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CALL-IS Webinar: Authentic Materials for Second Language Acquisition: Sources and Resources presented by Dr. Lubie Alatriste & Moderator Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin

When:  Dec 14, 2022, from 01:00 PM to 02:00 PM (ET)

DESCRIPTION: In this sharing session, we will look at a number of public domain websites that are used for sourcing materials for language teaching. Specifically, we will review pedagogical tools, actual lessons, language aids in terms of videos, readings, practice exercises, and some teacher training materials and resources.


PRESENTER

Lubie Alatriste holds a doctorate from Columbia University and is a professor of English/Applied Linguistics at the City University of New York (CUNY). Her research interests include genre analysis, institutional discourse, reflexivity and praxis in education, second language writing, curriculum, and materials development. Her most recent book-length publication is Language Research in Multilingual Settings (2020, Palgrave MacMillan), and Second Language Writing in Transitional Spaces (2020, University of Michigan Press). She is the author of numerous articles and has served on editorial boards of international journals. Lubie is a founding co-editor/Editor-in-Chief of TESOL Affiliate NYS TESOL Journal. The webinar will be moderated by Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin, Touro University.

LOCATION

Online Instructions:

Url: http://sites.tesol.org/MemberPortal/Events/TESOL%20Webinar/Zoom/TESOL-Event-Detail?eventkey=ZM121422ca
Login: Register through the TESOL webpage

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Touro University TESOL Candidate Evdokia Gasparis’s Content-Area Text Analysis of Samuel Morse’s “That’s Who! The Story of the Telegraph and Morse Code” by Tracy Nelson Maurer

EDDN 637 Second Language Learners and the Content Areas

Students will become acquainted with and practice effective approaches, methods, and strategies for teaching and evaluating English language learners in the content areas (ELA, social studies, math and science). Throughout the course, students will explore the impact of culture and language on classroom learning. Special challenges in teaching and assessment in each content area will also be discussed. Includes 15 hours of fieldwork.

Evdokia Gasparis: My family consists of many English language learners, which has influenced me to pursue a master’s degree in TESOL. I completed a bachelor’s degree in elementary/early childhood education and psychology from Queens College, which led me to attain a 1-6 common branch license. As I expand my knowledge in the field of education, I strive to effectively differentiate all instructional activities to meet the needs of all students. I aspire not simply to teach, but to inspire all my students to challenge their limits!

Alliteration can be located at several points throughout Samuel Morse’s “That’s Who!: The Story of the Telegraph and Morse Code” by Tracy Nelson Maurer. For example, “… tromping from town to town…” and “Success always seemed one step ahead for Samuel.” The academic language is quite challenging, as it is content specific. Content-specific terms include Morse Code, inventions, telegraph, and French Optical Telegraph System. ELLs are at a disadvantage due to their limited background knowledge of the history of the United States. Prior to reading, educators must focus on building background knowledge and pre-teaching vocabulary, in order for students to properly comprehend the literature.

Evdokia Gasparis, Touro University TESOL Candidate

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Touro University TESOL Candidate Shannon Smith on Incorporating Culture into Materials for Multilingual Learners

As educators, incorporating culture into language teaching is crucial. Learning about different cultures can help us approach languages with new insights.
We can feel more connected to our students and our students can connect with each other.

Shannon Smith, Touro University TESOL candidate

EDPN 673 Methods and Materials for Teaching English as a Second Language

This course provides a historical overview of second language acquisition theories and teaching methods. Students learn how to apply current approaches, methods and techniques, with attention to the effective use of materials, in teaching English as a second language. Students will engage in the planning and implementation of standards-based ESL instruction which includes differentiated learning experiences geared to students’ needs. Emphasis is placed on creating culturally responsive learning environments. Includes 15 hours of field work.

Materials Critique & Redesign: Candidates will: (1) prepare a written critique description of the material or resource, analyzing its effectiveness for ELLs and (2) based on your analysis, redesign one section/activity (which could be an infographic, mindmap or anything that shows a redesign) of the original material so that it meets the need of ELLs. The materials chosen will promote culturally and linguistically responsive classrooms and instructional practices.

  • Candidates will promote culturally and linguistically responsive classrooms and instructional practices
  • Candidates will apply strategies to adapting grade-level, content area instruction to include culturally and linguistically different students as well as gifted and special education ELLs.

Touro University TESOL candidate Shannon Smith is a graduate student at Touro University pursuing a master’s degree in the TESOL program. She is certified in general education and special education 1-6.

Ms. Smith, “I am currently teaching a Kindergarten class that has a majority of ENL students. All of the courses I have taken at Touro and all of the professors have been preparing me for the real world. I thoroughly have been enjoying learning different strategies to implement in my Kindergarten classroom.”

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Touro University TESOL candidate Cynthia Olavarria’s Analysis of Gary the Monster by Charlesworth

EDPN 673 Methods and Materials for Teaching English as a Second Language

This course provides a historical overview of second language acquisition theories and teaching methods. Students learn how to apply current approaches, methods and techniques, with attention to the effective use of materials, in teaching English as a second language. Students will engage in the planning and implementation of standards-based ESL instruction which includes differentiated learning experiences geared to students’ needs. Emphasis is placed on creating culturally responsive learning environments. Includes 15 hours of field work.

