PDF). There is likely to be a fair amount of variety in the level of beginner reading skills among them as well. Some students may be familiar with the entire English alphabet from A to Z, while others may only recognize the ones that are used to spell their own names and some may be advanced enough to be able to read right through a level A/B/C/D etc type of storybook. In thinking about this, I did go to the website of the school where I’ll be working this fall to learn what reading program they might use, and they mention using the mClass Assessment System. (PS 303 Curriculum). I will have to read up on this in the coming months to familiarize myself with it somewhat before my ascent to being a full-time Kindergarten teacher. Cue jokes from my friends referencing the Arnold Schwarzenegger movie. The school website also states that teachers are of course trained how to use this system for assessment purposes. This assessment is stated to occur three times a school year for grades K-5th. I’m also hoping that during the start of this school year while I am a full-time substitute teacher until I am placed in the Kindergarten class, I will meet with the retiring teacher to learn what I can from her before her retirement. Ideally, I will be able to also observe the class while she is teaching it so I can understand her approach and style of teaching somewhat. I may even learn some tips from her about how to assess reading levels using the mClass program the school uses. For these beginning readers, learning to recognize and write the letters of the English alphabet, learning the sounds related to these letters or phonics, increasing their English vocabulary, and of course, both listening and speaking English in class will be where most of our focus on literacy skills will be. Beyond the mClass system, I will perhaps also use some form of running records and also informal observations to keep track of students’ literacy skills as they progress through the year. This may include asking a student to read a simple sentence or series of words to me, or listening to them as they read something in print to a classmate in school. I’d also like to mention that for ELLs in this classroom I would make sure to display multiple visuals aids and graphics to help with their English language acquisitions. I would also want to use their L1 languages as best I can as a resource for both the students and myself as their teacher. If I have to learn a few new languages to say hello and goodbye in this school year I think I will be able to manage to add those words into my lexicon. Words from their L1 languages I could also present in the classroom as a language resource as well as something familiar from their culture for these students. In addition, native English speakers in the class will also be exposed to new words and languages which I think is very positive for early childhood learners in general. Though I won’t have to make any formal assessments about that process, at least that I’m aware of.

Watching the webcast and looking at the Reading Rockets resources was there anything that you will be able to incorporate into your professional practice?

Webcast description: Robert reads well in Spanish but speaks very little English. Marisa has trouble decoding basic stories. And Ms. Johnson, their second grade teacher, must teach them both to read – along with 23 other students. How? She must differentiate classroom instruction.

Differentiated Reading Instruction: Teaching Every Child is a 60-minute webcast that outlines the most effective strategies teachers can use to address the many different needs of each of their students – so that kids capable of learning to read, like Robert and Marisa, won’t fall behind.

Reading Rockets Resources: https://www.readingrockets.org/webcasts/1001

Jason Madrick: I think the practice of differentiating instruction for diverse student needs will be a crucial skill to further develop as I continue in my teaching career. The ability to accurately determine and apply activities, resources, and skill levels for a variety of students in a classroom is a challenging demand made of today’s public school teachers, and in many ways is something I’m not perhaps as familiar with due to my age and own experience and memories from my own early childhood and elementary school instruction. I think back in the 1980s there was much more of a one size fits all approach to instruction within a single classroom. Though I also remember at that time that my school practiced what I think is called tracking or ability grouping. I know that I was in the “top” performing class from 1st through 6th grade, while there was a “middle” and “low” class in each grade as well each year. Learning how to accurately personalize instructional methods and activities for a wide variety of students within one class will take me time and practice to develop. Also to be able to equitably provide this specialization and differentiation to not just struggling or below level performing students, but also providing appropriately challenging tasks and activities for higher-performing students as well. It seems to me that differentiation of instruction for a wide spectrum of skill/abilities in students by a teacher is something that can make instruction more difficult for teachers. Especially compared to perhaps only teaching students that are all very similar in their academic skills such as the case with the practice of tracking. Of course, it would also seem that the former situation is perhaps fairer, or equitable for students as they can perhaps learn better from each other in a diverse group instead of one where all of the students are struggling at the same approximate level.

What did you learn for your own professional practice that was surprising after reading: Teaching According to the Stages of Literacy Development

Jason Madrick: I think the most surprising, or rather, the most interesting information I learned after reading “Teaching According to the Stages of Literacy Development” is the change in the type of cognitive functions that occur as a person develops and transitions towards becoming an expert, literate adult reader. There was a graph that was included that shows this visually also, which I definitely appreciated. The graph or slide was titled “Instructional Focus Changes Across Time” (The Literacy Bug PDF). To see that there is a point at which, the skills we have developed at first to be able to begin to read gradually sort of fade to the background for increasingly competent readers as they now are reading at an expert level. Once they have transitioned past this point, reading now requires more critical thinking, reflection, and other higher cognitive functions that have become paramount to the reading process. It makes sense to me though, as a kindergartner may have learned the skills to read a simple sentence like “See Spot Run.”, but it would take a much more advanced literate reader to ponder and perhaps ask questions about the more advanced and complicated literature that they are reading about. I’m not sure how likely it is that a kindergartner would perhaps in return independently think or ask their teacher “Who is this Spot? What is Spot? What color is Spot? Can I have a Spot? Why is Spot running? Is something chasing Spot? Should I be running too? Why aren’t you running?” All of which I think are great questions, and with some guidance in continuing verbal conversations with a student, may even be examples of higher-order thinking questions I could ask a student about what they just read to gauge their comprehension of the reading material and to elicit more critical thinking from them.

References

PS 303 Curriculum. AEAPS303Q. (n.d.). https://www.aeaps303q.org/curriculum.

Differentiated reading instruction. Reading Rockets. (2020, January 8). https://www.readingrockets.org/webcasts/1001.

The Literacy Bug. (n.d.). Teaching According to the Stages of Literacy.


Jason Madrick’s peer responses in the Discussion Board:
Hi K! Thanks for your post. I wanted to respond to your post because of your critique of the educational system in regards to pushing students along, and the pressure or “need” for “good” data being collected by a teacher for a school/district, etc. If the ability to read well, and becoming a functionally literate person is the foundation for all academic learning to follow, as well as perhaps for becoming a well-informed citizen capable of critical thinking, debate, and intelligent discussions, then why does the system allow, or rather push or force teachers such as yourself to pass students along from grade to grade? I could say that it’s either systemic or institutional negligence. Or that perhaps it’s inherently linked to our educational systems as it is related to the industrial revolution and the needs of businesses. This is an idea I was familiar with from prior readings in my past, perhaps I think from Howard Zinn’s book, “A People’s History of the United States.”, but I also wanted to find a recent article about it and located one titled “The Modern Education System Was Designed to Train Future Factory Workers to be “punctual, docile, and sober”.” (Schrager, A. 2018). Of course, it could be that many of our current problems with our education systems as we know them are still at work because our government, or the corporations that exert so much influence on it, want these problems to continue, or that they don’t even view them as problems to be corrected. “Well, the world needs ditch diggers too.” says Judge Smails in the movie “Caddyshack” from the 1980s when another character is lamenting that he can’t afford to go to college. Which I think is very much a reflection of that type of mentality and approach to education writ large within our popular culture. But as the world continues to change, and the work that people need, or are required to do to support themselves and their families changes with it, our education system needs to change as well. To quote the article by Allison Schrager that I found online; “In a post-industrial world, education may require an equally bold rethink. It might mean more comprehensive adult education, or regular retraining, to keep skills sharp as old jobs disappear and new ones appear that require vastly different responsibilities. Or it may involve integrating technology to create more personalized learning experiences.” I’m definitely curious to see which route we’ll take in the years to come.

References

​​Caddyshack. 1980.

Schrager, A. (n.d.). The Modern Education System Was Designed to Train Future Factory Workers to Be “punctual, docile, and sober”. Quartz. https://qz.com/1314814/universal-education-was-first-promoted-by-industrialists-who-wanted-docile-factory-workers/.

Zinn, H. (2015). A people’s history of the United States: 1492-present. Routledge.


Jason Madrick’s peer responses in the Discussion Board:
Hello X., and thanks for your post. I wanted to comment in regards to your answer to the last question for this discussion board. I agree with you that the stages of reading development are closely connected and that teachers need to be aware of where a student is in that process so that they can accurately give them the support they need to make progress. Also as you mentioned, as a teacher in elementary school, which is where all of my teaching experience has been up to this point as well, that is where students ideally should be establishing a firm understanding of reading and language skills as this is the foundation for everything that will follow. Now, of course, not all children develop at the same rate or even in the same way cognitively or social-emotionally, so what happens to students that for whatever reason(s) don’t make enough progress in developing their literacy skills while in elementary school? Well, as I mentioned in another post earlier this summer, learning of course is not always a straight path from point A to B and so on. Some students will perhaps get the right resources, and be able to get the support and additional instruction they need to catch up to their peers if they are lacking the skills that a grade or curriculum requires for them to successfully learn from. But of course, many students will not get that support, and will not make progress. But will they continue to go on from grade to grade through junior high and high school even without ever reaching a fully developed, or expert level of reading comprehension? I think the answer is most likely yes. Some students will not graduate from high school, others may have enough skills to pass a GED exam, or will perhaps graduate through a “City as School” program where they gain job skills and experience. But will they ever become well-read, incredibly literate adults? It’s possible, but then it will come back to how much they practice reading during their adult life. Reading is a skill that if it’s not practiced regularly, will not improve, and will likely degrade in some respects and will result in lower comprehension, and ability to take on more complex texts. This also brings to mind a meme I had seen over this past summer that said one of the biggest predictors of future academic success was if and how much reading by parents and family members that a child is exposed to during their crucial early childhood years. If this is in fact true, then ultimately, reading and literacy is a skill that starts from birth and must be practiced for the rest of one’s life to be maintained and/or improved. Obviously, our present system of education has many issues and holes through which students slip through because they are behind their peers, have learning disabilities, have any number of home/life issues, or perhaps just weren’t read to enough as children. -Jason

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Dr. Cowin on “Reimagine and Redesign: Augmented Reality Digital Technologies and 21st Century Education” in the World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology International Journal of Educational and Pedagogical Sciences Vol:15, No:02, 2021

Reimagine and Redesign: Augmented Reality Digital Technologies and 21st
Century Education
Author : Jasmin Cowin


Conference Title: ICLTTE001 2021 : International Conference on Language Teaching and Teacher Education
Conference Location : Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
Conference Dates : February 17-18, 2022

Abstract : The future of education is reimagined and redesigned through new technologies and ways of interpreting the world. This reshaping of educational philosophies and their underpinning pedagogies transforms the modes of delivery in educational institutions worldwide. This paper explores new augmented reality digital technologies (ARDTs) and their use cases in reimagining education during the artificial intelligence (AI) age. The future of education and work will be a fluid panorama with no job or career guaranteed in a VUCA (volatility, uncertainty, complexity, ambiguity) environment. Structuring education as a menu of predefined disciplines and degrees in brick-and-mortar educational institutions may no longer be an optimal model. The convergence of three areas: ARDTs, big data and global demand of a highly qualified teacher workforce have far-reaching consequences in the field of education, raising fundamental questions about the nature of education and educators: what is taught, by whom it is taught, how it is taught, and where is it taught. The transformative way knowledge is generated, disseminated, and transformed into products and services comes on top of recent transformations in business processes enabled by data aggregation and networks. Learning centers are being transformed by computer-based intelligent systems. Algorithmic approaches to decision making are starting to permeate both institutional and personal spheres through decision support systems. In education, artificial intelligence (AI) and intelligent systems will become change agents with deep impacts not only on assessment, administrative functions, organizational strategic planning, student acquisition, and retention but also on curriculum design, personal learning networks (PNL), and the global competitiveness of educational institutions and their graduates. Keywords and changing terminology, such as Fourth Industrial Revolution, artificial intelligence (AI), the Internet of Things (IoT), robotics, Augmented Reality Digital Technologies, terminal automation, nanomaterials, educational
transformation, frameworks, and emerging trends for a 21st-century education, globalization, Blockchain, Holochain, deep learning, personalized learning, machine learning, and gamification are indicators of a changing dialogue within the education landscape and among its professionals. Areas in which AI is already entwined in education include smart content, intelligent
tutoring systems, virtual facilitators, ARDTs, and yet-to-be-invented learning environments with the distinct possibility of blockchain or Holochain integration for administrative organizational purposes. Blockchain or Holochain integration has the potential to disrupt through the automatic recognition and transfer of credits, the tracking of intellectual property, the use of verified sovereign identities for student identification, and immutable certificates/micro-credentials. In conclusion, ARDTs have the potential to foster learning through simulations, digital kiosks, live virtual events, live interactivity, instructor-facilitated learning, AI-driven chatbots, and hyper-realistic experiences. However, there are yet-to-be-analyzed dangers around pervasive information capture, which is more than tracking a user’s browsing history. Ultimately, 21st-century ARDTs and computer assisted learning present significant opportunities and challenges to educational institutions and learners alike.


Keywords : artificial intelligence (AI), Augmented Reality Digital Technologies (ARDT), Blockchain, educational transformation, Holochain, Internet of Things (IoT)

Reimagine and Redesign: Augmented Reality Digital Technologies and 21st Century Education (waset.org)

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Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin accepted to present at Language Teaching and Teacher Education Conference, February 2022 in Jeddah on Reimagine and Redesign: Augmented Reality Digital Technologies and 21st Century Education

The future of education is reimagined and redesigned through new
technologies and ways of interpreting the world. This reshaping of
educational philosophies and their underpinning pedagogies
transforms the modes of delivery in educational institutions
worldwide. This paper explores new augmented reality digital
technologies (ARDTs) and their use cases in reimagining education
during the artificial intelligence (AI) age.

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Prof. Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin invited to speak on “Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: A Multidisciplinary Teaching Frontier” at the 2nd Global Summit and Expo on Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials (GSENN2022)

Prof. Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin invited to speak on “Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: A Multidisciplinary Teaching Frontier” at the 2nd Global Summit and Expo on Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials (GSENN2022)

I am excited to be part of the 2nd Global Summit and Expo on Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials (GSENN2022):

“On behalf of the organizing committee and The Scientistt, we would like to invite Prof. Dr. Cowin as a speaker to our 2nd Global Summit and Expo on Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials (GSENN2022) taking place in Copenhagen, Denmark on June 13-15, 2022.

Prof. Cowin’s topic on “Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: A Multidisciplinary Teaching Frontier” was accepted by the Review Committee Members at 2nd Global Summit and Expo on Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials (GSENN2022) taking place in Copenhagen, Denmark on June 13-15, 2022.”

The GSENN2022 is the vital platform for exchanging recent achievements and discussing future facilities in Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology. The GSENN2022 will be a 3 days event that means to gather the key players of the Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology and related sectors.

The GSENN2022 aims to be a unique platform for leading scientists, researchers, scholars and engineers from academia, R&D laboratories and industry around the world to exchange, share and learn the most
recent advancements on various aspects related to Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology.

https://www.thescientistt.com/nanotechnology-nanomaterials/2022/

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Flash Registration SALE for the NYS TESOL 51st Hybrid Conference: Looking Forward: Educational Empowerment and Transformative Education

Flash Registration SALE for the NYS TESOL 51st Hybrid Conference: Looking Forward: Educational Empowerment and Transformative Education

NYS TESOL

Register TODAY for the NYS TESOL 51st Hybrid Conference! ⚡️⚡️⚡️⚡️Spots are limited!! 🔹Flash Registration SALE being offered until Friday, August 6,2020⚡️⚡️⚡️⚡️⚡️🔹Hybrid Conference with virtual and in-person options🔹Registration Code: FLASH2021 to receive 20% off🔹Registration Link: https://mms.nystesol.org/members/evr/reg_event.php?orgcode=NYST&evid=28075129

It’s a FLASH SALE!!  We are offering 20% off on all registrations for the NYS TESOL 51st Annual Conference!  This is the LOWEST rate we will be offering, so be sure to register by Friday, August 6th in order to secure this reduced rate!!  Just use the code FLASH2021 when registering. 

This year’s conference will be hybrid, with a virtual day on Thursday, November 4th and in-person days on Friday, November 5th and Saturday, November 6th at the Sonesta White Plains in New York (formerly the Crowne Plaza).  The conference theme is Looking Forward: Educational Empowerment and Transformative Education.  We are offering three full days of workshops, plenary speakers, and practical sessions.  This year we will also have virtual, international site visits, an administrator ENL boot camp (focus on ENL regulations and best practices), and speed networking sessions.  Plus, be sure to join us for our dinner and dance party on Friday night!  We currently have a LIMITED NUMBER of seats available so don’t delay!  We encourage all teachers, teacher educators, support staff, and administrators to attend the conference.  You have the opportunity to earn up to 6 CTLE credits per day of attendance.  2022 NYS TESOL membership is included with ALL conference registrations.  Please share this conference information with anyone in your network who may be interested in attending!  If you have any questions, please email vpconference@nystesol.org.   If you are a current NYS TESOL member, be sure to use the email address associated with your account in order to receive a discounted rate.   You can also book your Sonesta Hotel room for a reduced rate using the code here.  

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Touro TESOL candidate Jaclyn Kletchka reflects on English Language Learners with Learning Disabilities

As Touro TESOL Bilingual teacher candidates prepare for a career in education and to become a reflective practitioner, it is imperative that they accept responsibility and take an active role in their own learning. This is why the TESOL Program at Touro College requires to write Reflective Learning Journals.