Materials Critique & Redesign: Candidates will: (1) prepare a written critique description of the material or resource, analyzing its effectiveness for ELLs and (2) based on your analysis, redesign one section/activity (which could be an infographic, mindmap or anything that shows a redesign) of the original material so that it meets the need of ELLs. The materials chosen will promote culturally and linguistically responsive classrooms and instructional practices.

  • Candidates will promote culturally and linguistically responsive classrooms and instructional practices
  • Candidates will apply strategies to adapting grade-level, content area instruction to include culturally and linguistically different students as well as gifted and special education ELLs.

Touro University TESOL candidate Cynthia Olavarria is a Special Education Educator in an elementary school in Brooklyn, New York. “I believe in collaboration so we can make changes in the lives of our youth.”

This book is a great way for kids to build on what they already know about colors and feelings while also learning something new. Looking at page 2-3 the author uses the skill of rhyming to grab the reader’s attention. “Gary is big, Gary is green. Gary is hairy. And Gary thinks EVERYTHING is scary.” (Charlesworth, Gary the Monster, 2018, pp. 3-4) This skill can be a little difficult for students to learn. Rhyming is hard for students who are not ELL’s so we know that it can be significantly challenging for students who are ELL’s.

Cynthia Olavarria, Touro University TESOL candidate

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Touro University TESOL Candidate Marizabel Nunez’s Comprehensible Input Mindmap for Multilingual Learners

EDDN 637 Second Language Learners and the Content Areas

Students will become acquainted with and practice effective approaches, methods, and strategies for teaching and evaluating English language learners in the content areas (ELA, social studies, math and science). Throughout the course, students will explore the impact of culture and language on classroom learning. Special challenges in teaching and assessment in each content area will also be discussed. Includes 15 hours of fieldwork.

“I attended Touro College and earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology and a master’s degree in education, teaching students with disabilities in grades 7-12. Professor Cowin has taught me much about the theory of bilingual teaching, learning, practice, and strategies to use with English language learners this semester.”

Marizabel Nunez, Touro University TESOL Candidate

References

How to teach such that they understand(2018) The Comprehensible Classroom. Available at: https://comprehensibleclassroom.com/2018/07/26/how-to-teach-such-that-they-understand/Links to an external site.

Lesson plans: Using procedures (2015) TeacherVision

Touro University TESOL Candidate Marizabel Nunez was born and raised in Brooklyn, New York. Her family is from the Dominican Republic, and most of them are linguistically diverse.

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Completion of Module Making Workshop with the Department of Online Education!

I completed the Module Making Workshop with the Department of Online Education at Touro University.

In order to teach online courses as an instructor at Touro College,I wanted to learn more about how to elevate setting up course modules for your online course(s). The Module Making Workshop is a 4-week course guided me through the essential components of creating an online module including creating measurable learning objectives, adding critical design elements (e.g., headers), and creating a logical flow to course content.

The components of this workshop adhere to the standards outlined in Touro’s Rubric for Online Education, which is the instrument used to evaluate the quality of online courses at Touro.

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Touro University Bilingual Candidate Paola Gomez’s Demonstration of the Total Physical Response Method

“As a professor, I created this blog as a mechanism to support, appreciate and showcase exemplary work of my graduate and professional Touro University TESOL/BLE teacher candidates. By emphasizing candidates’ best work, and their innovative, thoughtful, reflective contributions I provide a path to shift the focus to their professional values while recognizing and celebrating their significant milestones in the Touro University TESOL/BLE program.” by Jasmin (Bey) Cowin

EDPN 673 Methods and Materials for Teaching English as a Second Language

This course provides a historical overview of second language acquisition theories and teaching methods. Students learn how to apply current approaches, methods and techniques, with attention to the effective use of materials, in teaching English as a second language. Students will engage in the planning and implementation of standards-based ESL instruction which includes differentiated learning experiences geared to students’ needs. Emphasis is placed on creating culturally responsive learning environments. Includes 15 hours of fieldwork.

Mrs. Paola Gomez was born in the Bronx and raised partially in the Dominican Republic. She attended Hunter College where she received her degree in Music Performance and Touro University, GSE where she received her master’s in education. She is currently a teacher at P186X, where she hopes to integrate her bilingual teaching skills acquired from Touro University’s bilingual education program.

Paola wishes to thank her family, her husband, Justin, and her professor, Dr. Jasmin Cowin, for her support and dedication to candidate learning during the fall semester of 2022.

For my multilingual learners, the total physical response mini lesson centered around the vocabulary words of body parts gave them the opportunity to make a connection between body parts in their language and body parts in English. For example, if I were to show just the name of each body part, without any visual support and physical action to go with it, my multilingual learners might had struggled to understand that Mouth is Boca. Having the visual support accompanied by the motor activity, helped the students to successfully identify, recall, and acquire new vocabulary in a new language.

Paola Gomez, Touro University Bilingual Candidate

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Evdokia Gasparis, Touro University TESOL Candidate & Differentiated Instructional Activity Math Lesson

“As a professor, I created this blog as a mechanism to support, appreciate and showcase exemplary work of my graduate and professional Touro University TESOL/BLE teacher candidates. By emphasizing candidates’ best work, and their innovative, thoughtful, reflective contributions I provide a path to shift the focus to their professional values, while recognizing and celebrating their significant milestones in the Touro University TESOL/BLE program.” by Jasmin (Bey) Cowin

As a professor, I created this blog as a mechanism to support, appreciate and showcase exemplary work of my graduate and professional Touro University TESOL/BLE teacher candidates. By emphasizing candidates’ best work, and their innovative, thoughtful, reflective contributions I provide a path to shift the focus to their professional values, while recognizing and celebrating their significant milestones in the Touro University TESOL/BLE program.

Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin (Assistant Professor and TESOL Practicum Coordinator, Touro University, GSE)

EDDN 637 Second Language Learners and the Content Areas: Students will become acquainted with and practice effective approaches, methods, and strategies for teaching and evaluating English language learners in the content areas (ELA, social studies, math and science). Throughout the course, students will explore the impact of culture and language on classroom learning. Special challenges in teaching and assessment in each content area will also be discussed. Includes 15 hours of fieldwork.

Evdokia Gasparis: “My family consists of many English language learners, which has influenced me to pursue a master’s degree in TESOL. I completed a bachelor’s degree in elementary/early childhood education and psychology from Queens College, which led me to attain a 1-6 common branch license. As I expand my knowledge in the field of education, I strive to effectively differentiate all instructional activities to meet the needs of all students. I aspire not simply to teach, but to inspire all my students to challenge their limits!”

EDDN 637:

Assignment Description Differentiated Instructional Activity:

For your Differentiated Instructional Activity Assignment, using the Key Elements of Differentiated Instruction.pdf Download Key Elements of Differentiated Instruction.pdf you will use one of your content lesson plans you have already taught and make modifications to support Multilingual Learners to the following segments:

  1. practice (how teachers deliver instruction to students),
  2. process (how the lesson is designed for students),
  3. products (the kinds of work products students will be asked to complete),
  4. content (the specific readings, research, or materials, students will study),
  5. assessment (how teachers measure what students have learned), and
  6. grouping (how students are arranged in the classroom or paired up with other students).

You will submit both the original content lesson and plan and the lesson plan with differentiated instructional activities, with a reflection of your professional growth completing this assignment. Your product for Differentiated Instructional Activity Assignment will be:

  1. A paper including the original lesson plan/differentiated lesson plan addressing points 1 -6 above
  2. 2-4 minute video showcasing one specific aspect of one of your Differentiated Instructional Activities

Picture Walk Video Evdokia Gasparis, Touro University TESOL Candidate
Entering / Emerging Differentiated Worksheet
Entering / Emerging Differentiated Worksheet
Entering / Emerging Differentiated Worksheet
Expanding Differentiated Worksheet
Transitioning / Bridging Differentiated Worksheet

“…all students work at different speeds, therefore it is essential to group students strategically to provide needed support. During the differentiated lesson, students are grouped homogenously. Homogenous grouping allows students, with similar academic needs and readiness, to collectively complete assignments (Levine, 2012). The intent of grouping students with similar levels of readiness is to scaffold lessons that allow students to work in their zone of proximal development (ZPD) (Levine, 2012).”

Evdokia Gasparis, Touro University TESOL Candidate

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“Coming to America: The Story of Immigration,” by Betsy Maestro and Touro University TESOL Candidate Ada Hirschfeld’s Text Analysis

EDDN 637 Second Language Learners and the Content Areas: Students will become acquainted with and practice effective approaches, methods, and strategies for teaching and evaluating English language learners in the content areas (ELA, social studies, math and science). Throughout the course, students will explore the impact of culture and language on classroom learning. Special challenges in teaching and assessment in each content area will also be discussed. Includes 15 hours of fieldwork.

Adah Hirschfeld is a New York City Public School librarian who currently works at IS 240 in Midwood, Brooklyn. She holds a Master of Library and Information Science degree from Pratt Institute and a Master’s degree in School Administration from Touro University. She is pursuing certification in TESOL to better meet her students’ language and literacy needs.

The Text Analysis discusses the cognitive and linguistic demands of a content area text. Touro University TESOL/BLE candidates closely analyze a chapter, or an aspect of one content-area text currently in use or recommended by New York State/BOE. Upon analysis of underlying concepts, they develop a thesis and purpose for their analysis. Mrs. Hirschfeld’s paper sequences her ideas with evidence from the text supporting essential points. Her critique features substantial, logical, and concrete development of ideas describing what makes that concept or section challenging for ELLs.

Phonics and phonological decoding of the multi-syllabic words may be difficult for ELL students. Examples of words that do not follow standard rules are: ocean, fascinating, officials, unique, foreign. Students would have to be aware of the hard and soft “c” sounds of recent, cities, places, and appreciation. As well as the spelling patterns and pronunciation of words ending in -gh and -ght.

Ada Hirschfeld, Touro University TESOL Candidate

Overall, this is a highly complex text for English language learners. The sentence length, multisyllabic unknown words, and academic vocabulary are difficult for readers to comprehend without scaffolds and modifications. The illustrations correspond to and enhance the text allowing the reader to gain an understanding but without the visual enhancement, meaning may be lost.