Ten Attributes of a Reflective Practitioner (Larrivee, 2009)

  1. Reflects on and learns from experience
  2. Engages in ongoing inquiry
  3. Solicits feedback
  4. Remains open to alternative perspectives
  5. Assumes responsibility for own learning
  6. Takes action to align with new knowledge and understanding
  7. Observes self in the process of thinking
  8. Is committed to continuous improvement in practice
  9. Strives to align behaviors with values and beliefs
  10. Seeks to discover what is true

Biography

Jaclyn Kletchka is a graduate student at Touro College’s TESOL program. She has experience working for the Brentwood School District where she filled the roles of permanent substitute teacher, ENL leave replacement teacher, and summer school kindergarten teacher. Ms. Kletchka shared that “during my free time, I enjoy reading, going on hikes, and spending time with my two rescue pups!”

Description of Highlight(s) – chapter, article or event that is relevant to the EDPN 671 course.(10 pts.)    In the video titled, English Language Learners with Learning Disabilities, Dr. Cardenas Hagan, a bilingual speech pathologist discusses with a representative from colorincolorado effective instructional strategies for English language learners who are also students with disabilities. Hagan also explains strategies that encourage active parent involvement of parents of English language learners with learning disabilities. In the profession of TESOL education, this is a very important topic because it can be difficult to distinguish whether a student is struggling due to a learning disability, or due to the language barrier. The presenter of this video explains that when students first come to school, they should be screened and this can be used as an “anchor” for the teacher. The teacher then implements the use of accommodations when working with English language learners to monitor their progress. If the student is not responding to the modifications and accommodations, it is then that the teacher should begin the Response to Intervention (RTI) process (colorincolorado). An effective strategy that Hagan stated is that teachers should assess these students in both the English language, and in their native language. This is a very helpful tool when determining if an English language learner has a learning disability because educators are able to observe the students’ skills in both languages. Hagan discussed that a potential problem with the assessments being used is that they are not always culturally relevant to English language learners. Once a student is classified as an English language learner with a learning disability, it is critical that their Individualized Education Plan (IEP) includes specific goals and objectives that are measurable. Hagan emphasizes throughout the video presentation that these students must be receiving support in their native language as well as in the English language, and that teachers can help ELLs make connections between the two languages.
Initial Emotional Response (surprised, embarrassed, sad, inspired, excited, puzzled, etc.) (10 pts.)   My initial response to watching this video about English language learners who have learning disabilities was excitement. I am certified to teach both general education and special education grades birth through six, and I am soon to be a certified ENL teacher. Since I am certified to teach in these content areas, it is very likely that I will be teaching ELLs with learning disabilities throughout my educational career. I felt excitement when watching this video because there are so many resources and effective instructional strategies that teachers can utilize when reaching these learners. My initial response when watching this video was excitement also because I have worked with English language learners who have learning disabilities, and absolutely loved it. While watching this video, I felt very impressed with the strength of both educators, and students. Educators adapt their teaching and instructional strategies to meet the individual needs of their unique learners, and I find this to be truly amazing. Not only am I impressed with the teachers, but I am also impressed with the students who are both English language learners and students with disabilities. These students are learning both content, and the English language all at the same time. I feel that this is extremely difficult for any individual, and especially for students with disabilities.
Learning Process   1) Prior Assumptions or Opinions about the topic of the described highlight. (10 pts.)   My prior opinion on ENL students who have learning disabilities is that it is very difficult to identify if the academic delay is due to a learning disability, or the language barrier. I assumed that this is especially difficult when the educators do not speak the same language as their students who are English language learners. I feel that the language barrier is not only difficult for the students, but also for the teachers in the classroom. If a teacher does not speak the same language as the English language learners in his/her classroom, they have to find ways to accommodate these students’ language, social, and academic needs. I had the assumption that some of the assessments given to this population of students are not effective in determining if a student is struggling because of a learning disability, or due to the language barrier. The assessments may not be effective due to factors such as cultural and language differences. A student may not know how to accurately answer a question because they have not yet been exposed to the vocabulary terms or academic language. Before watching this video, I also had the prior assumption that English language learners who have learning disabilities require a large amount of accommodations and modifications within their learning. I felt that these students need more one-on-one instruction than their peers and that it will take them a longer time to grasp and master academic concepts, due to their learning disability, and language barrier. Prior to watching this video, I also had the assumption that English language learners should also receive academic instruction and support in their native language as well as in the English language.
2) Source of Assumption or Opinion (10 pts.)  I have the opinion that it can be difficult to confidently determine whether a student is struggling academically due to a language barrier, or because of a learning disability. The source of this assumption are conversations I have had with several ENL teachers. For the past year, I have worked at East Elementary School in Brentwood, New York. The population of students that attend East Elementary is largely composed of bilingual and ENL students. When speaking with experienced ENL teachers, they explained to me how difficult it can be to determine if a student is struggling due to a language barrier, or due to a learning disability. I have learned from ENL teachers in my school that this is an especially difficult task when working with young children, as East Elementary is a kindergarten building. I also feel that English language learners who have a learning disability require more academic support and accommodations than their general education peers. I have these opinions regarding this content area because I just recently completed a leave of absence position where I filled the role of a kindergarten ENL teacher. During this leave replacement position, I worked in small groups, and one-on-one with English language learners who are also students with disabilities to teach them the basic skills of reading and writing. While planning lessons and materials, I followed a literacy curriculum, as well as, my students’ IEP goals. I have experienced first hand that this population of students require more one-on-one attention and instruction than their general education peers. Throughout this leave replacement position, I have also gained experience in developing accommodations and modifications to meet the needs of my students. For example, I observed that a large majority of my students were struggling with identifying the letters and the letter sounds. In an attempt to strengthen this skill, I created an alphabet book for each of my students. The book consisted of the uppercase and lowercase letters, and a picture of an object that represents the sound that letter makes. I practiced the alphabet and alphabet sounds for a few minutes each day with my students. I also created interactive and engaging games to play with my students. One game that I created is called “alphabet soup”. I placed letters in a bowl and the students “scooped” up the letters using a spoon, and I would ask the students educational questions such as “what does this letter say?” and “can you think of a word that begins with that letter?”. I also have the assumption that English language learners should be receiving instruction in their native language based on my experiences as an ENL kindergarten teacher.     
3) Assumption/Opinion Check – Validation/Invalidation (20 pts.)    After viewing the video, English Language Learners with Learning Disabilities, my opinion that English language learners who are also students with disabilities require more accommodations and modifications to their learning has been validated. My assumption that it can be very difficult to determine whether a student is having a difficult time academically because of a language barrier, or due to a learning disability has also been validated. At the beginning of this video, Hagan explains that this is a current issue and that educators often struggle to make the distinction between a learning disability and a language barrier. According to the article titled, English Language Learners & Disproportionality in Special Education, English language learners are at a disadvantage due to the lack of appropriate valid and reliable assessment instruments” (Irujo, 2004). The presenter of the video, Hagan, explains that English language learners should be assessed in both their native language, and in the English language. By assessing the student in both languages, the teacher has the opportunity to gain a better understanding of the students’ academic skills. I have also gained further knowledge on my assumption that it is important for English language learners to continue developing skills in their native language. This opinion was validated when reading chapter six of the textbook titled, Affirming Diversity written by Nieto and Bode. The authors of this textbook state that “in the case of emergent bilingual students, this means that their natie language can be a strong foundation for future learning” (Nieto & Bode, 2018). In this chapter, Nieto and Bode explain how teachers can build upon the skills students have in their native language to further develop their skills when speaking the English language.        
4) Realization/Aha Moment or Epiphany (20 pts.)   Before viewing this video, I understood the difficulty of determining whether a student is struggling due to a lack of English proficiency or due to a learning disability. However, I was not fully aware of the measures that must be taken to ensure a student is placed in the correct educational setting, and is receiving the proper support and services. Before watching this video and conducting further research, I was also not aware of how educators tease out between learning difficulties and language difficulties. The “aha moment” occurred to me when watching this video and the speaker stated that “no matter what the language, and within languages, and across languages what we will find are similar patterns of difficulty” (colorincolorado). Hagan provided the audience with the example of a student with dyslexia. She explains that a student with dyslexia will very clearly display in their native language the same type of difficulties, such as having trouble with the processing of sounds, as in the English language. It was during this moment that I realized if a student has a learning disability, they are likely to show the same or similar struggles when learning in both their native language and the English language. From doing further research on the topic of English language learners with learning disabilities, I have learned that ELLs may be overrepresented in special education, due to ineffective assessments and assessment strategies. According to the article titled, English-language learners may be over-represented in the learning disabilities category, it is critical that a stable assessment tool is developed that is able to accurately identify if a student is struggling due to a lack of proficiency of the English language, or a learning disability (Krings, 2107). This article explains that the national estimates reveal that English-language learners may be over-represented in the learning disabilities category due to ineffective and inaccurate testing. Based on conducted research on this topic, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA) legally requires the distinction between a learning disability and a lack of language proficiency, which can be challenging to identify.  
Implications for future teaching practice (20 pts.) What specific changes do you intend to make in your teaching or classroom environment? After watching this informative video, I plan to make several changes to my teaching methods in order to better support English Language Learners who have learning disabilities. I learned from the video titled English Language Learners with Learning Disabilities, that it is very important to get to know your students and build positive relationships with each and every one of them. In order to do so, I plan on implementing a daily check in into our morning routine. I plan on doing this daily check in by creating a “ feelings thermometer”. On the right side of this “thermometer” will be different feelings such as happy, sad, excited, angry, etc. On the left side of the “thermometer” will be a pipe cleaner with a bead. The students will move the bead each day to tell me how they are feeling that day. I also learned from this video the importance of incorporating the students’ cultures and native languages into my lesson plans. I feel that it is very important to build students’ confidence and make them feel comfortable and safe in your class. A great and effective way to do this is by learning about, and embracing their cultures and what makes them unique. I am going to include my students’ cultures and native languages into my teaching through literature, videos, and student created projects. I plan on having my students complete a project where they bring in an item from their culture. This item could be a type of food, a piece of clothing, or a family heirloom. The students will bring these items into school and will have the opportunity to share their culture with their classmates. Not only will the students be learning important information about other cultures, but they will also have the opportunity to practice their speaking and listening skills. Another change I plan on implementing into my classroom environment is making a greater effort to include parents and families into their child’s learning. Throughout the video, Hagan discussed the importance of getting parents and families involved in their childrens’ learning, especially students who are English language learners with learning disabilities. I plan on taking Hagan’s advice and encouraging parents to read to their children, even if it is in their native language, and not in the English language. The presenter of this video explains how this is a great way to get children excited about learning how to read (colorincolorado). Hagan pointed out that some parents of our students may not know how to read and write, and this makes it very difficult for them to read to/with their children. If I am aware of parents not being able to read and/or write, I am going to provide them with the support and resources they need such as adult literacy courses, translation services, etc. The last change I plan on implementing into my teaching is the increased use of group learning. I feel that it is essential that students learn from each other, and group learning will help English language learners with learning disabilities to improve upon their speaking and literacy skills. I also feel that group learning will benefit this population of students greatly because it gives them the opportunity to socialize with their peers and build their confidence. I believe that all of the changes I plan to incorporate into my classroom are relevant and important to TESOL and bilingual education. The changes I am going to begin to implement are important to this field of education because they are all strategies to improve the overall academic experience for ENL and bilingual students.

References

          Colorincolorado. (2015). English Language Learners with Learning Disabilities. (Video). YouTube. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xMJKHh1cL5I.

            Irujo, S. (2004). English Language Learners & Disproportionality in Special Education. MAEC. Retrieved from https://maec.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/English-Learners-and-Disproportionality-in-Special-Ed.pdf.

Krings, M. (2017). English-language learners may be over-represented in learning disabilities category. Psychorg. Retrieved from https://phys.org/news/2017-02-english-language-learners-over-represented-disabilities-category.html.

Nieto, Sonia & Bode, Patty (2018). Affirming Diversity. The Sociopolitical Context of Multicultural Education. Seventh Edition, Pearson, New York.

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Touro TESOL/Bilingual teacher candidate Elias Y. Taveras reflects on Affirming Diversity

A reflective learning journal is a means of recording ideas, personal thoughts and experiences, as well as reflections and insights candidates experience during during their Touro TESOL/Bilingual journey. Reflective journal writing requires candidates to think more deeply, confront their values and beliefs, and encourages them to pose questions.

What is a Reflective Learning Journal?

A reflective learning journal is a means of recording ideas, personal thoughts and experiences, as well as reflections and insights candidates experience during during their Touro TESOL/Bilingual journey. Reflective journal writing requires candidates to think more deeply, confront their values and beliefs, and encourages them to pose questions.

Assignment:

In your reflective journal, you will be required to critically analyze and synthesize the information you are learning into your personal thoughts and philosophy, integrate what the learning may mean to you as a teacher, and to guide you to identify your future professional development needs.

The reflective learning journal also provides faculty with insights regarding your learning so that they may respond to questions and explore topics that need further clarification. Lastly, the journal provides you take charge of your own learning and to develop the habits of a reflective, lifelong educator (adapted from Assessment Resources, HUK, 2012).

Touro TESOL/Bilingual teacher candidate Elias Y. Taveras submitted a deeply thoughtful reflection. It is a priviledge and honor to read such submissions as they help me grow both professionally and personally.

Mr. Taveras embodies : “Teachers have three loves: love of learning, love of learners, and the love of bringing the first two loves together.” ― Scott Hayden

Mr. Taveras currently serves as a teacher in the Bronx, NY. He migrated from the Dominican Republic when he was in middle school and grew up in the city ever since. Mr. Taveras received a Bachelor of Art in Journalism from SUNY Buffalo State and later completed his master’s in Bilingual Education at The City College of New York. Mr. Taveras wrote that “…above everything else, I am a single father and a teacher of kindness.”