Ada Hirschfeld, Touro University TESOL Candidate
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John Zurschmiede & Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin present ”Community Asset Mapping and Linguistically Diverse Learners” at the NTSTESOL 52nd Annual Conference, “Shifting Teaching Paradigms: Examining Inclusive and Dynamic Practices,” November 2-5, 2022, White Plains, NY

John Zurscmiede, Touro University, TESOL Program Completer

How can educators better support linguistically diverse students and their families was a question hotly debated in the Touro University bilingual and multicultural education discussion boards by Touro University TESOL teacher candidates. The discussion boards focused on English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) teacher praxis’, highlighting the targeted inclusion of asset-based approaches. As a professor leading the discussions, the topic sparked deep reflection, and a goal crystallized: to create and implement an impactful hands-on project. The discussion centered around shifting teaching paradigms towards more inclusive, dynamic practices empowering Multilingual Learners (ML). Teachers often enter their profession unprepared to draw on the strengths and assets that culturally and linguistically diverse students bring to school.  (Elfers, 2013)

Out of the discussion boards grew a book chapter with a former teacher John Zurschmiede, post-degree completion: ACROSS BOUNDARIES: COMMUNITY ASSET MAPPING AND LINGUISTICALLY DIVERSE LEARNERS, in which John Zurschmiede, now a teacher at the Board of Education, at an International school, co-constructed not only a project but also meaning-making in a collaborative space bringing together different dimensions of teacher-learner in two different levels. Level 1: the faculty-teacher candidate, Level 2: The former teacher candidate – his Multilingual Learners. This was an interwoven process that created fertile spaces of intentional collaboration across boundaries resulting in a book chapter in “Supporting Student Success through Community Asset Mapping.”

I am deeply grateful for the collaboration with my former student John Zurschmiede which expanded my horizon as an educator and shifted my teaching paradigms. I experienced that funds of knowledge are not static as we are all life-long learners embedded in the tapestry of our communities, personal histories and experiences which we express through our unique linguistic landscapes.

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Touro University Online Summit 22 Presentation  by Jasmin Cowin, Ed.D. on “AI, Avatars and 21st Century Simulation Training for Educators”

AI and intelligent systems are positioned to become change agents in education through ushering in profound changes in institutional administrative and teaching functions, systemic strategic planning, and program planning. Post-pandemic, the explosive growth of fully-accredited online degrees has also reached teacher education programs. However, any online teacher education program needs alternative pathways to support teacher candidates in their online journey at Touro University and towards teacher certification. This lightening talk focused on alternative meeting, teaching and advising spaces in metaverses such as Agora World. Meeting in such alternative, closed-loop spaces fosters positive faculty-candidate interaction, provides pathways for collaborative experiences, nurtures self-efficiacy, and the ability to partner authentically through talking, presenting, debating within groups in a constructed safe metaverse space.

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VOICE22 on Demand Session Recordings: Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin – AI, Avatars and 21st Century Simulation Training for Educators

Session recordings are now available to watch On Demand. Keynotes, interviews and panel discussions from top brands explore real world examples of those successfully integrating conversational AI and automation to drive innovation throughout their organizations. Catch any sessions you may have missed or watch your favorites again! You can register here to get access to VOICE22 and my presentation recording from Agora World:

Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin – AI, Avatars and 21st Century Simulation Training for Educators

AI and intelligent systems are positioned to become change agents in education through ushering in profound changes in institutional administrative functions, systemic strategic planning, and program planning. Post-pandemic, the explosive growth of fully-accredited online degrees has also reached teacher education programs. However, any online program in teacher education needs alternative pathways to support teacher candidates who are required to complete practicum and fieldwork hours.

This lightning talk focuses on reviewing, contrasting, and framing two distinct immersive ecosystems. Mursion and simSchool. While both platforms offer immersive experiences simSchool is AI-driven while Mursion employs mixed reality simulations. Both provide preservice teachers a platform to practice and rehearse the art and skill of teaching within a controlled simulation setting using avatars. Insights on evidence-based practices by teacher candidates are generated through data from both AI and candidates’ in-world experiences. Such data aggregation offers institutions informed decision-making through a systematic review using technology to improve teacher education programs.

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Presenting at the TESOL 2023 International Convention & English Language Expo in Portland, Oregon, USA

Together with my dear colleagues and peers Ching-Ching Lin, Ed. D. and Nikki Bell we will be presenting on our NYS TESOL e-book project “Enacting culturally responsive pedagogies through community assets mapping: A NYS TESOL Story,” which has been included in the TESOL 2023 convention program, held on 21–24 March in Portland, Oregon, USA.

Join a global community of English language professionals for the TESOL 2023 Convention & English Language Expo, 21-24 March!

Through engaging in-person events, you will be able to:

  • Connect with our global community of English language professionals. 
  • Choose from 900 in-person sessions.
  • Access 200 virtual sessions. That’s right, in-person registration includes access to the Virtual Convention!   
  • Interact with exhibitors showcasing the latest ELT products and services.
  • Press reset and get away from your classroom or office.
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“Reunion, Resilience & Reciprocity: Fulbright’s Yemini English Teacher Trainees,” presented at Fulbright’s 2022 Conference by Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin & Dr. Abdullah Al Ghurbani

Fulbright 22 Yemini TESOL Graduates

Reunion, Resilience & Reciprocity: Fulbright’s Yemini English Teacher Trainees
General Session: 60 Minute Presentation and Discussion

Presenter Information:
Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin
Touro University – Assistant Professor and TESOL Practicum Coordinator
Dr. Cowin is a Fulbright Scholar; Assistant Professor and TESOL Practicum Coordinator at Touro University; sustainability advisor for access and equity for Computers for Schools Burundi; collaborator with Prof. Abdullah Al Ghurbani, President of Future Horizons Foundation for Translation, Training, and Development a teacher training and translation institution in Sanaa, Yemen, member of the TESOL International CALL-IS Steering Committee, co-Chair of the of the Technology Enhanced Language Learning SIG 2022 conference, conference chair of the 51st NYS TESOL conference 2021. Recent presentations focused on Computers for Schools Burundi: Gukorera Hamwe through Cultural Competency Training, Yemeni TESOL Teaching & Training for the Future: Exploring Google, Virtual Field Trips and Open Educational Resources (OER’s), The Metaverse: Layers, Applications, and Terminology, The Next Normal: Metaverse, Virtual Beings, AI cloning for the World Higher Education Ranking Summit (WHERS), Dubai, UAE.

Dr. Abdullah Al Ghurbani, Ph.D.
Fulbright recipient (2005 USA), Prof. Abdullah Al Ghurbani, Ph.D., President of Future Horizons Foundation for Translation, Training, and Development a teacher training and translation institution in Sanaa, Yemen has 29 years of experience in the field of teaching English as a foreign/second language. He holds a Ph.D. in English Literature, English Department, College of Languages, Sana’a University and was sponsored through a Fulbright grant to acquire the SIT TESOL certification at Rennert International, New York, U.S.A, 2012.

Session Abstract:
This presentation gives a voice to Fulbright grant funded Teaching English as a Second Language (TESOL) teacher trainees who were trained in Sanaa, Yemen. In alignment with this year’s theme ” Resilience”, this presentation showcases two Fulbright alumni, one from Yemen, the other from the US who reunited through LinkedIn and teamed up to reciprocate with teacher training. The presentation will explore Yemini TESOL teacher candidate’s perceptions on their professional growth through their weekly reflections during their Fulbright funded training cycle. Participants will explore, discuss and celebrate these meaningful journeys by engaging with the concept of reflective practice and the idea of Chris Argyris double-loop learning.

Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin & Dr. Abdullah Al Ghurbani

VIDEO: Reunion, Resilience & Reciprocity: Fulbright’s Yemini English Teacher Trainees

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Xiao Sun, a Touro University Bilingual Certificate Candidate Thoughts on “What is Langauge?” for EDDN 637, Second Language Learners and the Content Areas

EDDN 637 Second Language Learners and the Content Areas: Students will become acquainted with and practice effective approaches, methods, and strategies for teaching and evaluating English language learners in the content areas (ELA, social studies, math and science). Throughout the course, students will explore the impact of culture and language on classroom learning. Special challenges in teaching and assessment in each content area will also be discussed. Includes 15 hours of fieldwork.

Xiao Sun started her career in the education field as a paraprofessional. She has worked in NYC District 25 for five years and holds a Master of Media and Governance from Keio University. Last year, she earned her Master of Early Childhood Education and Special Education from Touro University. She is a DOE-certified teacher with B-2nd general education and special education licenses. In addition, she pursues her bilingual advanced certificate with Touro University.

Discussion Boards in Touro University courses serve as an important way we establish ‘community’ with fellow classmates and me, the faculty. It’s how the cohort of learners ‘participate’ online to develop conversations by analyzing the posted questions and applying critical thinking skills. As this is a graduate program, I want to encourage the habit of citing references and require a reference section. Xiao Sun posted a thorough discussion board showcasing not only her grasp of the readings but also analysis and interpretation.

There is no one size fit all approach that could support all students learning. For different types of learners, we need to apply a different strategy to improve their L2 proficiency.

Xiao Sun, Touro University Bilingual Certificate Candidate

Discussion 2: What is Language? 

  1. Have you had any students who were proficient in social language but struggled with academic language? 

Most of my students are ELLs from kindergarten to second grade. Most of my teaching experiences are in self-contained classrooms or ICT classrooms. I haven’t had any students who were proficient in social language but struggled with academic language since most of them are younger children.  

2. Celce-Murcia Chapter edition 4 Chapter 1: 

What changes have occurred regarding the teaching of a) pronunciation, b) grammar, and c) vocabulary in the many approaches discussed in this chapter? Has there been a swinging of the pendulum in respect to the teaching of these areas? Why or why not? 