Mr. Taveras’ Reflective Journal on Affirming Diversity

  1. Description of Highlight(s) – chapter, article or event that pertains to ___________course. (20 pts.)
    For this reflection, I have chosen to write about chapter two of Affirming Diversity. The Sociopolitical Context of Multicultural Education by Sonia Nieto. Chapter two is titled Defining Multicultural Education for School Reform. The chapter begins with Sonia Nieto explaining that for many years she has heard through conversation with educators that multicultural education is a “done deal” that is not needed. Such a statement reflects on how misunderstood diversity is in our country. Furthermore, when people begin to have conversations about diversity it is usually about sensitivity training, units about ethnic holidays, food festivals. When schools take this approach to multicultural education the potential for lasting change is decimated. The chapter breaks down the definition of multicultural education as an essential tool for school reform by analyzing seven primary characteristics. The definition highlights the lack of achievement on students of diverse backgrounds and promotes the content and process of education. It is also mentioned that multicultural education will not serve as the solution for the achievement gap, put an end to boring curriculums, or stop vandalism in the communities. Nonetheless, multicultural education can provide change and reform to the educational system. The chapter breaks the definition of multicultural education into seven characteristics meant to detain us from developing one way of understanding multicultural education. Instead, they are meant to entice us into thinking about the interplay between societal and school structure and context and how those factors affect learning. Sonia Nieto defines multicultural education on a social-political basis: “Multicultural education is a process of comprehensive school reform and basic education for all students. It challenges and rejects racism and other forms of discrimination in society and accepts and affirms the pluralism (ethnic, racial, linguistic, religious, economic, gender, and sexual orientation, amongst others) that students, their communities, and teachers reflect. Multicultural education permeates the school’s curriculum and intuitional strategies as well as the interactions amongst teachers, students, and families and the very way that schools conceptualized the nature of teaching and learning,” (p. 32). The chapter continues to die peeper into multicultural education.
  2. Initial Emotional Response (surprised, embarrassed, sad, inspired, excited, puzzled, etc.) (5 pts.)
    Reading about the highlighted brought a mix of emotions and it forced me to reflect on my past experiences as an educator and professional. Specially because some of the examples in the chapter had to do with topics and lessons that I had already thought about in the past. Moreover, if I could select an emotion that overwhelmed all the others after reading about the topic it would have to be an embarrassment. I felt embarrassed at different levels because there were numerous aspects of multicultural education that I had no idea about and there were many realizations about my behavior and that of my colleagues that were indeed embarrassing. Reading the chapter I first felt embarrassed when Sonia Nieto mentions: “unfortunately when multicultural education is mentioned, many people think of lessons in human relations and sensitivity training, units about ethnic holidays, education in inner-city schools, or food festivals. If multicultural education is limited to these issues, the potential of substantive change in school is severally diminished,” (p. 32). This let me feeling embarrassed because at my school and specifically in my classroom we have celebrated many events about a different culture. For black history month, we would briefly go over historical figures and their impact on history. For Ramadan, we would read a book about Islam and have the kids discuss it. However, the worst of the worst was when Cinco de Mayo would roll around, and all across the school, we would be celebrating Mexican culture with a holiday that real Mexicans do not even celebrate. After doing these food/cultural events we would feel proud and we would check the box for multicultural education in our heads.
    Learning Process
  3. Prior Assumptions or Opinions about the described highlight (10 pts.)
    One major assumption I had before reading chapter two of Affirming Diversity was about the way I was teaching history and historical figures of the black community was a sufficient method of teaching using multicultural education. One major example of my pedagogy that was also reflected in this reading was the teaching of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Whenever the time of the year came for this holiday we simply rolled out the tapes and recording of I had a dream. I would make the students watch the speech and discussing the importance of the events that led to the speech. I would later introduce the language objective in which students had to think of ways they could make the world better through their dreams. This was achieved using the infamous and famous starter words of I had a dream. Students would first think of ways the world needed to be changed and then they would use the sentence starter to initiate their solution or their ideal world. I was assuming that it was relevant for me to stop there and move on from teaching them anything more about Martin Luther King Jr.
  4. Source of Assumption or Opinion What made you have such an assumption? (5 pts.)
    The source of my assumption that sanitizing historical figures was a way to teach multicultural learning is unknown to me. There could be many different reasons why I had this assumption. On the other hand, the best answer to this question could be the ignorance. Before reading this chapter I was not aware of the term sanitizing the curriculum. Moreover, I grew up in the Bronx in the mix of a dance Black and Latino population. There were no white students ever around me until I got to university. The teachers that gave me my education in middle school and high school were mostly white but even the few teachers of color that I had all taught these topics the same way or similar to me. It is possible that because I grew up watching the educators of color teach about prominent historical figures by only touching the surface of the topic. There was no deeper connection to us or our experience as individuals of color in the United States. We were also never though the negative actions of these figures so part of my assumption could have been a result of always merely scratching the surface.
  5. Assumption/Opinion Check – Validation/Invalidation (20 pts.)
    Reading this chapter was shocking, embarrassing, and eye-opening at the same time. This was because it allowed me to humble myself and learn about a practice or assumption that I had in the past. My assumption that teaching about rich colorful and deep historical characters by merely mentioning them or scratching the surface of what they are known for was invalidated. Often time I avoided talking about racism and speaking openly about the problem with many historical figures and events. This was invalidated when Sonia Nieto said: “Too many schools avoid confronting, honestly and directly, the negative effects of history, the arts, and sciences. Michael Fine has called this the “fear of Learning,” and it is part of the system of silencing public schools,” (p. 33). At this instant, my previous opinion was checked. Avoiding diving deeper into history and inclosing the negative sides of what happened to us was wrong. Avoiding to speak to my students about the racism that their ancestors faced was not doing them any favors or improving the deep of conversation they could have with each other. In order to protect their feelings I rejected talking about people and experiences that were crucial and similar to theirs. Maybe I did not want to remind them of something that they experience every day but it was the wrong choice because instead I sanitized or clean up the topics my students could embark on.
  6. Realization/Aha Moment or Epiphany (20 pts.)
    Chapter two provided me with many realizations or aha moments. The most significant one that I can think of because I teach it every year to my students was when Sonia Nieto used Dr. Martin Luther King Jr as an example of sanitizing characters. It was a perfect example of what it is like to only scratch the surface with a topic to fulfill a requirement in the curriculum. Sonia Nieto states: “The only thing children know about him is that he kept “having a dream.” School bulletin boards are full of ethereal pictures of Dr. King surrounded by clouds. If children get to hear or read any of his speeches at all, it is his “I Have a Dream” speech. As inspirational as this speech is, it is only one piece of his notable accomplishments. (p.33). Nieto continues to explain that educators barely explore more of the life of Dr. King: “Rare indeed are allusions to his early and consistent oppositions to the Vietnam War; his strong criticism of unbridled capitalism; and the connection he made near the end of his life among racism, capitalism, and war. This sanitation of Martin Luther King, a man full of passion and life, renders him an oversimplified, lifeless figure, in the process making him a “safe hero,” (p.33). reading this hit home because I am certain that if I ask any of my students from this past year about Dr. King all they would say is I have a dream. They would not even possess the knowledge or the academic language to further explains the accomplishments of such an important person in our history. Furthermore, that is why I am extremely thankful to have gotten the opportunity to read Affirming Diversity. I would not have thought about how my students are affected by the lack of real colorful and truthful teaching. I now understand that it is extremely important to push past discomfort to have conversations that are uncomfortable but challenging to students. Without this kind of work, students will walk out of my class without the ability to properly discuss the world around them.
  7. Implications for future teaching practice (20 pts.)
    Due to the realization that my prior assumption was invalidated, I have now realized that there can be many changes made in my teaching. I have to begin to plan out units to identify the topics that are going to be impactful for them. I want to allow students to have an impact on some of the material that we study in class. I want to allow students to be surveyed and to share their opinions as to what they should learn. Subsequently, also allowing them to bring in their own experiences through inquiry questions. I plan to have questioners at the beginning and end of every unit. In this way, I could use their prior knowledge to guide the direction of the unit. I can also use these questions to find out if any of the students have possible real-life connections to the topic. For instance, if we are learning about ending slavery and Abraham Lincoln and through inquiry I find out that one of the students has a relative that has a connection or history with slavery or the ending of. It could be possible to contact that person to come in to speak to the students. To have the students prepare questions and make their experiences and the ones of their family members validated and appreciated by all. Another major step I must take after my realization is planning how I am going to teach my third graders stronger academic language that will help them understand the complexities of history and politics. If we plan to research Dr. King beyond “I Have a Dream,” my students need to understand ideas like communism and capitalism. In the end, there is much work to be done that will be active and heavily involving of the student’s opinions, experiences, and expectations. The reason why it will be difficult but rewarding is that antiracism education is not done inactively. As Sonia Nieto stated in chapter two: “To be anti-racist is not a passive act; it proposes working actively to combat racism…it means making anti-discrimination explicit parts of the curriculum and teaching young people skills in confronting racism.” (p. 33).
    Bibliography

  8. Nieto, Sonia & Bode, Patty (2018). Affirming Diversity. The Sociopolitical Context of Multicultural Education. Seventh Edition, Pearson, New York
Featured

New York State Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages 2021 Conference Registration is Open! Looking Forward: Educational Empowerment & Transformative Education

NYS TESOL is thrilled to announce that the 51st Annual Conference will be hybrid, with virtual and in-person options. We currently have a LIMITED NUMBER of seats available!

NYS TESOL advocates, advances, and enriches TESOL education and professionalism statewide. NYS TESOL is an association of professionals concerned with the education of English language learners at all levels of public and private education in New York State. Our interests include classroom practices, research, program and curriculum development, employment, funding, and legislation.

NYS TESOL is thrilled to announce that the 51st Annual Conference will be hybrid, with virtual and in-person options. We currently have a LIMITED NUMBER of seats available! You may register for:


Virtual Day (Thursday, November 4) – Participate from the comfort of your own home via zoom.
Virtual Day (Thursday, November 4) plus ONE in-person day (either Friday, November 5 or Saturday, November 6) at the Sonesta Hotel in White Plains, NY.
Virtual Day (Thursday, November 4) plus TWO in-person days (Friday, November 5 AND Saturday, November 6) at the Sonesta Hotel in White Plains, NY.
ALL Conference Registrations include 2022 NYS TESOL membership.
If you are a current NYS TESOL member, please log-in before registering in order to ensure you receive a discounted rate.
There will be NO on-site registration this year.
*Registration rates will increase by $30 on October 1st.
Event Date: 11/4/2021 – 11/6/2021
Event Time: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM Eastern

Register here: https://mms.nystesol.org/Calendar/moreinfo.php?eventid=64899

We are offering three full days of workshops, plenary speakers, and practical sessions. This year we will also have virtual, international site visits, an administrator ENL boot camp (focus on ENL regulations and best practices), and speed networking sessions. Plus, be sure to join us for our dinner and dance party on Friday night! We currently have a LIMITED NUMBER of seats available so don’t delay! We encourage all teachers, teacher educators, support staff, and administrators to attend the conference. Whether you are an ENL/Bilingual teacher, an elementary teacher, a high school math teacher, an adult educator, or a college professor, we will have sessions geared toward you. Our complete conference line-up is coming soon! You have the opportunity to earn up to 6 CTLE credits per day of attendance. 2022 NYS TESOL membership is included with ALL conference registrations. Please share this conference information with anyone in your network who may be interested in attending! If you have any questions, please email pres@nystesol.org. Register here. If you are a current NYS TESOL member, be sure to use the email address associated with your account in order to receive a discounted rate. You can also book your Sonesta Hotel room for a reduced rate using the code here.

We would also like to announce the winners of our Student Logo Contest! Congratulations to Elio (4th grade) and Roxana (6th grade), two multilingual students from Taconic Hills Central School District in the Capital Region!! We love collaborations, and this year we were so impressed by all of our logo contest submissions that it was difficult to choose just one winner – so we chose two!

We have combined Elio and Roxana’s logo submissions to create our NYS TESOL 51st Annual Conference Logo! Their logo will appear in all promotional materials for our upcoming conference. A special thank you to their teacher, Martine Van Ness, for submitting their designs. And thank you to everyone who entered and to all of the teachers who encouraged their students to participate! Check out the logo at nystesol.org.

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Touro TESOL Candidate Michelle Velez on Program Options for English Language Learners/Multilingual Learners with Personal Teaching Illustrations

EDPN 673 Methods and Materials for Teaching English as a Second Language provides a historical overview of second language acquisition theories and teaching methods. Students learn how to apply current approaches, methods and techniques, with attention to the effective use of materials, in teaching English as a second language. Students will engage in the planning and implementation of standards-based ESL instruction which includes differentiated learning experiences geared to students’ needs. Emphasis is placed on creating culturally responsive learning environments. Ms. Velez submitted an outstanding Discussion Board Contribution.

Michelle Velez is a 1st grade teacher in the South Bronx. She has worked in the education field since 2015, holding various titles. Ms. Velez feels that “obtaining an advanced certificate in TESOL is my goal in order to better assist my students on their language acquisition journey.”

What are the basic tools and techniques for effective second language/foreign language teaching?

There are three main parts to effective second language/foreign language teaching, which are approach, design, and procedure. The grouping of students plays a large role in an ENL classroom for the students. One type of grouping depends on the L2 language of one of the students. If a student acquiring the L2 is paired with another who has some grasp on the L2 it is helpful. The student is able to work with another in the target language that is accessible to them, and not going to frustrate them because they are able to understand each other. It is more valuable to ELL students to work in pairs or groups than individually because they are able to have valuable conversation in the L2 with their peers, which fosters growth. From personal experience I found that ELL students prefer and become excited when paired with peers because it is a greater benefit in learning the L2 and fosters growth over time. A student’s classmate can help in ways us educators cannot sometimes because they have their own way of communicating and understanding each other. Another important part of the classroom is the different types of talk the teacher has with the students. Whether it’s small talk about the weather or the past weekend, pre-lesson talks about the upcoming lesson or the previous one. Another important aspect in the classroom is providing feedback when needed. Wait time when asking a question to ELL students is very important and much needed. ELL students need a longer wait time in order to process the questions being asked. Asking multiple questions in a short amount of time can potentially overwhelm and cause a student to shut down. I have seen this first hand while I was student teaching years ago. The student put his head down and refused to talk because it was too much information coming at him at once.

Give specific illustrative example examples of YOUR PERSONAL teacher classroom discourse IN YOUR CLASSES

In a third grade classroom we started our mystery unit by drawing the student in. We had a class plant that was watered by the students when needed. To get the students hooked we hid the plant in the closet with dirt left behind. The students noticed the plant was gone and we asked if anything they have has went missing before and what were the steps they used to try and find it. We talked a little about this to make a relatable connection to their lives. As this question was opened to the class, we had a short turn and talk with their assigned partners. Our ELL students were paired with two others, one ELL and non-ELL student to foster and encourage conversations. Later in this unit we read a mystery book (3rd Grade Detective Series) and students were asked to answer comprehension questions based on what was read following in each chapter. As a class we would start the discussion about the chapters then students were asked to go back and answer a few on their own or in pairs. While the students are working we did provide visual supports or modified questions when needed. Most common visual supports are sentence starters.

PRETEND THAT YOU OBSERVE YOUR OWN CLASS – use the sample classroom observation feedback form p. 361 in your textbook and reflect on what you learned about your planning, teaching and assessment.

Lesson Quality: The lesson achieved its initial objectives to introduce the next unit of study, mystery. Michelle was able to pace the lesson appropriately for all of the students, taking her time and not rushing through any questions students may have about the topic. Students were engaged and able to be apart of the opening of the lesson, which helped draw student’s interest.

Teacher Presentation: All aspects of the presentation were clear for students to understand. Students were engaged and focused on the lesson presentation and class conversations. Students were grouped not based on academic levels, but students were grouped based on abilities to bring out the best in their peers, especially with ELL students.

Student Participation: Students showed a high interest level in the lesson, especially the pre-lesson introduction with the missing class plant. While reading the book students also showed a high interest in class discussions sharing their thoughts about the mystery present in the book.

Looking back on this particular lesson I think engaging the students in the pre-lesson “the missing class plant” was very effective in getting the students excited about mysteries. They were able to somehow connect it to their own lives, which is important for all students, even more so for ELL students. Students were also given ample opportunity to converse and work on their verbal language with peers. Students worked in several grouping opportunities, whole class, pair, and small groups. Students were also provided with visual supports and modified questions.

If I had to change anything for this lesson I would break down the chapters a little more instead of asking comprehension questions about the entire chapter. Some of the chapters were long, making some students frustrated when trying to find answers and evidence to support those answers.

On p 389 in your textbook -391 you will find textbook evaluation checklists.  Take one book YOU USE CURRENTLY in YOUR classroom and analyze it with those checklists. Reflect on what you learned in your answer in the DB with specific, descriptive examples.

The book I picked is the enVision Math book we use in first grade. In the first section of the checklist, curriculum this book covers the topics needed for my first grade students, however the time frame for each section feels rushed. Students do not get enough time to work on their skills for each topic instead each topic is rushed. Often I find myself spending more than one day on topics rather than rushing just to get through the topics we need to be covered in the school year. One example of this can be found in topic 3, where we cover addition facts to 20 by using various strategies. Each lesson adds upon the last, for example, the first lesson’s focus is counting on to add followed by counting on to add using an open number line. It is a positive that each concept builds upon the previous, but there is not a sufficient number of examples for the students to refer to if needed support. In the lesson using a number line, there is one example given for the students to refer back to. Another issue students can face is the students need to then create their own number lines in order to solve 9 questions. If the students were not exposed to number lines prior to this lesson it may be a lot to assume students will understand the concept of using a number line so quickly. One part of the checklist that stood out and is often not represented well in the textbooks we use in schools is the cultural & age group sensitivities. For example, one of the word problems in this topic mentions the zoo, pounds, and tortoises. Some of my students have no prior experience with going to zoos or they have no idea what tortoises are. This word problem is supposed to be completed independently. If they are not able to read the words how are they supposed to be able to solve the problem. Often I notice the students either completely skip the word problems provided in this textbook or they get stuck on the words and concepts not familiar to them. This textbook has its positive aspects but also many negatives that make it difficult for my students to grasp concepts.

Gather some information on student assessment from your school district. What kinds of student assessments are regularly administered, and in what language? If the district includes non-native speakers of English, are testing and assessment requirements modified or altered in any way to accommodate them? If so, how?

Prior to the pandemic one assessment administered was the MOSOL, which is supposed to measure student learning in the beginning of the year and at the end of the year. The MOSOL is given to students in English. If students need translation of the questions we try to provide that if we can. In some cases we do not have an adult that speaks a certain language and able to translate for the student. Often we encourage the students to try their best, sometimes we do have the ENL teacher to take her group of students to administer the MOSOL assessment. She will read each question and answers in the student’s L1. Another assessment given to students is the NYSESLAT at the end of each school year. This assessment measures an ELL student’s English proficiency. This assessment is given to students in English, as it’s purpose to measure student’s ability in English.

In NYS, what are the Program Options for English Language Learners/Multilingual Learners?

Students can be in a Transitional Bilingual Education Program (TBE). Students in this program learn to read, write, speak, and understand in English. Simultaneously, students are learning content in their L1. It is the goal of these students to eventually learning in only English. Dual language programs give students the opportunity to become multilingual. One-way dual programs instruction is given in the student’s L1 and in English. In two-way dual programs is for native English speakers and ELL students. Instruction is in both English and the new language. ENL programs focuses on acquiring English. Some students receive push-in instruction and other received pullout instruction in the core content.

What is the purpose of Commissioner’s Regulations – Sections 117

The purpose of Sections 117 is to screen new students in a school to see if they are gifted, having a disability, and or an ELL student.

How do the BLUEPRINT FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNER/MULTILINGUAL LEARNER (ELL/MLL) SUCCESS and CR Part 154 Comprehensive ELL Education Plan (CEEP) and ENL staffing requirements connect with each other? 

These three connect with each other because they focus on the success of the ELL students. All of these outline ways to help better assist ENL students on their way through the journey of language acquisition. Depending on the level of the ELL student determines how often the ENL teacher will meet with them per week.

Celce-Murcia, M. (2001). Teaching English as a second or foreign language. Heinle & Heinle.

Commissioner’s Regulations – Sections 117.1-3. NYSED. (n.d.). http://www.p12.nysed.gov/sss/lawsregs/117-1-3.html.

Program Options for ELLs and MLs. New York State Education Department. (n.d.). http://www.nysed.gov/bilingual-ed/program-options-english-language-learnersmultilingual-learners.

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Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin on Education and Globalization: Artificial Intelligence, Augmented Reality Digital Technologies, and Distributed Ledger Technology Networks – Proceedings of the 15th International Multi-Conference on Society Cybernetics and Informatics: IMSCI 2021©

The convergence of data, computation, and globalization in education has far-reaching consequences for educational stakeholders, institutions, and learners. Terms such as the Fourth Industrial Revolution, artificial intelligence (AI), exponential technology, deep learning, personalized competency-based learning, and distributed ledger technology networks (DLTNs) are indicators of the changing dialogue between education stakeholders, businesses, and government aspirations on a global scale. Location-independent virtual environments promise an exponential expansion that goes beyond brick-and mortar schools, colleges, and universities.

It is my pleasure to share the publication of my most recent article:

Cowin, J. (2021). Education and Globalization: Artificial Intelligence, Augmented Reality Digital Technologies, and Distributed Ledger Technology Networks. Proceedings of the 15th International Multi-Conference on Society, Cybernetics and Informatics: IMSCI 2021, 56–61.