In the pre-twentieth -century, the key approaches are getting learners to use a language and getting learners to analyze a language. There are “the grammar-translation approach,” “the direct method,” and “the reform movement.” The grammar-translation approach emphasizes that “instruction is given in the native language of the students. There is little use of the target language for communication. The focus is on the forms and inflections of words. The result of this approach is usually an inability on the part of the students to use the language for communication.” (Kelly, 1969). The direct method is more focused on the ability to use rather than analyze a language. During the reform movement (1886), Henry Sweet, Wilhelm Vietor, and Paul Passy developed the International Phonetic Alphabet to establish the scientific rule that focused on teaching pronunciation and oral skills. (Howatt,2004)  

In the early and mid-twentieth-century, there is “the reading approach,” “the audiolingual approach,” and “the oral-situational approach” were proposed by linguists. According to West (1941), reading comprehension is the only language skill emphasized in the reading approach. Only grammar and helpful vocabulary for reading comprehension are taught. The audiolingual approach is proposed based on the principle of the reform movement and the direct method. This approach focuses on practicing sounds, pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar. The “oral-situation approach” focuses on the spoken language and provides the learners maximum opportunity to practice the target language. 

The recent approaches to language teaching are cognitive, affective, humanistic, comprehension, and communicative approaches. The cognitive approach emphasized that “language acquisition is viewed as the learning of a system of infinitely extendable rules based on meaningful exposure” (Chomsky, 1959,1965). The affective-humanistic approach emphasizes that “learning a language is a social and personal process” and a “positive social climate in the classroom” (Curran,1976) could support language learning. The comprehension-based approach argues that L2 learning is similar to L1 acquisition and extends exposure and comprehension. Finally, the communicative approach aims to improve learners’ communication ability in the target language.  

The pendulum has been swinging for teaching these areas. Because we never know the best approach or method to support the L2 learning of our students. There is no one size fit all approach that could support all students learning. For different types of learners, we need to apply a different strategy to improve their L2 proficiency. In different periods, the purpose of learning L2 is also different. For example, in the early days, people paid more attention to whether they could understand the writing contents in the target language. In the mid-term days, people pay more attention to whether they can use the correct grammar and pronunciation in the target language. Now, we pay more attention to building up the learners’ ability to communicate in the target language. 

The recent approaches to language teaching are cognitive, affective, humanistic, comprehension, and communicative approaches. The cognitive approach emphasized that “language acquisition is viewed as the learning of a system of infinitely extendable rules based on meaningful exposure” (Chomsky, 1959,1965). The affective-humanistic approach emphasizes that “learning a language is a social and personal process” and a “positive social climate in the classroom” (Curran,1976) could support language learning. The comprehension-based approach argues that L2 learning is similar to L1 acquisition and extends exposure and comprehension. Finally, the communicative approach aims to improve learners’ communication ability in the target language.  

3. Celce-Murcia Chapter edition 4 Chapter 2:  

How is Communicative Language Teaching (CLT) related to other proficiency-based approaches to language teaching? 

There are three theoretical frameworks discussed.  

The first is the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Language standards (ACTFL). This framework has five components (the Five C’s model): communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities.  By following this framework, learners are taught to focus on “what is the overall purpose and meaning of the texts, and what is cultural or other background knowledge is relevant?” and “what vocabulary or grammatical forms are involved, and what meanings are being conveyed by these?” (Celce-Murica, 2013) There are also three primary modes of communication cultivated by this proficiency-based approach: interpersonal, such like exchanging ideas; interpretive, such like understandings of content, and presentational, such like communicating through oral or written reports. 

The second framework is the Common European Framework of Reference for languages. (CEFR) According to Duff (2008), this framework “encourage learners, teachers, and teacher educators to collect evidence of learners’ proficiency and language learning biographies through various media, including multimedia personal learning portfolios and multilingual repertoire.” 

The third communicative, proficiency-based framework mentioned in this section is the Canadian Language Benchmark. (CLB) This framework is “based on a functional view of language, language use, and language proficiency.” (Pawlikowska-Smith,2002) Under this framework, teachers could assess students’ linguistic, textual, functional, and sociocultural competence to support them improve language skills. 

References 

Celce-Murcia, M. (2013). Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language. Fourth  Edition. Heinle Cengage Publishing. ISBN-13: 978-1111351694. ISBN-10:  111135169 

Chomsky, N. (1959). Review of the book Verbal Behavior by B.F. Skinner. Language,  35,26-58  

Curran, C.A. (1976). Counseling-learning in second-language learning. East Dubuque, II,:  Counseling Learning Publication 

Duff, P. A. (2008). APEC second foreign language standards and their assessment:  Trends, opportunities, and implications. 

Kelly, L. G. (1969). Twenty-four centuries of language teaching. New York, NY:  Newbury House. 

Howatt, A.P.R. with H.G., Widdowson (2004). A history of English language teaching (2nd ed.). Oxford University Press. 

Pawlikowska-Smith, G. (2000). Canadian language benchmarks: Theoretical framework.  Ottawa, Canada: Centre for Canadian Language Benchmarks. 

West, M. (1953) A general service list of English words. Landon, UK: Longman, Green &Co. 