About the Social and Organizational Informatics and Cybernetics: SOIC 2021©
in the context of The 15th International Multi-Conference on Society, Cybernetics and Informatics: IMSCI 2021©

July 18 – 21, 2021 ~ Virtual Conference

Many social, societal and organizational problems, in the information age, are interrelated and need to be solved jointly by means of multidisciplinary projects, interdisciplinary communications and/or trans-disciplinary concepts and methodologies.

Informatics, Cybernetics and Cyber-Technologies (ICCT) are, by definition and by nature, transversal to many disciplines and, as such, are special means for the multi-, inter-, and trans-disciplinary approaches required.

ICCT are helping in the solutions of an increasing social, societal and organizational problems, but they are also generating new kind of problems and raising unfamiliar questions. The processes of answering these questions and finding possible solutions to these kinds of problems require as much as of scientific/engineering approaches, as of conceptual/reflexive studies.

Both, analogical and logical thinking are also required, in different complementary studies, as well as combined in the same one. In this context logical thinking without the analogical one would be sterile, and analogical thinking without the logical one would be dangerous for being prone to hidden errors and mistakes.

In the context of this framework, the basic purpose of the Organizing Committee of SOIC 2021 is to a provide a forum for disciplinary and interdisciplinary communications, where researchers (in Social and Natural Sciences, as well as in Engineering), intellectuals, policy/decision makers and Consultants would share the results of their research, studies and thoughts, with regards to societies and private/public organizations in the context of the Information Age.

http://www.iiis2021.org/imsci/website/default.asp?vc=11

ABSTRACT (1)

Jasmin (Bey) Cowin, Ed.D.


The convergence of data, computation, and globalization in education has far-reaching consequences for educational stakeholders, institutions, and learners. Terms such as the Fourth Industrial Revolution, artificial intelligence (AI), exponential technology, deep learning, personalized competency-based learning, and distributed ledger technology networks (DLTNs) are indicators of the changing dialogue between education stakeholders, businesses, and government aspirations on a global scale. Location-independent virtual environments promise an exponential expansion that goes beyond brick-and mortar schools, colleges, and universities.

AI and intelligent systems are poised to become global change agents in education, ushering in profound changes in administrative functions, strategic planning, data aggregation, student acquisition and retention, and alternative currencies, as well as curriculum design, assessment, personal learning networks, and global competitiveness generally of both institutions and their graduates. The quality of the education a nation’s schools, educational institutions, and teachers provide, along with investments in science, technology engineering, and mathematics education, directly impact economic prosperity and global competitiveness.

This paper explores some of the interdependencies that arise from supercharged technological advances such as AI augmented reality digital technologies (ARDTs) and DLTNs and their possible impact on education, educators, learners, and society. In addition, it unbundles the meaning and use cases of AI, ARDTs, and DLTNs in education.


1 The author gratefully acknowledges Prof. Ching-Ching Lin, Ed.D., Touro College, GSE for her insightful peer review of this paper.

Keywords:
Fourth Industrial Revolution, Artificial Intelligence, Exponential Technology, Deep Learning, Personalized Competency-based Learning, Natural Language Processing and Distributed Ledger Technology Networks

Featured

Zoom Seminar – Yemeni TESOL Teaching for the Future: Exploring Open Educational Resources (OERs) and Virtual Spaces 

Future Horizons Foundation for Translation, Training and Development together with President Prof. Abdullah Al Ghurbani and Prof. Jasmin Bey Cowin proudly present a free seminar on July 27th, 2021 from 1 pm to 2:30 pm aimed at continued professional TESOL development for all its alumni and graduates. This free seminar and workshop and attendance is limited to the Foundation’s Alumni. 

Future Horizons Foundation for Translation, Training and Development together with President Prof. Abdullah Al Ghurbani and Prof. Jasmin Bey Cowin proudly present a free seminar on July 27th, 2021 from 1 pm to 2:30 pm aimed at continued professional TESOL development for all its alumni and graduates. This free seminar and workshop and attendance is limited to the Foundation’s Alumni. 

Please click this link https://forms.gle/BudCNdevNb5HLAnk9 to sign up.
Yemeni TESOL Teaching for the Future: Exploring Open Educational Resources (OERs) and Virtual Spaces 


This Zoom seminar will focus on educational resources for TESOL teaching such as public digital libraries, open educational resources, and virtual rooms in hubs. The aim is to create access and equity for Yemini TESOL teachers to free materials, resources, and contemporary technology. 
If you are a confirmed Future Horizons Foundation for Translation, Training and Development Alumni you will receive a link via the provided email from the form.

Presenter Bio: Dr. Jasmin Bey Cowin
Assistant Professor and TESOL Practicum Coordinator,
Touro College, GSE, NY


Dr. Cowin’s pro-bono work is seated in a deep professional and personal commitment to transcending boundaries and bringing universal access to high-quality teacher education and professional teacher development. As a Fulbright Scholar; Assistant Professor and TESOL Practicum Coordinator at Touro College, GSE; Chair of the 51st New York State TESOL fall 2021,  she brings over twenty-five years of experience as an educator and institutional leader. 

As an Education Policy Fellow at the EPFP™ Institute, Columbia University/Teachers College, she became part of a select group of strategic leaders analyzing trends regarding effective educational policy and leadership. Her EPFP™ focus was on three pillars: The Fourth Industrial Revolution, Leadership, and Educational Policy furthering her understanding of the challenges that lie at the heart of education inequity. 

Dr. Cowin’s extensive background in education, administration, not-for-profit leadership, entrepreneurial spirit, commitment to the idea of education as a basic human right, technology innovation, and demonstrated sensitivity to cultural communication differences; provide her with unique skills and vertical networks locally and globally.
https://drcowinj-locationindependentteach.com/about/ 

Featured

Touro College GSE TESOL Candidate Jason Madrick on Sociopolitical Contexts of Multicultural Education in Public Education for Course EDPN-671

In synchronous online courses discussion boards are in integral part of student analysis and peer cross-pollination. Touro TESOL Candidate Jason Madrick submitted a thoughtful, reflective, exemplary discussion board contribution for the course Theory and Practice of Bilingual and Multicultural Education EDPN-671.

In synchronous online courses discussion boards are an integral part of student analysis and peer cross-pollination. Touro TESOL Candidate Jason Madrick submitted a thoughtful, reflective, exemplary discussion board contribution for the course Theory and Practice of Bilingual and Multicultural Education EDPN-671. This course reviews the impact of historical, legal, sociological, and political issues in relationship to the education of culturally and linguistically diverse students. It is designed to prepare bilingual and ESOL teachers to work successfully with language minority students, in the context of bilingual ESL programs. It includes the study of the historical, psychological, social, cultural, political, theoretical and legal foundations of bilingual education programs in the United States. Students will examine and analyze different bilingual program models so that they may apply such knowledge to the implementation of pedagogically effective practices for second language learners using both the L1 and the L2 in curriculum implementation. Communication with parents and families concerning students’ academic and social outcomes will be highlighted. The course supports Touro College’s commitment to preparing educational professionals to work in diverse urban and suburban settings. Students explore the evolution of attitudes regarding bilingualism and multiculturalism in the United States. Emphasis is placed on developing multicultural competence as educators, with areas of focus including cross-cultural communication in the classroom and with parents; how the language and culture of the home and the community impact student learning; cultural factors in the relationships between the school and the community. Models of multicultural and bilingual education will be presented and analyzed. Includes 10 hours of fieldwork.

Jason Madrick was born and raised in Queens, NY. He has been an illustrator, musician, and overall creative person. Mr. Madrick is graduate of Syracuse University with BA degrees in Biology and Anthropology and minors in Sociology and Education. He has taught as a substitute teacher in public elementary schools in Queens, and then in the UPK program for more than a decade combined. Jason Madrick wrote: “I look forward to embarking on the next stage of my career in education being employed by the NYC DOE this coming fall and using my artistic and musical talents, love of reading, nature, science and more to convey and hopefully instill a love of learning in my future students.”

The Discussion Board prompts are in Italic

In your own words, provide a brief summary (4-6 sentences) of one of the major concepts presented in Chapter 1: Affirming Diversity, The Sociopolitical Context of Multicultural Education. Seventh Edition, Pearson, New York (Nieto, Sonia & Bode, Patty,2018). You may select any concept within the chapter. Choose one that you find unique, interesting, and/or worthy of intellectual discussion.

Jason Madrick : In the last section of Chapter One of our text “Affirming Diversity: The Sociopolitical Context of Multicultural Education” by Sonia Nieto and Paddy Bode, one of the concepts that caught my attention was the influence of private industry in public schools, and the heavy focus on high stakes standardized testing. These testing practices had grown out of the policies and curriculum changes that can be linked back to the publication of the “A Nation at Risk” in 1983. (Nieto & Bode, 2018). From there, the No Child Left Behind Act or NCLB continued this trend of focusing on high stakes testing, and the links between private industries and charter schools in particular is alarming in the enormous influence they have on our public education system in the United States. The “testing industrial complex” (Nieto & Bode, 2018) is a term I had not heard before reading this chapter, but it seems incredibly accurate to me based on my own observations and experiences with the company who has published every text book I have used so far in graduate school, Pearson. Pearson is also the same company I had to gather and input data for during my recent teaching experiences in the UPK program. Described in this chapter as a “monstrous carnivore” that devours public school funding, (Nieto & Bode, 2018) Pearson, I think is just one example of the many private companies whose quest for profits is in direct conflict with the noble goals of public education.

Provide a brief discussion/introduction/explanation of the sociopolitical context of your school environment. If you don’t currently work in a school, you may choose to discuss your workplace or school that you attended. Provide some background information so that others can build an understanding of your specific environment.

Jason Madrick: I am currently not teaching during this school year, but I would like to discuss the sociopolitical context of the two schools I worked at through the UPK program. The first of these schools was located in Whitestone, Queens, and the second location was in Jamaica, Queens. I think my familiarity with those schools is more up to date than my own elementary school experiences, though the memories and details of those years are still very much intact. The first school where I taught in the UPK program was located in Whitestone, Queens in what I would classify as a middle class to upper middle class, to wealthy in terms of economic resources for the area and families of students who attended this school. There was even a golf course and country club located within walking distance of the school. The population of the school included students from several different cultural backgrounds including White, African-America, Latino, and Asian students. Religious faiths represented among the student and family populations included Christianity, Judaism, Muslim, and Athiest/Agnostics. The languages spoken by students included English, Spanish, Chinese, Korean, and Japanese. The majority of the teaching and administrative staff at this school was predominantly White and from a middle to upper middle class background. There were four general education UPK classrooms at this school.

The second school location that I was teaching in UPK was located in Jamaica, Queens. This school was predominantly a 4410 program, with a dozen special education classrooms, but had created four to five integrated UPK classrooms in their basement. These integrated classes were meant to be populated by half general education students, and half special education students. The cultural and religious backgrounds of the students and families at this school was predominantly Latino, Southeast Asian, and African-Americans. There were also White and Asian students present in the program as well. The economic background of many of the families based on my limited observations as well as limits of communication due to language differences at this school I think definitely represented a larger proportion of lower income families, including those who were on public assistance and/or homeless. Religious faiths at this school included Christians, Jews, Muslims, Hindu, and Atheist/Agnostics. There were multiple languages spoken by students at home including English, Spanish, Chinese, Bangali, Punjabi, and Urdu. Among the staff including lead teacher and teaching assistants there are a number of languages spoken besides English including Spanish, Arabic, Bangali, Punjabi, Urdo, Chinese, and Russian. One observation and big difference I noticed between these two schools I taught at was the huge increase in absences and habitual lateness of students at this second location compared to the school in Whitestone. I had some students from the two classes I taught at this school that had missed more than a third of the total scheduled days of class.

Comment on one of the videos presented in this week’s readings. This is slightly flexible, but have fun with it. Choose something within the video to discuss here in this board. It could be something you enjoyed learning, something you disagree with, or something that sparked curiosity.

Jason Madrick: I enjoyed watching the Ted Talk video featuring Elijah Jones on Diverse Education for a student in the Education System, TEDxYouth@Wilmington. Elijah is a student at a private school and spends much of his talk discussing how socioeconomic matters have a significant impact on the resources, both materials and instructional talent that are available to students depending on where the live and their economic means. Ultimately he speaks about how our public school system has become increasingly segregated along racial and socioeconomic lines. At one point he mentions that at his private school, there weren’t any “teachers of color” and that he felt like he was “definitely not in Kansas anymore”. His private school had given him access to top level resources, teachers and extracurricular activities. He laments that what it does not provide him with is a substantial level of diversity among his peers, and that this is not going to be helpful for his future. This future he discusses is the one in which the population of students in the USA is rapidly changing both along cultural and ethnic lines, but also along economic ones. He states at one point that recently, and for the first time, more than half of all school age children are from low income families. Elijah continues to speak towards the ideal that to live in an increasingly multicultural society, he, and other students need and should be exposed to a diverse student population, as well as being able to have access to proper learning resources and instructors. He also says that for race relations and divisions among the people of this country to improve, that discussions and opportunities to talk about these relations and problems need to continue.

References

Nieto, Sonia & Bode, Patty (2018). Affirming Diversity. The Sociopolitical Context of Multicultural Education. Seventh Edition, Pearson, New York

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The 11th International Breakfast meeting in the 111th year of the Rotary Club of New York with Irena Zubcevic, Chief of Intergovernmental Policy and Review Branch at the UN and Elira Karaja, Ph.D,an economist and Fellow at Columbia University and Sustainability Specialist

Today, May 19th, 2021 we had an extraordinary presentation by Irena Zubcevic, Chief of Intergovernmental Policy and Review Branch at the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs on the history and outlook on the Sustainable Development Goals 2030. RCNY member Elira Karaja, Ph.D. an economist and Fellow at Columbia University and Sustainability Specialist within the United Nations System.

Irena Zubcevic


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Consul General of the Republic of Kazakhstan in New York – Almat Aidarbekov to speak at Rotary Club of New York United Nations International Breakfast Meeting June 16th, 2021

Consul General of the Republic of Kazakhstan in New York – Almat Aidarbekov to speak at Rotary Club of New York United Nations International Breakfast Meeting

As the Chair of the Rotary Club of New York’s United Nations International Breakfast Meeting is is my great honor to announce the speaking engagement of the Consul General of the Republic of Kazakhstan in New York Almat Aidarbekov.

This will be a very special meeting as it not only celebrates Kazakhstan’s 30th year of independence but also my retirement as Chair of the Rotary Club of NEw York International Breakfast meetings. It was an honor to arrange for the meetings in service to RCNY and host such notable diplomats.

Kazakhstan is the world’s largest landlocked country, and the ninth-largest country in the world. It has a population of 18.8 million residents, and has one of the lowest population densities in the world, at fewer than 6 people per square kilometre (15 people per sq mi). Since 1997, the capital is Nur-Sultan, formerly known as Astana. It was moved from Almaty, the country’s largest city. 2021 marks the 30th year of Independence Day. Kazakhstan became a sovereign state after the Supreme Council adopted a law on the state independence of Kazakhstan on Dec. 16, 1991. I had the great joy to visit Kazakhstan for it’s fantastic World Expo in 2017.

Kazakhstan World Tech Fair 2017

Established on July 27, 2009 Consulate General of the Republic of Kazakhstan in New York within its consular district provides consular and legal assistance to citizens of the Republic of Kazakhstan and provides state and consular services to Kazakhstan citizens and residents of the United States. Our Consulate offers mutually beneficial cooperation between Kazakhstan and the states of the consular district in economic, cultural and humanitarian fields.
Consular district of the Consulate General of Kazakhstan in New York includes the following states:
Connecticut, Minnesota, Vermont, Illinois, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Iowa, New Hampshire, Indiana, Maine, New York, Ohio, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Michigan and Rhode Island.


General information about Consul General Aidarbekov
Education
Undergraduate degree in International Relations at Ankara University
Master’s degree in Public Management from Carnegie Mellon University
Career
Almat Aidarbekov started his career at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Kazakhstan in 1998 as a desk officer at the Asia, Middle East and Africa Division of the Fourth Department.
In 1999-2000 held position of Attaché at the Department for Bilateral Cooperation.
In 2000 worked at the Attaché at the Embassy of the Republic of Kazakhstan in the Republic of Turkey.
In March, 2003 returned to the Foreign Ministry and held consecutive positions of Second and First Secretary at the Department of Europe and America. From 2004 to 2007, Mr. Aidarbekov was in Head of Consular Section position at the Embassy of Kazakhstan in United Kingdom and Northern Ireland.
In 2007-2014 served as Second, First Secretary and later as Counselor of the Embassy of Kazakhstan in the United States.
In 2014-2019 held several positions at the Foreign Policy Division of the Presidential Administration of Kazakhstan.
Since November 1, 2019 Mr. Aidarbekov serves as Consul General of the Republic of Kazakhstan in New York.
Speaks English, Russian and Turkish. Holds the diplomatic rank of Counselor of First Class. Married, has three children

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Jasmin Bey Cowin, Ed.D. to speak at the virtual 26th Annual NATE Conference Digital Change in the ELT Community in Moscow, Russia

The 2021 NATE Conference is dedicated to Digital Change in the ELT Community. Never has the world faced such fast-paced change and vast digitalization and, as a result, required such spur-of-the-moment creativity and agility from educational professionals. We are in this process together and have a lot of personal and professional experience to share.

Dr. Bey Cowin’s conference topic will be: Innovation, Collaboration, Transformation: Education for a Connected World. The conference host is the National University of Science and Technology.

Globally, the way we educate and are educated is changing at a rapid pace. New technologies and ways of interpreting the world are reshaping educational philosophies and their underpinning pedagogies while transforming modes of delivery in educational institutions worldwide. This presentation explores the necessity of rethinking education for a successful integration in the artificial intelligence (AI) age.

The need to adapt by educational institutions, corporations, teachers, and learners is great. However, what kind of frameworks are necessary for education in the digital age? What resources will be necessary to bring education into digital classrooms from early childhood through tertiary and technical education? What trends and possibilities are on the horizon to educate and train entire generations of educators to stay relevant in the 21st Century and beyond? Five emerging trends for 21st-century education will be explored.

Featured

The International Research and Review Journal of Phi Beta Delta Honor Society for International Scholars publication of Dr. Jasmin Bey Cowin’s article “Digital Worlds and Transformative Learning: Google Expeditions, Google Arts and Culture, and the Merge Cube”

I am delighted to announce that the International Research and Review Journal of Phi Beta Delta, Honor Society for International Scholars, Volume 10, Number 1 Fall 2020, with Michael B. Smithee, Ed.D., Editor published my article Digital Worlds and Transformative Learning: Google Expeditions, Google Arts and Culture, and the Merge Cube

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NYS TESOL 51st Annual Conference Looking Forward: Educational Empowerment & Transformative Education

Please consider submitting a proposal for the hybrid NYS TESOL 51st Annual Conference on November 4, 5, & 6 2021.

The Call for Proposals for the NYS TESOL 51st Annual Conference (November 4-6) is live!  Our theme this year is Looking Forward: Educational Empowerment & Transformative Education.  We are tentatively planning a hybrid conference, with a virtual component and a live component. 

Please consider submitting a proposal for the hybrid NYS TESOL 51st Annual Conference on November 4, 5, & 6 2021.

Locations:Virtual Day
Online
Face-to-Face Location
Sonesta White Plains Downtown
66 Hale Avenue
White Plains, NY 10601

Proposal Deadline: March 28th, 2021
Notification of acceptance: by August 1st, 2021

The NYS TESOL 51st Annual Conference invites you to participate, present and collaborate along with the TESOL community across New York State and the globe.We invite any proposal that ties in with our theme to engage attendees in conversations around Looking Forward: Educational Empowerment & Transformative Education. This includes emerging trends, issues and solutions in TESOL education.   

Please consider presenting, sharing and discussing ideas related to the conference theme within the following categories:Adult Education
Applied Linguistics

  • Adult Education
  • Advocacy
  • Applied Linguistics
  • Bilingual Education
  • Elementary Education
  • Higher Education
  • Secondary Education
  • Special Education
  • Teacher Education
  • Teaching English Internationally
  • Technology Integration

Submit proposals herehttp://bit.ly/NYSTESOLProposals2021 
Virtual Day, November 4th, 2021 

  • Virtual Poster sessions: features successful lesson plans, projects and/or research studies.
  • Virtual Presentations: either a live or short pre-recorded presentation intended to feature successful lessons, projects, reports on work in progress, and/or research studies. Virtual Presentations will be accessible on the NYS TESOL website during the Annual 51st Conference.
  • Commercial: NYS TESOL accepts a limited number of Commercial Presentations, those given by publishers or sponsors of publisher’s materials. These require purchase of  a virtual exhibitor space and must be specifically marked as Commercial.

Face to Face at the Sonesta White Plains Downtown Conference Venue
November 5th & 6th, 2021

Session descriptions:

  • Poster Presentations: presentations that feature successful lesson plans, projects and research studies.
  • Paper Presentation: presentations that summarize research or studies in process in a particular field. It provides the audience with a rapid and intensive overview of research and allows for in-depth discussion among presenters and the audience.  (20 minutes)
  • Workshop/Demonstration: presentations that provide hands-on learning opportunities and specific takeaways that enable participants to gain more expertise in a particular area of interest, or interactive exercises designed to address a challenge. (50 minutes)
  • Panel: presentations that explore a specific issue from the diverse points of view expressed by the participants. (50 minutes)
  • 20 Minute Teaching Tip: short format presentations that allow presenters to share a quick strategy, game, or tool that facilitates instruction in the classroom. Teaching tips should be practical in focus and simple enough to be explained in a 20-minute format.
  • Commercial: presentations that are given by publishers or sponsors and showcase publisher’s materials. These require purchase of exhibitor space and must be specifically marked as Commercial.

NOTE: Paid registration to the conference will be necessary to present.
For more information, please contact:
Jasmin Cowin/Conference Chairperson: vpconference@nystesol.org
Carmen Diaz/Proposal Chair:  proposals@nystesol.org

While we are planning a hybrid conference with both virtual and face-to face events, the fluidity of the Covid situation continues to create uncertainty in the conference planning process. We will keep you informed as to any updates. 

NYS TESOL advocates, advances, and enriches TESOL education and professionalism statewide. NYS TESOL is an association of professionals concerned with the education of English language learners at all levels of public and private education in New York State. Our interests include classroom practices, research, program and curriculum development, employment, funding, and legislation.

Featured

Teaching and Learning Theories Wheel by Jasmin Bey Cowin Ed.D.

As I continue working with infographics I have come to the conclusion that infographics are a two-part data analysis tool.

As I continue working with infographics I have come to the conclusion that infographics are a two-part data analysis tool: First, infographics offer the opportunity to parse information through visualization ideations. Second, the design process for creating an infographic can itself be a form of analysis with the creation of a new design becoming part of the designers meaning-making.

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Miklós GÓR-NAGY – Hungarian Trade Attaché to speak at the Rotary Club of New York United Nations International Breakfast Meeting Feb. 17, 2021

As Chair of the Rotary Club of New York United Nations International Breakfast Meeting it is my pleasure to announce our next guest speaker: Miklós GÓR-NAGY, Hungarian Trade Attaché

In addition to his career as a professional athlete, he graduated from International Business School with a degree in economics and marketing, and earned a law degree from the Károli Gáspár Reformed University. He also has an international water polo referee and coach degree. He has been working at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade since 2019. In 2020, he began his service at the Consulate General in New York as a trade attaché. He is married and has two young children, Gordon and Abigel.

From 1992 to 2019 he was a professional water polo player. He has played for BVSC, Eger, Honvéd, Budvanska Rivijera Budva, OSC, and Ferencváros. He played his first national team match in 2005, under the captaincy of Dénes Kemény. He has participated in five world championships, three European championships, played 435 first division water polo matches in the Hungarian championship, and 200 he has times caps in the Hungarian national team.

Results Selected: FINA World Champion – Barcelona (2013), FINA World Championship silver – Budapest (2017), European Championship silver – Belgrade 2006, Budapest (2014), European Championship bronze – Belgrade (2016), World League silver – 4x , World Cup silver – Almaty (2014), European Youth Champion (2001), Juniur World Championship and European Championship silver medals.

Results in club teams: 3x Hungarian champion, 3x Hungarian Cup winner, 3x Hungarian Super Cup winner, LEN Champions League winner (FTC – 2019), LEN Super Cup winner (FTC – 2019), Montenegrian Cup winner (Budva – 2008)

Wed, February 17, 2021 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM EST

Register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rotary-club-of-new-york-international-breakfast-virtual-2172021-tickets-140300144509

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Holo Sail Holdings, Inc, Global Supply Chain Logistics and SDG 8 by John P. Walker II and Dr. Jasmin Cowin

John P. Walker II, Holo Sail Holdings, Inc: President / Chairman and Dr. Jasmin Cowin, Holo Sail Holdings, Inc: Advisor to Executive Management are featured in a publication by The American Reporter. Read our vision on disruptive technologies, black swans, a possible job famine and integrating automation into the fabric of our shared humanity through resource efficiency in consumption and production as Holo Sail Holdings vision of a prosperous and promising future.

Featured

Thomas Missong, President of the European Association of Credit Rating Agencies (EACRA) speaks at the United Nations Rotary Club of New York International Breakfast Meeting on January 20th, 2021

Thomas MissongPresident of the European Association of Credit Rating Agencies (EACRA)

TOPIC: “Credit Rating Agencies: stocktaking in times of crisis, Competition and international Framework“.

Date And Time
Wed, January 20, 2021 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM EST

Since 2010, Thomas Missong is the President of the European Association of Credit Rating Agencies (EACRA), registered in Paris, France, currently representing 9 credit rating agencies registered in the Euroepan Union and 3 in Switzerland, Turkey and Russia. Additionally, Thomas is a Managing Director at RATINGPLATFORM, a specialized website on ratings on a global level. He acted as independent Board Member of Russia’s leading agency Analytical Credit Rating Agency from its establishment in November 2015 to July 2020.

Prior to that Thomas was Executive Director of Triple A Corporate and Rating Advisory, a 100% subsidiary of UniCredit Bank Austria in Vienna, acting as communication channel between the bank, the bank clients and the international rating agencies.

In the past he worked as a project manager in Bank Austria Creditanstalt in the Energy and Utilities team in Vienna and as project Manager for Lyonnaise des Eaux, the leading global water utility, in Paris.

Thomas Missong has a Master’s degree in European Political Affairs from the College of Europe in Bruges and holds a Magister in Business Administration from Wirtschaftsuniversitat in Vienna (with focus on Capital Markets).

Register here:

Featured

Touro TESOL Candidate Radhika Hira on Teaching According to the Stages of Literacy Development

Discussion Boards are invaluable for students to develop their analytic skills, reflect on their readings and interact with their peers. Here an outstanding DB by Touro TESOL Candidate Radhika Hira on Teaching According to the Stages of Literacy Development.

Radhika Hira, a preservice elementary school teacher and yoga teacher in New York will graduate with her MA in Dual Inclusive Elementary Education from Teachers College this fall, and is working on a TESOL extension from Touro as well.
Radhika states that “I’m kind of known for my positive attitude! I think it is my biggest strength in a classroom – it allows my students to have a growth mindset. Since they feel safe in making mistakes, it encourages risk taking as they learn to be learners. This is a tumultuous time in the world, and I am excited to be there for my students. They need us to be ‘present’ more than ever.”

This DB focuses on your reading of Teaching According to the Stages of Literacy Development

  1. How would YOU in YOUR professional teaching practice, track and assess reading levels ? Please be specific.

Over 60 years ago, Betts (1946) described a framework for levels dependent on difficulty in his book, Foundations of Reading Instruction: With Emphasis on Differentiated Guidance. This framework was based on research done over 70 years ago now, and with 41 children. The framework resulted in four levels of reading which are still applicable today. (1) the independent level, (2) the instructional level, (3) the frustration level and (4) the probable capacity level. The fourth level is based on material which is read to a student but the first three are based on the decoding and comprehending ability of the student when reading a text.

Today there are at least 7 systems that level children’s book based on this, and mathematical algorithms using word length and sentence length. (F&P, Lexile, Accelerated Reader, Reading Recover/Benchmark, DRA, DRP, & Fleish-Kincaid). I have personally used F&P running records and miscue analysis as tools to assess students reading levels. My experience leads me to see miscue analysis as a far more authentic tool to measure reading needs of students so that we can focus on improving proficiency as opposed to levels.

Educators, parents and administrators take levels seriously and while I agree that levels are an important and even elegant tool to create a framework for students in some respects, as an educator I primarily always keep in mind that they are a teacher’s tool and not a reader’s label. The following are the principles from Glasswell and Ford’s 2011 article, Let’s start Leveling about Leveling, that I plan to live by in my own professional practice:

• Leveling takes a complex idea and makes it too simple: Reading is a complex process. It involves the reader, the text, background information, culture, linguistic ability, preference and interest all in one. Boiling this down to a mathematical algorithm that assess the word length or number of words on a page in isolation makes levels simplistic and requires that a teacher weigh everything else in and employ professional judgement as well.

• Leveling takes a simple idea and makes it too complex: An example best illustrates this point. In the popular F&P system, “for level J texts, consideration is given to 10 key text characteristics (genre/forms, text structure, content, themes and ideas, language and literary features, sentence complexity, vocabulary, words, illustrations, and book and print features). Across those 10 characteristics, 66 specific criteria are further identified. In contrast, a K-level text is analyzed using the same ten characteristics with 71 specific criteria. J- and K-level texts share 21 identical criteria and many more criteria that vary only in degree. For example, sentence length in J books is 10+ words; in K books, it is 15+ words. Length ranges in J-level texts from 24–36 pages; K-level texts are 24–48 pages. In the end, a book like Henry and Mudge: The First Book is assigned to the J basket, while Frog and Toad Are Friends finds its way into the K basket.” (Glasswell, 2011,211) In addition to being inaccessible to teachers to replicate for a text that is not leveled, it is not clear if these decision are made based on empirical evidence or simply collective characteristics which are subjective. Additionally, research supporting these methods are not necessarily valid or reliable.

• Reading levels are not the same as reading needs: This might be the most critical principle to keep in mind when I implement reading levels. Readers within a level might differ drastically in their needs. Even if readers have the same number of miscues, self corrections and errors, the reasons behind these could be vastly different indicating a distinct skill that needs to be addressed for the reader.

• Progress does not equal proficiency: Readers progressing from one level to the next are not necessarily acquiring proficiency since the emphasis is more on the text and the level than the reader. Additionally this often creates competition & judgement in relation to reading which can create more aversion to reading for many.

• Readers have rights (as well as levels): This quote from the F&P blog really sums up the importance of ensuring levels are always kept in check and come after a reader’s right to read and consume knowledge as they desire.

“Fountas and Pinnell on Leveling: A Teacher’s Tool – Levels can be a resource for you and your colleagues to guide student choices for independent reading, but they should not be a limitation or a requirement. Leveled books are instructional tools for teachers who understand them—nothing more. Above all else, a level is a teacher’s tool, not a child’s label.” (F&P, 2016)

  1. Watching the webcast and looking at the Reading Rockets resources was there anything that you will be able to incorporate into your professional practice?

There were many moments in the webcast that resonated with me and reinforced ideas that I have about practice. Dr. Pressley stressed throughout the webcast how teachers need to consistently keep abreast of new developments and spend time deep diving into the resources they have, even if those are limited. This is important as an educator to keep in mind and always ensure we attend PDs, and keep abreast of what is happening in the field so we can make informed decisions for our students to support them.

Carol Ann Tomlinson talks about “The student leading the teacher.” (23.57) and I believe this is critical since we need to follow our student’s lead. This can only result in better motivation, engagement and a sense of enhanced learning for the classroom community. However, Tomlinson’s work has it’s foundations in gifted education and is not empirical but is based on the intersection of readiness, interest and the student’s learning profile so that content, process or product is modified. It is a responsive approach based on consistent observation of the student. While crucial to consistently assessing students, this approach also makes the teacher central in terms of creating modifications. It takes pre-set content and then tries to adapt it for different learners. This understanding makes me more convinced of the benefits of a UDL (Universal Design for Learning) instructional strategy more than ever. UDL is based in neuroscience and on the principles of the 8 multiple intelligences. While it has foundations and is connected to special education, it is a ‘lens to look through so we can remove barriers and center learners.’ It provides for multiple means of representation, action and expression as the three pillars of lessons and teaching to bring all students access to content in ways they learn best. It is a constructivist approach where in addition to readiness and interests, aspects of the whole student like family, culture, and community are also included. As Carol Ann Tomlinson says “as capturing their best ways of learning” (Tomlinson, 32.49) and “taking advantage of every skill opportunity”(Tomlinson, 9:58).

I believe a UDL approach as opposed to differentiation makes it less challenging for us as teachers because you don’t go into a lesson with set content that then needs to differentiated based on students. You approach the lesson and offer students different ways to access, learn and represent their learning right from the start. If your starting point is that, the process becomes far less intimidating and challenging. It is a resource that “gives you more flexibility rather than hamper it.” (Tomlinson, 41.00)

  1. List Challs stages of reading development aligned with age, 1 key teaching principles, and 1 key teaching practices for each stage.

‘0-6 Years

STAGE 0: By age 6, children can understand thousands of words they hear but can read/write few if any of them.

Principle: They should be exposed to rich experiential learning and shared reading so that they can develop a rich vocabulary. Practice: Their vocabulary and language is developing and are encouraged to draw and scribble. Games, play, word walls and verbal exchanges are instrumental. Purposeful writing is important.

6-7 years

At the end of STAGE 1, most children can understand up to 4000 or more words when heard but can read/write about 600.

Principle: Direct and systematic phonics instruction and Shared, guided and interactive reading and writing are a focus.

Practice: Vocabulary is still developing and in addition they can listen to and discuss stories and write recounts/retells of stories. Invented spelling is encouraged.

7-9 Years

At the end of STAGE 2, about 3000 words can be read, written and understood and about 9000 are known when heard. NB: children’s written language may be up to 3 years behind oral language.

Principle: Continued Phonics in conjunction with learning to express ideas and writing purposefully.

Practice: Exploring interesting though familiar, topics, collection data, word walls, guided reading.

9-13 years

At beginning of STAGE 3, listening comprehension of the same material is still more effective than comprehension and composition. By the end of Stage 3, literacy and listening are about equal for those who read very well.

Principle: Consolidation of constrained skills; speaking, listening and viewing for a range of purposes in diverse knowledge areas to focus on main idea and key strategies of evaluating and analyzing.

Practice: Literacy practice is replaced by reading and writing meaningfully for authentic purposes through complex activities like debates, and discussions.

  1. What did you learn for your own professional practice that was surprising after reading: Teaching According to the Stages of Literacy Development

While reading the article the one thing that stood out to me was the idea that inventive spelling should be encouraged in Stage 1. While I think I’ve instinctively seen this occur and I understood it, it was nice to see it as part of the stage of literacy development. It also makes perfect sense in combination with the idea that phonics are just about being introduced and the student’s understanding of phonemes and the sound letter connection is most important at this stage.