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Reimagine and Redesign: Augmented Reality Digital Technologies & 21st Century Education by Jasmin (Bey) Cowin on Kindle Edition

Jasmin (Bey) Cowin, Ed.D., Assistant Professor and TESOL Practicum CoordinatorTouro University, Graduate School of Education, New York, NY Google Scholar Profile: Dr. Jasmin Cowin, Orchid ID: 0000-0002-0405-8774

Reimagine and Redesign: Augmented Reality Digital Technologies & 21st Century Education Kindle Edition

It is finally done! I published my essay on augmented digital reality technologies, big data, and the need for a teacher workforce on Kindle! The essay explores applications and educational use cases of augmented reality digital technologies for educational organizations during the Fourth Industrial Revolution. The Fourth Industrial Revolution requires vision, flexibility, and innovative educational conduits by governments and educational institutions to remain competitive in a global economy while simultaneously working towards new governance structures aimed to mitigate external interruptions and algorithmic biases by Artificial Intelligence algorithmic models. Educational organizations will need to focus on teaching in and for a digital age to continue offering academic knowledge relevant to 21st-century markets and changing labor force needs. Implementing contemporary disciplines will need to be embodied through learners’ active knowledge-making experiences while embracing ubiquitous accessibility. The power of Distributed Ledger Technology promises major streamlining for educational record-keeping, degree conferrals, and authenticity guarantees. Augmented reality digital technologies (ARDT) hold the potential to restructure educational philosophies and their underpinning pedagogies thereby transforming modes of delivery. Structural changes in education and governmental planning are already increasing through intelligent systems and big data. Reimagining and redesigning education on a broad scale is required to plan and implement governmental and institutional changes to harness innovative technologies while moving away from the industrial manufacturing labor force.
Keywords—Fourth Industrial Revolution, artificial intelligence, big data, education, Augmented Reality Digital Technologies, Distributed Ledger Technology

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Unidos: Inclusivity for a Stronger Nation Hispanic Heritage Month 2022 – Resources for Hispanic Heritage Month, designed by Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin

What is in your Heritage Month 2022 Resources for Hispanic Heritage Month Toolkit? I designed an infographic as a contribution to all educators who would like to find more resources for Hispanic Heritage Month 2022.

“If you have an opportunity to make things better and you don’t, then you are wasting your time on Earth.”

Roberto Clemente

The PDF features clickable links.

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Unidos: Inclusivity for a Stronger Nation – Celebrating National Hispanic Heritage Month 2022

Unidos: Inclusivity for a Stronger Nation – Celebrating National Hispanic Heritage Month 2022

Recognizing the achievements and contributions of Hispanic American champions who have inspired others to achieve success led me to discover new composers and artists and their music and art of Latin and Hispanic descent. Of course, my resource is only a beginning, “A Place to Start.”

Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin
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Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin is presenting at VOICE, The Event Focusing on the Conversational AI Community

Voice 2022 Logo

My topic: AI, Avatars and 21st Century Simulation Training for Educators

AI and intelligent systems are positioned to become change agents in education through ushering in profound changes in institutional administrative functions, systemic strategic planning, and program planning. Post-pandemic, the explosive growth of fully-accredited online degrees has also reached teacher education programs. However, any online program in teacher education needs alternative pathways to support teacher candidates who are required to complete practicum and fieldwork hours.

This lightning talk focuses on reviewing, contrasting, and framing two distinct immersive ecosystems. Mursion and simSchool. While both platforms offer immersive experiences simSchool is AI-driven while Mursion employs mixed reality simulations. Both provide preservice teachers a platform to practice and rehearse the art and skill of teaching within a controlled simulation setting using avatars. Insights on evidence-based practices by teacher candidates are generated through data from both AI and candidates’ in-world experiences. Such data aggregation offers institutions informed decision-making through a systematic review using technology to improve teacher education programs.

The Voices At The Cutting Edge of Conversational AI.

I am excited to be speaking at #VOICE22 on October 10-12. I invite you to join me as the world plans for ways to reconnect, restore, and reinvigorate plans for growth in 2023.

  • 💡 Discover ways you can modernize your call center to meet customer expectations.
  • 💡 Get a first-hand look at digital transformation initiatives to improve and automate the customer experience.
  • 💡 Learn how you can develop and implement custom assistants to improve efficiency.
  • 💡 Connect with creators, companies, solutions providers, investors, and media from around the world.

Register here: https://www.voicesummit.ai/

https://www.voicesummit.ai/speakers

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Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin presents “The Three Pillars: Strategic Augmented Reality Digital Technologies Implemetation” at the International Conference on Innovation in Basic – Higher Education, İstanbul, Türkiye

It was my honor to present “The Three Pillars: Strategic Augmented Reality Digital Technologies (ARDT) Implementation” at the International Conference on Innovation in Basic – Higher Education (September 8-11, 2022) İstanbul, Türkiye (Republic of Turkey).


The purpose of this presentation was to frame and share my thoughts on The Three Pillars: Strategic Augmented Reality Digital Technologies (ARDT) Implementation for institutions of Higher Education. To offer ARDTs with functional 3D immersive spaces such as metaverses requires a robust institutional system-wide Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) discussion. TEL integrations not only ask for a highly qualified educator workforce but also demand articulated, interconnected institutional, educator, and learner cultures. The podcast would articulate the three different cultures institutions, educators, and learners to engage in meaningful conversations around ARDTs. The goal was to explore, discuss and debate the purposeful implementation of 21st Century technologies such as metaverses into Institutions of Higher Education while analyzing their positive potential and possible dangers they bring to higher education institutions.