References:

Brace, E. (2017, April 10). Teaching According to the Stages of Literacy Development. Retrieved November 13, 2020, from https://www.theliteracybug.com/journal/2017/8/4/literacy-

teaching-in-accordance-with-the-stages-of-literacy-development?rq=Teaching+According+to+the+stages+of+literacy+development

Fountas&Pinnell. (2016, September 29). A Level is a Teacher’s Tool, NOT a Child’s Label. Retrieved November 18, 2020, from https://fpblog.fountasandpinnell.com/a-level-is-a-teacher-s-tool-not-a-child-s-label

Glasswell, K., & Ford, M. (2011). Let’s start Leveling ab

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Touro College TESOL candidate Eva Sipe’s SIOP lesson plan and presentation for EDDN 637

Context and Overview

The focus in the Touro TESOL course EDDN 637 Second Language Learners and the Content Areas is on practicing effective approaches, methods, and strategies for teaching and evaluating English language learners in the content areas (ELA, social studies, math and science). Teacher candidates are required to design a sheltered instruction lesson following the Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP) Model, a research-based and validated instructional model that has proven effective in addressing the academic needs of English learners throughout the United States.  Candidates need to explain how and why they’ve decided on the specific lesson content and language needs to be addressed.  Activities focus on assessing student needs before, during and upon lesson completion to enhance future instructional planning.  An outstanding SIOP lesson plan was submitted by Touro TESOL candidate Eva Sipe.

Eva Sipe, a 3rd Grade NYC Public School Teacher in Brooklyn, NY, has taught Special Education since 2005 and taught English Language Learners since 2016. She received her Undergraduate Diploma and Master’s Degrees in Comparative Religions and Philosophy at the Catholic University of Lublin in her native country, Poland. She received her Dual Master in General and Special Education from Touro College and her Advanced TESOL Certificate from Adelphi University. She is currently pursuing an Advanced Certificate in Bilingual Education at Touro College to better serve the bilingual population of students at her school.

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Rotary Club Of New York International UN event: Wolfram von Heynitz – Deputy Consul General of Germany in New York on December 16th, 2020 will speak on “The Future of Transatlantic Cooperation”

As Chair of the RCNY UN International meetings I am pleased to announce Wolfram von Heynitz – Deputy Consul General of Germany in New York will speak on “The Future of Transatlantic Cooperation” on Wednesday, December 16, 2020 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM EST. Please register at: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/wolfram-von-heynitz-deputy-consul-general-of-germany-in-new-york-tickets-131642370875

About Wolfram von Heynitz
Wolfram von Heynitz is currently the Deputy Consul General of Germany in New York.

Prior to this he was Head of the Cyber Policy Coordination Staff of the German Federal Foreign Office, a member of the Group of Governmental Experts on Advancing responsible State behavior in cyberspace convened in 2019 by UN Secretary-General Guterres and a member of the Ad hoc Committee on Artificial Intelligence of the Council of Europe. In this position, he was also responsible for the recently published “Recommendations for the Future of Digital cooperation” which Germany and the UAE undertook at the request of the UN.

Previous positions include a term as Research Commissioner of the German Federal Foreign Office and a member of its Policy Planning staff, specializing in Cyberpolicy, Cybersecurity, and, in the face of emerging challenges, the development of future directions and strategies for the Foreign Office. He has also served as Head of the Division for Foresight, in the Ministry’s EU Enlargement Division, as the Political Counsellor in the German Embassy in Tel Aviv dealing with the Middle East Peace Process and Israeli interior politics, in the private office of the Minister for European Affairs and in the Office of the Federal President of Germany. He was also posted as Deputy Head of Mission to Ireland and Azerbaijan.

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RCNY Virtual International Breakfast Meeting at the UN on November 18th, 2020 featuring Consul General of Italy Francesco Genuardi

As Chair of the RCNY Virtual International Breakfast meetings at the UN it is my pleasure to announce our guest speaker the Consul General of Italy Francesco Genuardi.

As Chair of the RCNY Virtual International Breakfast meetings at the UN it is my pleasure to announce our guest speaker the Consul General of Italy Francesco Genuardi.

Francesco Genuardi is an Italian diplomat with 23 years of experience in the field of International Relations. In March 2016 he has been appointed Consul General of Italy in New York, the most prominent consular position in the Italian diplomatic service, covering the States of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Bermuda with a resident Italian Population of about 90,000 and more than 3 million Italian-Americans.

From November 2014 and prior to his appointment to New York, he was at the Cabinet of the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Hon. Gentiloni, dealing with parliamentary relations. Between 2005 and 2014 he served at the Cabinet of the Foreign Minister, working with the succeeding Ministers in office. From 2002 to 2005 he was appointed Counselor at the Permanent Mission of Italy to NATO, where he was responsible, among other issues, for the relationship with the Press in Brussels and with the NATO Parliamentary Assembly.

From 1998 to 2002 he served as Deputy Consul at the Consulate General in Buenos Aires, Argentina. He joined the diplomatic service in 1993, and between 1993 and 1998 he was at the General Directorate for Economic Affairs – where he dealt with international issues associated with environmental protection and safety – and at the Press and Media Office.

Born in Brussels on July 7, 1967, he graduated in Law at the University of Milan in 1991. He is married and has two daughters.

http://REGISTER AT: https://bit.ly/RCNYItalybkfst

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Touro TESOL Candidate Alessia Tartamella on Program Options and Teaching Models for English Language Learners/Multilingual Learners

Online Discussion boards ensure that course questions and answers are available to all participants, create a repository of shared information and create a permanent record of all postings. Yet, apart from these points, Online Discussion Boards throughout the semester showcase students in-depth analysis of the assigned materials and their scholarly trajectory. This week I am featuring Touro College, TESOL candidate Alessia Tartamella’s excellent contribution.

Alessia Tartamella, a 3rd Grade NYC Public School teacher in Brooklyn, New York, has taught English Language Learners since 2016. She received her Bachelors Degree of Business Administration at Brooklyn College and her Masters Degree in Teaching Children grades 1-6 at Brooklyn College. Currently, she attends Touro College to pursue an extension in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages. This will be her last semester at Touro College. “I hope to soon move on to become a certified TESOL teacher in the NYC Public School system.”

  1. In NYS,  what are the  Program Options for English Language Learners/Multilingual Learners?

The Program Options for English Language Learners and Multilingual Learners are Transitional Bilingual Education Program (TBE) , Dual Language (DL) , One Way Dual Language Program, Two Way Dual Language Program and English as a New Language (ENL). (Program Options for English Language Learners/Multilingual Learners, n.d.)

2. Name the five different models currently in use that integrate language and content instruction – refer to Celce-Murcia Unit III readings.

There are different models that teachers may use when lesson planning. According to Celce-Mucia in Unit III, these models were created by experts with different views and embedded theories. The first model is the Hunter model (Hunter, 2004). This model is also known as five-step, seven-step, or nine-step model. Another model is the presentation-practice-production model (PPP). This is used mainly in beginning-level classes of language learning.  The next model is the engage-study-activate (ESA) model. This is a more versatile model than the PPP model because it allows the instructor to adapt the lesson delivery in different ways. This can be taught in different time frames and with students’ engagement in mind.  Another teaching model is the Sheltered Immersion Observation Protocol or SIOP model. This is a model developed with the intention of teaching students learning English from grades K-12th grade.  With this model, the instructor’s intention is to teach language and content at the same time. This model first started as a rubric for teacher’s observations, and evolved into a lesson-planning model.  Finally, the last teaching model is encounter, clarify, remember, internalize, and fluently use (ECRIF). This is a common model used when teachers drill strategies or vocabulary to students. 

3. Name the model that you use most and why.

In my instruction, I mainly use the Sheltered Immersion Observation Protocol or SIOP model. It is very important for students to learn content while learning a new language. In my school, teachers are expected to teach a lot of content to students, even if they do not speak English yet. We are considered a content based school.  This method of teaching English could be challenging for a teacher because it incorporates many things into a lesson, however, for a student who is learning English it allows them to use what they know in their lives and apply it to what they are learning.  This model also allows the teacher to focus on language objectives to get students to the goal or goals of the lesson. Students and teachers can activate prior knowledge, teach vocabulary and apply the lesson to real world situations to motivate students.  Then, students go on and participate in language objectives, strategies and interactions. Finally, students will practice and apply.  This model is what I am required to use in my classroom and one that I enjoy using as a third grade TESOL teacher.

In addition to this model, my school uses the ECRIF model when teaching phonics and reading to students learning how to read. We use a program called Orton-Gillingham, where students participate in language drills that they apply to reading a writing.  This strategy works well for many special education students and some ELLs, but not all. Students are taught the rules of English grammar and spelling.  After they are taught the basic rules through drills and repetition, they use them in practice for reading and writing.

4. Gather some information on student assessment from your school district. What kinds of student assessments are regularly administered, and in what language? If the district includes non-native speakers of English, are testing and assessment requirements modified or altered in any way to accommodate them? If so, how?

There are different assessments given to students in different situations.  During a student’s registration process, they are assessed through an interview and questions to determine the child’s ability in English and if the child may need special education services. This interview process is done by a trained teacher, sometimes a TESOL one and the school psychologist, if necessary. 

For learning, my school district uses different forms of assessments, but they are not altered to accommodate non-native speakers of English.  In the beginning of the year, students are given reading, writing, and math assessments. All students take the same assessment and they are all given without the teacher reading the questions to them.  However, my school district uses an online program called iReady that is tailored to all student’s needs. While the student takes the assessment, the online program adapts itself to the child’s ability.  It alters questions in different subject domains and only asks the just-right amount of questions for a child.  When the student continuously does not know answers to questions, the assessment ends. If a student continuously gets questions correct, the assessment continues on, adding difficulty to the assessment. This is a good way to get accurate ability levels in all students and does not allow them to feel discouraged. This assessment also reads to students, includes videos and engaging characters to keep students interested and excited. 

5. What is the purpose of Commissioner’s Regulations – Sections 117 http://www.p12.nysed.gov/sss/lawsregs/117-1-3.html (Links to an external site.)

The purpose of the Commissioners Regulations Sections 117 is that students must be given a screening prior to entering a school to develop a plan for learning for each child.  The students should be given this assessment to ensure they are placed in the correct learning setting. This is to ensure students with special needs are given a fair placement.  Additionally, speakers of other languages should be given a choice of a placement in a Dual language class, or ENL class when registering, if the school has the option. 

6. How do the BLUEPRINT FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNER/MULTILINGUAL LEARNER (ELL/MLL) SUCCESS http://www.nysed.gov/common/nysed/files/nys-blueprint-for-ell-success.pdf (Links to an external site.) and CR Part 154 Comprehensive ELL Education Plan (CEEP) and ENL staffing requirements connect with each other? http://www.nysed.gov/bilingual-ed/cr-part-154-comprehensive-ell-education-plan-ceep?   (Links to an external site.)http://www.nysed.gov/common/nysed/files/programs/bilingual-ed/enl-k-8-units-of-study-table-5-6-15.pdf (Links to an external site.)

These three resources have many things in common, but the most common theme is the plan for fair instruction for English Language Learners.  These three resources highlight the importance of a structured program for the diverse levels of English Language Learners.  They all enforce inclusivity and structure.  The Blueprint for English Language Learners/MLL success highlights 8 different aspects to teaching English at the highest regard.  The mission of this blueprint is described as “The mission of the New York State Education Department’s (NYSED) Office of Bilingual Education and World Languages (OBEWL) is to ensure that all New York State (NYS) students, including English Language Learners/ Multilingual Learners (ELLs/MLLs), attain the highest level of academic success and language proficiency. ” (The Blueprint for English Language Learners/MLL success, n.d.).  

The Commissioner’s Regulations 154 states that all English Language Learners must experience learning as described in the education plan for ELLs. Principals and staff must submit a plan of action for these students.  By using the ENL staffing requirements, principals can align staffing and instruction to fit the needs of the students in the school. These three resources go hand in hand because they demonstrate the appropriate planning and instruction required for a school to fairly and legally education ELL students. 

7. List 3 surprising fact you learned about in Celce-Murcia Chapter 32: Approaches to School-Based Bilingual Education Mary McGroarty & Shannon Fitzsimmons-

  • “Bilingual education is not only for recent immigrants; there are also approaches aimed at monolingual students who speak only the majority language and wish to develop strong proficiency in another language” (Celce-Murcia, 503)
  • “In the United States, there is a great deal of interest in two-way immersion model designed to serve both language minority and language majority children who wish to learn through the medium of two languages and develop literacy skills in both languages. ” (Celce-Murcia, 506)
  • Although teachers are vital, they are not the only relevant personnel. The presence of school administrators who understand bilingual instruction, other bilingual instructional personnel such as classroom aides and librarians, and bilingual staff members such as shcool secretary increase the likelihood of consistent and effective bilingual instruction.

Citations

Blueprint for English Language Learner/ Multilingual Learner Success THE STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT / THE UNIVERS ITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK Office of Bilingual Education and World L anguages. (n.d.). http://www.nysed.gov/common/nysed/files/nys-blueprint-for-ell-success.pdf (Links to an external site.)

Celce-Murcia, M., Brinton, D., & Snow, M. A. (2014). Teaching English as a second or foreign language. Boston: National Geographic Learning

CR Part 154 Comprehensive ELL Education Plan (CEEP). (n.d.). New York State Education Department. Retrieved September 28, 2020, from http://www.nysed.gov/bilingual-ed/cr-part-154-comprehensive-ell-education-plan-ceep?

CR Part 154-2 (K-8) English as New Language (ENL) Units of Study and Staffing Requirements. (n.d.). Retrieved September 28, 2020, from http://www.nysed.gov/common/nysed/files/programs/bilingual-ed/enl-k-8-units-of-study-table-5-6-15.pdf

Program Options for ELLs/MLLs. (n.d.). New York State Education Department. Retrieved September 28, 2020, from http://www.nysed.gov/bilingual-ed/program-options-english-language-learnersmultilingual-learners

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The Honorable Adrian Kubicki, Consul General of Poland in New York City and Rotary Club of New York International Breakfast at the UN – Virtual

The Honorable Adrian Kubicki, Consul General of Poland in New York City and Rotary Club of New York International Breakfast at the UN – Virtual

As Chair of the Rotary Club of New York’s International Breakfast at the United Nations it is my pleasure to announce our next guest speaker: Adrian Kubicki Consul General of Poland in New York City. Join us virtually by registration https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rotary-club-of-new-york-international-breakfast-at-the-un-virtual-tickets-123754317495

DATE
Wed, Oct 21, 2020 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM EDT

Born in 1987 in Poland, Adrian Kubicki is a Diplomat, sociologist, expert in public relations and communication, former journalist and spokesperson of LOT Polish Airlines.

He graduated social sciences at University of Warsaw. For 7 years he worked as a journalist for one of the largest radio stations in Poland, reporting major news stories from Poland and many other countries across the globe. He contributed to major daily newspapers in Poland as well as the website dedicated to nongovernment organizations with a particular focus on humanitarian and development aid.

In 2014 he joined communications team at LOT Polish Airlines as international PR manager, building relations with media on airline’s key markets, including the U.S. In 2016 he became spokesperson and executive director responsible for building communication strategy for the ambitious plan of LOT’s global expansion. During that time he and his team organized more than 100 events and press conferences, launching new services to Tokyo, Seoul, Singapore, Newark, Los Angeles, Miami and many others, as well as introducing new Boeing aircraft to the service – 787 Dreamliner and 737 MAX. He represented LOT on many of these events, as well as at major international conferences and gatherings around the World.

In 2017, together with LOT’s CEO Rafał Milczarski, he initiated and run a successful public campaign educating Polish passport holders about U.S. visa application process, with an aim to reduce the refusal rate below 3%. Campaign guided Poland to being included into the Visa Waiver Program in 2019.

In August 2019 he joined Polish foreign service at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, where he received a consular title and was appointed for four years term as a director of Polish Cultural Institute in New York – part of Polish diplomatic mission to the U.S. working in the field of public diplomacy.

In January 2020 he has received an official nomination to become a new Consul General of Poland in New York. In February 2020 he passed the hearing before the parliament commission, receiving green light to take over the post later this year.

Privately he is married to Anna and is a father of two years old daughter Laura. In his spare time he enjoys playing piano and organs.

JOIN VIA ZOM: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83896620862

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Hon. Consul General of the Republic of Kazakhstan in New York, Mr. Almat Aidarbekov joins the Rotary Club of New York International Breakfast Meeting at the UN – Virtual

About this Event

Mr. Almat Aidarbekov started his career at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Kazakhstan in 1998 as a desk officer at the Asia, Middle East and Africa Division of the Fourth Department.

In 1999-2000, he held position of Attaché at the Department for Bilateral Cooperation. In 2000, he was posted as Attaché at the Embassy of the Republic of Kazakhstan in the Republic of Turkey.

In March, 2003 he returned to the Foreign Ministry and held consecutive positions of Second and First Secretary at the Department of Europe and the Americas.

From 2004 to 2007, Mr. Aidarbekov was posted as Head of Consular Section at the Embassy of Kazakhstan to the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

In 2007-2014, he served as Second, Third Secretary and later as Counselor of the Embassy of Kazakhstan in the United States.

In 2014-2019, he held several high ranking positions at the Foreign Policy Division of the Presidential Administration of Kazakhstan.

Mr. Aidarbekov has served as Consul General of the Republic of Kazakhstan in New York since November 1, 2019.

He has a Master’s degree in Public Management from Carnegie Mellon University and undergraduate degree in International Relations from Ankara University.

He speaks English, Russian and Turkish, and holds the diplomatic rank of Counselor of First Class.

Almat Aidarbekov is married with three children.

Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rotary-club-of-new-york-international-breakfast-at-the-un-virtual-tickets-118974793811

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NYS TESOL Journal published Dr. Cowin’s “Simulation-Based Learning Environment: A Training Tool for TESOL Teacher Candidates”

simSchool screenshot of virtual classroom

simSchool: screenshot of virtual classroom environment training module.

I am pleased to announce the publication of my Materials Review:

Cowin, J. B. (2020). simSchool’s Simulation-Based Learning Environment: A Training Tool for TESOL Teacher Candidates. NYS TESOL Journal, 7(2), 44-46. Retrieved 2020, from http://journal.nystesol.org/currentissue.html

Many thanks to the helpful direction of the Editor-in-Chief Lubie Grujicic-Alatriste, New York City, College of Technology, City University of New York.

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Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice Publication: Access and Equity: Computers for Schools Burundi by Dr. Jasmin Bey Cowin

Keywords: Higher Education, Practice, education, information and communication technology (ICT), access, equity, computers for schools Burundi, African

It is my pleasure to announce the publication of my article in the Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice:
Cowin, J. B. (2020). Access and Equity: Computers for Schools Burundi. Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice20(3). https://doi.org/10.33423/jhetp.v20i3.2970

Keywords: Higher Education, Practice, education, information and communication technology (ICT), access, equity, computers for schools Burundi, African

Abstract

Although information and communication technology (ICT) has been used in various parts of the world to improve access to and the quality of education, educational systems in many African nations still face challenges around access to, equity in, and accessibility of ICT. Such issues are widespread in public education throughout Burundi. To resolve these issues, all stakeholders, including nongovernmental organizations, not-for-profit organizations, schools, communities, and employers in the education sector, must recognize and facilitate educational liberation leading to the social transformation of Burundi’s educational system. It is especially important to include previously disadvantaged communities. This paper outlines and contextualizes the quest of Computers for Schools Burundi to improve access to and equity in ICT literacy skills for Burundian youth from kindergarten–Grade 12.

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Dr. Jasmin Bey Cowin Presents “Tips and Resources on Teaching Math Online to English Learners”, a NYS TESOL Webinar

NYS TESOL Webinars

All are welcome to participate in our webinars! 

  • All webinars are listed in Eastern time (NYC time zone)
  • Pre-registration is required, no later than 1 hour prior to the start of the session. 
  • 30 minutes before the session begins, you will receive an email with a join link.  Please do not share this link on any social media platforms to preserve the integrity of the sessions. 
  • Members will be prioritized when the session reaches capacity
  • Only members can apply for CTLE. Follow this link to apply for CTLE.  Join now for these benefits!
  • To register for any upcoming webinars, click here: https://bit.ly/nystesolwebinar.

Dr. Jasmin Bey Cowin presents “Tips and Resources on Teaching Math Online to English Learners” on 8/20/2020 at 2 pm

Explore different online tools such as Desmos Activities .

Key Math vocabulary for ELLs in Preproduction, Early Production, Speech Emergence, (Krashen & Terrell, 1983).
• Number words, including cardinal (three) and ordinal (third) form
• Words related to basic mathematical operations:
• Addition, add, sum, plus
• Subtraction, subtract, difference, minus
• Multiplication, multiply, product, times
• Division, divide, quotient
• Equals

Featured

The Virtual NYS TESOL 50th Annual Conference Schedule featuring Diane Larsen-Freeman, Ofelia García, Stephen Krashen

The New York State Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages is delighted to announce its speaker schedule for The Virtual NYS TESOL 50th Annual Conference.

The dates: 11/13/2020 – 11/14/2020 from 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM.

The Virtual NYS TESOL 50th Annual Conference will be inclusive of all our members across New York State and around the world! 

We have intentionally designed a compassionate virtual conference – a place to connect, learn and above all share how much we care about our multilingual learners, their families, and each other. 

The two days will be filled with rich opportunities to learn, share, and interact with educators of multilingual learners at all levels. Conference activities include three types of concurrent sessions: 45-minute interactive workshops, 25-minute practice or research-focused presentations, quick 15-minute teaching tips as well as fun coffee breaks and lunches with incredible keynote speakers.

Registration & Fees
The conference fee includes the full two days of conference activities, access to recordings of all sessions, and NYS TESOL membership through 2021.
2020 Member $75
Click here to register

If you would like to make a donation to support NYS TESOL in honor of our 50th anniversary, click here!

Schedule at a Glance

Friday, November 13, 2020

9:00-9:10Opening Remarks by NYS TESOL President Laura Baecher
9:15-9:45Plenary 1: Okhee Lee
10:00-10:45 Concurrent Sessions
11:00-11:30 Coffee Klatsch with TESOL Great Diane Larsen-Freeman
11:45-12:15Plenary 2: Ofelia García
12:30-1:15TESOL Expert Brown-Bag Conversation with Luciana de Oliveira
1:30-2:30 Hands-on Workshops

More than Scaffolding Reading: Validating, Affirming, Honoring ELs Valentina Gonzalez
Teaching Immigration Through Film: A Workshop for Secondary Educators Tatyana Kleyn
Culturally Sustaining-Responsive Instructional Reading Approaches for Emergent Adolescent Readers Jody Polleck
Migrant Students and Trauma – Part 1 Michael O’Loughlin and Susanne Marcus
The Altruistic Shield: Moving Past Racial Discomfort and White Fragility Justin Gerald
Standing up for Our Community: an Upstander Workshop for Teachers Sarah Creider
Virtual Study Abroad Collaboration Devin Thornburg and Óscar Ceballos
2:45-3:15Afternoon Tea with TESOL expert Diane Staehr Fenner
3:30-4:00Plenary 3:  Deborah Short
4:15-5:00Award Ceremony Celebrate Students and Educators

Saturday, November 14, 2020

9:00-9:10Opening Remarks by NYS TESOL President Laura Baecher
9:15-9:45Plenary 1: Elisa Alvarez
10:00-10:45 Concurrent Sessions
11:00-11:30Coffee Klatsch with TESOL great Stephen Krashen 
11:45-12:15Plenary 2: Alicja Winnicki and Elsa Nuñes
12:30-1:15TESOL Expert Brown-Bag Conversation with Emily Francis
1:30-2:30 Hands-on Workshops Migrant Students and Trauma – Part 2 Michael O’Loughlin and Susanne Marcus
Advancing the Language & Literacy Needs of Adolescent Newcomers Rebecca Curinga and Ingrid Heidrick
The Synchronous Online Flipped Learning Approach – An 8-Step Cycle Helaine Marshall
Engaging All Students in Learning Science Through Functional Use of Language Emily Kang and Okhee Lee
Creating Breakout Rooms with Google Meet to Encourage Live Collaboration Tan Huynh
Addressing Perceptions and Stereotypes in Interracial Friendships and Teacher-Student Relationships within Diverse School Communities Ming-Hsuan Wu and Sonna Opstad
Determining Language Difference from Disability Jamie Scripps
Taller de Bitmoji Esther Park and Suzy Cáceres

Deepen Learning with PBL Virtual Field Trips Frederic Lim
Culturally-Responsive and Sustaining Practices Odette Clarke and Max Chang
Texts, Topic, Translanguaging: A Framework for Teaching Bilingual/ Multilingual Students Carla España and Luz Yadira Herrera
2:45-3:15NYS TESOL SIGs/ Regions Tea and Conversation
3:30-4:00Plenary 3: Andrea Honigsfeld and Maria Dove
4:15-5:00Toast the 50th!Honor 50 Past Presidents and Installation of New Board
Featured

The Rotary Club of New York United Nations International Breakfast Meetings present: Ambassador Otgonbayar Yondon – Ambassador of the Mongolian Republic

The Rotary Club of New York United Nations International Breakfast Meetings present: Ambassador Otgonbayar Yondon – Ambassador of the Mongolian Republic

As Chair of the RCNY International Breakfast Meetings it is my pleasure to announce our guest for our next Zoom meeting: Ambassador Otgonbayar Yondon – Ambassador of the Mongolian Republic

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rcny-international-breakfast-tickets-117026711043 Please register on Eventbrite for Wed, August 19, 20209:00 AM – 10:00 AM EDT

Yondon Otgonbayar, a long-time member of his country’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs, presented his credentials to President Donald Trump as Mongolia’s ambassador to the United States on March 28, 2018. He had nominated to the position on May 25, 2017.

Otgonbayar was born August 3, 1965. He attended School #52 in Ulaanbaator, Mongolia’s capital, before serving a hitch in the army as a member of the 282nd Infantry Regiment. In 1983, he left for the Moscow Institute of Foreign Relations, finishing in 1989. He returned to that school later, in 2005, and added a Ph.D. He also earned a post-graduate diploma at the School of Marketing and Management in New Delhi, India, in 1995.

Otgonbayar joined Mongolia’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs in 1989 as first secretary in the Department of Asia. In 1991, he was sent to India as second secretary in the embassy in New Delhi. Otgonbayar was then put in the Department of International Organizations and served in 1996-1997 in Mongolia’s mission to the United Nations.

In 1997, Otgonbayar left government to be the CEO and director of Bayangol Hotel. He returned to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in 2000 as first secretary in the Department of Policy Planning and the following year was made foreign policy adviser to Prime Minister Nambaryn Enkhbayar.

Otgonbayar left the Foreign Ministry in 2004 to become secretary general of the Mongolian People’s Revolutionary Party (MPRP), now the Mongolian People’s Party. At the time, Mongolia was doing a lot of trading with China after years of being a client state of the Soviet Union. Otgonbayar worked to encourage trade with the United States, Japan, South Korea and the European Union as well. In 2006, Otgonbayar added leadership of the Ulaanbaator branch of the MPRP to his party duties.

Otgonbayar was made minister of education, culture and science in 2008. He was elected to parliament in 2012 from Bulgan, a province along the border with Russia. In 2016, Otgonbayar was named vice minister of education, culture, science and sports, a post he held until going to Washington.

Otgonbayar is married and has two children. He speaks English, Russian and Hindi. (Steve Straehley)

Featured

Prof. Jasmin Cowin at the 2020 NAFSA eConnection On-Demand Content Area!

The 2020 NAFSA eConnection On-Demand Content Area eConnection attendees had a unique opportunity to view virtual sessions and posters, and listen to audio presentations at their own pace throughout July.

eConnection attendees had a unique opportunity to view virtual sessions and posters, and listen to audio presentations at their own pace throughout July. The poster fair launched on Day 2 of eConnection (May 27, 2020), our Learning day. The sessions launched on Day 5 of eConnection (June 17, 2020), our Looking Into the Future.

Featured

Touro College TESOL Candidate Evelyn Ramos’ Materials Critique

Touro TESOL candidate Evelyn Ramos earned a dual bachelor’s degree in Adolescence Education Spanish (7-12) and Spanish Language, Hispanic Literature and Culture. She graduated in 2016 with Cum Laude honors. Her teaching career started 3 years ago in 2017 at Brentwood Union Free School district as a bilingual language teacher. She currently teaches Home Language Arts to 7th & 8th graders at East Middle school. “I choose to return back to Brentwood to give back to the community that gave so much to me. I started my graduate degree in 2017 and will graduate on June 16th, 2020 with a master’s degree in TESOL. I have accomplished all this being a mother to two beautiful girls, a wife, daughter, sister, and granddaughter.”

Touro TESOL candidate Evelyn Ramos earned a dual bachelor’s degree in Adolescence Education Spanish (7-12) and Spanish Language, Hispanic Literature and Culture. She graduated in 2016 with Cum Laude honors. Her teaching career started 3 years ago in 2017 at Brentwood Union Free School district as a bilingual language teacher. She currently teaches Home Language Arts to 7th & 8th graders at East Middle school. “I choose to return back to Brentwood to give back to the community that gave so much to me. I started my graduate degree in 2017 and will graduate on June 16th, 2020 with a master’s degree in TESOL. I have accomplished all this being a mother to two beautiful girls, a wife, daughter, sister, and granddaughter.”

Materials Critique Assignment

Evaluation and Selection

Choose 3 chapters/sections OR 3 books (either from a textbook series, library, or a set of supplemental texts to review). Prepare a written description minimum 2 pages per chapter/book/resource and critique of the material or resource, analyzing its effectiveness for ELL students.

You will need to answer to each

  • Level of content familiarity or background knowledge
  • Level of language
  • Level of textual support
  • Level of cultural fit
  • Redesign one section/activity of the original material so that it meets the need of ELLs.

Level of content familiarity or background knowledge

How close a fit is the text to the English learner’s content knowledge or background experiences?

  • What content and concepts are presented in the text? What is the content/conceptual load of the text? Basic and familiar? New but general? New and specialized?
  • Is this presentation an introduction to the content and concepts or is it continued conceptual development at a higher level?
  • What is the English learner’s level of content familiarity or background knowledge related to the content and concepts? Is the concept very familiar, familiar, unfamiliar, or not common?

Submission: Student Background

For this material critique, I observed three different teachers. I choose one book from the 6th-grade entering class, one book from the 7th grade emerging/transitioning course, and one both from the 8th grade emerging/transitioning class. The 8th-grade class is made up of five students. All students are in the 8th grade and are Spanish speaking students who are from Honduras, Ecuador, and El Salvador. The six students are classified as English language learners. They are classified at the emerging, transitioning, and expanding performance level; three students are transitioning, two students are emerging, and one student is expanding. Students a heterogeneously grouped by their language proficiency in the target language and academic knowledge in their home language. All of them have been in-country and in a U.S. school setting for less than 3 to 4 years. They have developed literacy skills in both their native and English language. However, all six students feel more comfortable in their native language than English. An exceptionality in the class is that the expanding student was in an integrated ELA class. Still, the ELA/ENL teacher recommends that the student be placed back into a stand-alone ENL/ELA class due to her language proficiency. Class is made up of 6 students in a stand-alone ENL/ELA setting. In this setting, there is one teacher dual certified in ELA & ENL. All instructions take place within the classroom during a block of two periods (45 minutes each). Students sit in tables of 2 or 3 and work in pairs. The co-operating teacher uses peer editing, pair-work, turn & talk, visual aids, and gallery walk to help students comprehend the target language. 

The 6th-grade class is made up of twelve students. All students are in the 6th grade and are Spanish speaking students who are from Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador. The twelve students are classified as English language learners. They are classified at the entering performance level. Students are heterogeneously grouped by their language proficiency in their target language and academic knowledge in the home language. All of them have been in-country and in a U.S. school setting for less than one year. Students can speak and read well in their native language. However, their writing skills are weak in their native language. Class is made up of 12 students in a stand-alone ENL/ELA setting. In this setting, there is one teacher dual certified in ELA & ENL. All instructions take place within the classroom during one period (45 minutes). Students sit in tables of 5 or 6 and work in pairs. Students feel more comfortable using the native language, and the co-operating teacher uses cognates, visual aids, and TPS to help the students understand the target language. 

The 7th-grade class is made up of sixteen students. All students are in the 7th grade and are Spanish speaking students, who are from Honduras, Guatemala, Dominican Republic, and El Salvador. The fifteen students are classified as English language learners. They are classified at the emerging and transitioning performance level; 10 students are transitioning, and six students are emerging. Students are heterogeneously grouped by their language proficiency in their target language and academic knowledge in the home language. All of them have been in-country and in a U.S. school setting for 1-3 years. Students can speak and read well in their native language. However, their writing skills are weak in their native language. Class is made up of 16 students in a stand-alone ENL/ELA setting. In this setting, there is one teacher dual certified in ELA & ENL. All instructions take place within the classroom during a block of two periods (45 minutes each). Students sit in groups of 3 to 5 and work in pairs. Students feel more comfortable using the native language, and the co-operating teacher uses cognates, visual aids, and TPS to help the students understand the target language. 

Students are in a Bilingual/ENL program. The school is part of the Brentwood School District- East Middle School on Long Island, 6th, 7th, and 8th grade ELA/ENL classes. The school is located in a suburban community in which the majority of the community members are Hispanic and from different Latin American countries.       

Escaping to Freedom by Daniel Schulman- 8th grade

The first text I choose to talk about for this assignment is the biography “Escaping Freedom” by Daniel Schulman. This text is a narrated biography on Josiah Henson, a runaway slave escaping to freedom. The biography narratives how Josiah left the plantation with his family in search of freedom. If he did not do so, he would have been sold away and separated from his family. The text describes how the family traveled to the “promised land” and became free. The biography shows cause and effect through the text and repeats the academic vocabulary numerous times. In addition, the biography illustrates how the slaves had to use the underground railroad and left their homes with nothing but a small bag. The biography is accompanied by many pictures and illiterates that allow the students to comprehended what they are reading.

Seeking freedom and escaping freedom is a topic that not only English language learners can relate to but also students who are native speakers of English. English language learners can also relate to their personal/family experiences. Previously, the students have learned how freedom is a privilege that many people fought for throughout history. They have been exposed to the academic vocabulary and the short story “Escaping Freedom.” The gallery walk will help students visualize what many people had to go through during the time of slavery in this country. Students will go on a gallery walk around the classroom and view pictures related to the story “Escaping Freedom” and slavery. Students will answer questions about the photos.

The unit on freedom will involve teaching students about freedom, who the important historical figures of seeking freedom are, and how freedom affects our everyday lives. Several students in this class can relate to the political issues that arise in today’s society. This unit will benefit students in the future because they can apply this knowledge to real-life situations. They will learn that discrimination continues to occur in today’s societies. Students need to realize the level of freedom in different areas of the world. Additionally, this unit benefits English language learners, as it helps them learn content-specific vocabulary that they will utilize in their everyday lives. Furthermore, our English language learners will thrive from this unit on freedom because, at the end of the unit, the students will celebrate their work by presenting their essay or PowerPoint on a historical individual who fought for civil rights. Each student or pair of students will share their projects with their peers.

           The students have previous knowledge of different historical people or figures in their own country who have fought for freedom. As well as background knowledge from their social studies class on slavery and the search to escape to freedom. Front-loading essential vocabulary: before the lesson student has been practicing the vocabulary. They created post-it note vocabulary using each word. They have the post-it notes in their interactive notebook. Key Words: Assist, Capture, Escape, Freedom, Reward, Right, Slave, and travel. On another day, students had a class discussion and used accountable talk to discuss freedom and rights using the academic vocabulary. Students used the vocabulary to express and answer questions regarding their experience with freedom and rights. Reading “Escaping to Freedom.” The class has read “Escaping to Freedom” and also listened to the story. On a separate day, students have a class discussion about the cause and effect that the story provided about the main character. The teacher also went over how the key vocabulary was used in context with the story. Students will have a class discussion about what life was like during that period in history, for example, plantation life and home life. They used the 3 new things I discovered, 2 interesting facts I learned, 1 question I still have… model to discuss the lifestyle during that period. The students will then complete a gallery walk on the story to further understand as to why people escaped to freedom during the slavery era. The gallery walk will help students visualize what many people had to go through during the time of slavery in this country. Students will go on a gallery walk around the classroom and view pictures related to the story “Escaping to Freedom” and slavery. Students will answer questions related to the picture and story. The gallery walk integrates all language skills. Students will have to listen to their peers’ ideas regarding the picture, share their opinion by stating it to their peers using the target and L1 language. Also, students will have to read each prompt/question and write down their answers on the worksheet. Accountable talk sentence frames have been provided to help students communicate in the target language and support in the native language. Students had access to their interactive notebook with reference to the key vocabulary. Students have prior experience using stations and gallery walks in their class. Students have expressed interest in working in groups and learning through gallery walks.  

Students are grouped in cooperative learning groups because they can work together and help each other. 

The students are grouped primarily by their target language proficiency level involving comprehension as well as their academic knowledge in their native language. Students will also have a do now, which consists of a quick write called Collins Writing. Collins writing is used across the curriculum. This type of writing allows the learner to understand and remember the content being introduced to them. 

NYS ELA Standards:

Reading Standards for Informational text 

RI. 6.2 Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.

RI. 6.5 Analyze how a particular sentence, paragraph, chapter, or section fits into the overall structure of a text and contributes to the development of ideas. 

Writing Standards

W. 6.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. 

W. 6.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (times for research, reflection, and revision) and short time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Speaking and Listening Standards

SL. 6.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 6 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

SL. 6.2 Interpret information presented in diverse media and formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) and explain how it contributes to a topic, text, or issue under study. 

Language Standards 

L. 6.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. 

L. 6.6 Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases; gather vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. 

Applicable NYS ELL Standards: 

Standard 1 – Social and Instructional Language 

 English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting. 

Standard 2 – Language of Language Arts 

English language learners communicate information, ideas, and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of language arts. 

Standard 5 – Language of Social Studies 

 English language learners communicate information, ideas, and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of social studies. 

Objectives:

Content Objective: Students will be able to discover the risks people took to free themselves and to help others gain freedom.

Language Objective: Students will be able to respond to and interpret visuals on escaping to freedom using academic vocabulary.

Key Vocabulary:

  • Assist
  • Capture
  • Escape
  • Freedom
  • Reward
  • Right
  • Slave 
  • Travel

Lesson format for : Escaping to Freedom by Daniel Schulman:

Essential Question:What risks did salves take to escape slavery?
Focus Question:How did slaves escape to gain freedom?
Academic LanguageStudents will use the key vocabulary to discuss why and how slaves escaped to freedom.
Guided Questions/Prompts:Write down as many words as you can to describe this picture.What do you notice about the traveling family?What did enslaved people and those who helped them risk by using the underground railroad?What would you do if you came across a runaway slave like Harriet Tubman? Use academic vocabulary: assist, freedom, slave, capture
Task:Warm Up –The class will complete the Do Now- Type 1 Collins Writing- Look at the wagon and objects (Cotton and Crops) on the table.  In three lines describe what you see.  The we will share out the responses. Class discussion (Teacher led)– We will go over the do now and discuss the ideas that the students came up on with the during the quick write.  The wagon and crops will be used to active prior knowledge on plantation life.Word presentation on the Aquos Interactive Board will review the agenda for the day and the step by step instructions for the gallery walk.   Think-a-loud will be used also to model how to think through the process. Teacher will also model how to use the accountable talk sheet.  Teacher will tell the students to reference their interactive notebook for the key vocabulary words.Students will go on a gallery walk around the classroom and view pictures related to the story “Escaping to Freedom” and slavery. Students will answer questions related to the picture and/or story. The gallery walk integrates all language skills.  Students will have to listen to their peers’ ideas regarding the picture, share their idea by stating it to their peer using the target and L1 language. In addition, students will have to read each prompt/question and write down their answers on the worksheet. After students will work in groups to share their ideas and explanation of each prompt/image.  Students will have the opportunity to learn and teach each other the how to respond the question and interpret the image.  In their group’s students will share their response, review and reflect on each other’s answers. Groups –  Students are heterogeneously grouped by their language proficiency in their target language and academic knowledge in the home language.   Students are grouped in cooperative learning groups, because they are able to work together and help each other.  The group will primarily be working on a think-pair-share assignment. Closure – Will review and have a class discussion on the gallery walk.  Students will share their answers and ideas with the class.  We will end the class reflecting on what we learned today and throughout the week on the topic escaping to freedom.I will close the lesson by handing out the exit slip and explaining the homework.  Students will have to complete the selection review worksheet- page 185 from their practice workbook.  

Bloom’s Knowledge Matrix:

The Knowledge DimensionRememberUnder-standApplyAnalyzeEvaluateCreate
Factslistdescribeinterpretidentifysummarizerelate
Conceptsrecallexplainapplydistinguishreorganizeconclude
Processesnamecontrastorganizeexamineopinionconstruct
Proceduresoutlineexplainwritepoint outcategorizemodel
Principlestellinterpretmodelcomparedetermineselect
Metacognitiveretellinferconstructclassifyconcludeelaborate
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Families by Ann Morris- 6th grade

The next book I chose to talk about is Families by Ann Morris. This book explains the different members of a family.  This book is a non-fiction informational text on the different kinds of families in the world.  The type of genre of the book is a photo essay.  A photo is a short piece of non-fiction. It uses photographs to give information about the topic. This photo essay is about families. The starts by reviewing the key vocabulary words regarding the family members: grandpa, grandma, uncle, aunt, cousin, father, mother, sister, brother, me, and together with a picture to make the input of the language more understandable.  The photo essay continues to explain all the things families do together.  Some of the things, families do together help another, work, play, cook, eat, and celebrate.  Finally, the photo essay ends, showing that children live in many kinds of families and that families are unique in many different ways.  One thing families have in common is that they love, share, and care for each family member no matter where in the world you are from. 

 The unit about home and family is related to English language learners.  ELLs know how to describe their home and family in the target language.  At the same time, students discover that families are all unique and look different in their own special way.  This unit will benefit students in the future because they can apply this knowledge to real-life situations. They will learn how to identify, describe, and model how their house looks like and construct their family tree.  It is essential for the students to realize the families are made up of different family members and that families care, share, and love for one another in all areas of the world. Additionally, this unit benefits English language learners, as it helps them learn content-specific vocabulary that they will utilize in their everyday lives. Furthermore, our English language learners will thrive from this unit on home and family because, at the end of the unit, the students will celebrate their work by presenting their PowerPoint on their home here and in their home country and family tree. Each student will share their project with the class or within their group.

The students have previous knowledge of the structure of the house and household items.  Students also have prior experience in their native language, the names of members that make up a family, as well as background knowledge from their Home language arts class on autobiography and personal narrative unit.  I also front-loaded the key vocabulary words before the lesson.  Students have been practicing the vocabulary words by mix and matching the words with the picture and home language translation. For example, the word family would be matched with the picture labeled “familia.”  Students also completed a rating scale for the vocabulary words than answered questions to deepen their understanding of the word. Key Words: family, together, parents, grandma, grandpa, uncle, aunt, cousin, father, mother, sister, brother, and me. Before the lesson, students had a class discussion on the family tree using the academic vocabulary.  Students used the vocabulary to complete the family tree of the Lin Family and answer questions regarding their family.  Reading “Families”: The class has read “Families” and also listened to the photo essay.  As students read and listen to the photo essay, they completed two diagrams to tell about main ideas of Families.  The main idea is given to the student. However, as they read, the learners need to find details to support the main idea.  The first main idea is that families do a lot of things together. The second main idea is that children live in many kinds of families.  Students will listen to the story as a class. Then with their group re-read the story and complete the main idea diagrams.  Once they completed the main idea diagrams the students will work with their partner to create a chant about their family.  At the end of the lesson, the students will read their chant and realize that everyone has a family, but each of them is unique and special in their own way.  Students are grouped in cooperative learning groups because they can work together and help each other.  The students are grouped primarily by their target language proficiency level involving comprehension as well as their academic knowledge in their native language.

NYS CCSS-ELA Standards:

Reading Standard

CCRA.R.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development ; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. 

CCRA.R.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. 

CCRA.R.10 Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently. 

Writing Standards

CCRA.W.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. 

Speaking and Listening Standards

CCRA.SL.4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style and appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

Language Standards 

CCRA.L.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. 

CCRA.L.6 Acquire and use a range of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when encountering an unknown term important to comprehension or expression. 

Applicable NYS ELL Standards: 

Standard 1 – Social and Instructional Language 
English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting. 

Standard 2 – Language of Language Arts 

English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of language arts. 

Standard 5 – Language of Social Studies 
English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of social studies. 

Objectives:

Content Objective: Students will be able to identify details that support the main idea about families.

Language Objective: Students will be able to write the supporting details in the main idea diagram and say a chant using words about their family.

Key Vocabulary:

  • Family
  • Together
  • Parents
  • Grandmother
  • Grandfather
  • Uncle
  • Aunt
  • Cousin
  • Father
  • Mother
  • Sister
  • Brother
  • Me

Lesson Format for Families:

Essential Question:Are all families the same?
Focus Question:What is your family like?
Academic LanguageUnderstanding the main idea and supporting it with details from the text. 
Guided Questions:What things do families do together?Do all children live in the same kind of family? How many family members are in your family?
Task:As a class we will read and listen to the photo essay on families. Then within their groups they will complete the main idea diagrams. Teacher will assist both groups as they complete the main idea diagrams. Each student will complete a chant about their family. 1. List their family members. Examples: grandmother, brothers2. Tell more about them. Tell how many. Examples: One grandma, two brothers Students will then write a chant. Tell about your family. 

Bloom’s Knowledge Matrix:

The Knowledge DimensionRememberUnder-standApplyAnalyzeEvaluateCreate
Factsrecalldescribeinterpretidentifysummarizejustify
Conceptsidentifyexplainapplybreakdownwritesupport
Processeslistexpressdemonstrateoutlinedevelopconstruct
Proceduresmatchidentifyillustratepoint outcategorizemodel
Principlestellinterpretmodelcomparedetermineselect
Metacognitivedefinedistinguishshowanalyzeexplainelaborate
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Body Works by Janine Wheeler- 7th grade

The last book I choose to talk about is Body Works by Janine Wheeler. This book explains the different parts of the body.  This book is a non-fiction informational text on the different how the body works and healthy habits.  The type of genre of the book is a science essay.  A science essay is a short piece of nonfiction that explains a specific topic that has to do with science. This science essay tells how parts of the body works. The book starts by reviewing the key vocabulary words regarding the body parts: head, shoulder, arms, hands, legs foots and etc. with a picture to make the input of the language more comprehensible.  The science essay breaks down the body parts into different sections in the book. The first section of the book describes the skeleton, then the body parts, then the heart, following with the blood.  Next the book describes the lungs, then nervous system, after that brain and finally the senses.  The science essay finally ends by describing how to keep the body healthy.  

The unit about health and body is related to English language learners because they know how describe their body parts in the target language.  At the same time students discover that the parts of the body and how they work together to keep us healthy.  This unit will benefit students in the future because they can apply this knowledge to real life situations. They will learn how to identify, describe and model how the human body functions.  It is important for the students to realize how the body functions to help communicate themselves at the doctor’s office, with the school nurse or even at the hospital. Additionally, this unit benefits English language learners, as it helps them learn content-specific vocabulary that they will utilize in their everyday lives. Furthermore, our English language learners will thrive from this unit on health and body because at the conclusion of the unit, the students will create research presentation on a human body system and present to the class. The students will work in groups of 2-3 students to complete the research project.  

The students have previous knowledge on the health and body unit.  In 7th grade students are required to take health for the entire year.  During this class students are exposed to many of the vocabulary words and health issues related to the body.  Front loading the key vocabulary is very important.  Prior to the reading lesson student have been practicing the vocabulary. They created post it note vocabulary using each word. They have the post-it notes in their interactive notebook. Key Words: skeleton, stomach, heart, lungs, muscles, nerves, brain, body system, and human body. On another day students had a class discussion and reviewed the different human body parts using a musical chant: Head, shoulders, knees and toes song.  Students labeled their own body worksheet and described the function of each body part, example head, should, eyes, ear and nose.   Reading “Body Works”: The class read “Body Works” and also listened to the science essay.  As a do now students completed a web diagram on the body parts they knew about. As students read and listen to the science essay, they will complete a main idea chart for each section of the book that illustrates a different body part.  The student will do by completing a jig saw reading assignment.  There will be four groups of four.  The home groups will be the student’s main group in class and the expert group will be divided into 4 sections: the skeleton, the muscles, the heart, and the blood.  Each expert group will read about their body part and find the main idea of that section. Students will then go back to their home group and teach each other about the body part they are experts on.  Students will listen to each classmate and complete a chart for each body part. At the end of the lesson each student will have a main idea diagram completed for each section of the book.  The exit slip will be to write the main idea of each body part: the skeleton, the muscles, the heart and the blood.   

NYS CCSS-ELA Standards:

Reading Standard

CCRA.R.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development ; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. 

CCRA.R.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. 

CCRA.R.10 Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently. 

Writing Standards

CCRA.W.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. 

Speaking and Listening Standards

CCRA.SL.4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style and appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

Language Standards 

CCRA.L.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. 

CCRA.L.6 Acquire and use a range of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when encountering an unknown term important to comprehension or expression. 

Applicable NYS ELL Standards: 

Standard 1 – Social and Instructional Language 
English language learners communicate for social and instructional purposes within the school setting. 

Standard 2 – Language of Language Arts 

English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of language arts. 

Standard 4 – Language of Science
English language learners communicate information, ideas and concepts necessary for academic success in the content area of science.

Objectives:

Content Objective: Students will be able to identify main idea about different body parts.

Language Objective: Students will be able to write and say the main idea and supporting details using jigsaw within their groups.

Key Vocabulary:

  • Head
  • Shoulder
  • Arms
  • Eyes
  • Nose
  • Legs
  • Skeleton
  • Heart
  • Muscles
  • Blood

Lesson Format for Body Works:

Essential Question:How does the body work?
Focus Question:What is the main function of each body part?
Academic LanguageUnderstanding the main idea and supporting it with details from the text. 
Guided Questions:What makes your body work??How does each body part work? What is the skeleton?What is muscle contraction?How fast does your heartbeat?What is the circulatory system?
Task:First students will complete the Do now: Complete the web diagram on the body parts that you knowStudents will read and listen to the science essayThey will complete a main idea chart for each section of the book that illustrates a different body part.  The students will do this by completing a jig saw reading assignment.  The class will be divided into four groups of four.  The home groups will be the student’s main group in class and the expert group will be divided into 4 sections: the skeleton, the muscles, the heart, and the blood.  Each expert group will read about their body part and find the main idea of that section. Students will then go back to their home group and teach each other about the body part they are experts on.  Students will listen to each classmate and complete a chart for each body part. At the end of the lesson each student will have a main idea diagram completed for each section of the book.  The exit slip will be to write the main idea of each body part: the skeleton, the muscles, the heart and the blood.   

Bloom’s Knowledge Matrix:

The Knowledge DimensionRememberUnder-standApplyAnalyzeEvaluateCreate
FactslistClassifyDescribeidentifyExplainRelate
ConceptsRecallTranslatePracticePoint outDevelopsupport
ProcessesDescribeIdentifydemonstrateoutlineComposeConclude
ProceduresmatchGive examplesillustrateQuestionCreateInterpret
PrinciplestellRecognizeApplyinfersynthesizeevaluate
MetacognitiveLabelRephraseshowAnalyzeReproduceExplain
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Reference:

Schulman, D. (2014). Escaping Freedom . In Inside: Language, Literacy, Content(pp. 350–357). Monterey, CA: National Geographic Learning/Cengage Learning.

Morris, A. (2013). Families. Columbus, O.H.: Zaner-Bloser.

Moore, D. W., Short, D. J., Smith, M. W., Tatum, A. W., & Villamil Tinajero, J. (2014). Inside: Language, Literacy, Content. Monterey, CA: National Geographic Learning/Cengage Learning

Wheeler, J., & Krames, C. (2000). Body works. Carmel, CA: Hampton-Brown.

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