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Affirming Diversity & Socio-Political Contexts: Reflections by Touro University Bilingual Certificate Candidate Paola Gomez, EDPN 671

EDPN 671 Theory and Practice of Bilingual and Multicultural Education

This course reviews the impact of historical, legal, sociological, and political issues in relationship to the education of culturally and linguistically diverse students. Students explore the evolution of attitudes regarding bilingualism and multiculturalism in the United States. Emphasis will be placed on developing multicultural competence as educators, with areas of focus including: cross-cultural communication in the classroom and with parents; how the language and culture of the home and the community impact student learning; cultural factors in the relationships between the school and the community. Models of multicultural and bilingual education will be presented and analyzed. Includes 10 hours of field work.

Mrs. Paola Gomez was born in the Bronx and raised partially in the Dominican Republic. She attended Hunter College where she received her degree in Music Performance and Touro College where she received her master’s in education. She is currently a teacher at P186X, where she hopes to integrate her bilingual skills acquired from Touro College’s bilingual education program.

Paola wishes to thank her family, her husband, Justin, and her professor, Dr. Jasmin Cowin, for her support and dedication to candidate learning during the summer semester 2022.

There is an overwhelming amount of research that confirms that an achievement gap does exist in our public education system. According to Nieto and Bode, “41 percent of whites are reading at grade level, only 15 percent of Hispanics and 13 percent of African Americans are at grade level. The gap worsens through the years: Black and Hispanics twelfth graders perform at the same level in reading and math as white eighth graders” (Nieto & Bode, 2018, p.9). The reason why this is happening is because the achievement of this group of students is related directly to the conditions and contexts in which these students learn.

Paola Gomez, Touro University Bilingual Certificate Candidate
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Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin will present “The three pillars: Strategic Augmented Reality Digital Technologies (ARDT) Implementation” at the International Conference on Innovation in Basic – Higher Education, September 8-11, 2022 İstanbul, Türkiye (Republic of Turkey)

I am excited to be presenting The three pillars: Strategic Augmented Reality Digital Technologies (ARDT) implementation for International Conference on Innovation in Basic – Higher Education, September 8-11, 2022 İstanbul, Türkiye (Republic of Turkey)

Our conference theme on innovations in basic and higher education will give educators wonderful opportunity to learn more about the latest innovations and cutting-edge research in basic and higher education as well as share best practices in teaching and learning, leadership and administration, and research partnerships.
We look forward to seeing you in Istanbul (8-11 September 2022).

Dr. Patrick Blessinger (President, HETL)

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Poland and Polish Culture: Touro University TESOL Gabrielle Mescia’s Cultural Investigation Report for EDPN 671

EDPN 671: Theory and Practice of Bilingual and Multicultural Education: This course reviews the impact of historical, legal, sociological, and political issues in relationship to the education of culturally and linguistically diverse students. Students explore the evolution of attitudes regarding bilingualism and multiculturalism in the United States. Emphasis will be placed on developing multicultural competence as educators, with areas of focus including: cross-cultural communication in the classroom and with parents; how the language and culture of the home and the community impact student learning; cultural factors in the relationships between the school and the community. Models of multicultural and bilingual education will be presented and analyzed. Includes 10 hours of field work.

Gabrielle Mescia is a Pre-K teacher in the West Islip School District in Long Island, NY. Gabrielle graduated from St. Joseph’s College in May 2020 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Child Study, and is currently pursuing a Master’s degree in TESOL at Touro College. In her free time she enjoys cooking, reading, exercising, and spending time with her loved ones.

Gabrielle Mescia, Touro University, TESOL Candidate

I learned quite a bit from this investigation of Polish culture, and I am glad that I chose this project to inform my knowledge and meet the changing needs of my school population. I will be able to use what I learned going forward to provide Polish families with resources and bring students’ culture into the classroom with bilingual and multicultural books and materials. Additionally, I now know many of the differences between Polish and English, and the areas where these students may struggle with learning the language. Here some examples: The polish alphabet (alfabet polski) consists of 32 letters (23 consonants and 9 vowels). Unlike other slavic languages, the polish language (język polski) uses Latin Script with additional diacritics for the special polish phonemes (such as ą and ł). A good rule to remember is that with the most Polish words, the stress lies on the second last syllable. There is no English equivalent of any of the Polish vowels.

Gabrielle Mescia, Touro University, TESOL Candidate
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“The Empty Pot” by DEMI and Touro University TESOL candidate Kate Yanovich’s Materials Critique & Redesign for EDPN 673

For EDPN 673 Methods and Materials for Teaching English as a Second Language. This course provides a historical overview of second language acquisition theories and teaching methods. Students learn how to apply current approaches, methods and techniques, with attention to the effective use of materials, in teaching English as a second language. Students will engage in the planning and implementation of standards-based ESL instruction which includes differentiated learning experiences geared to students’ needs. Emphasis is placed on creating culturally responsive learning environments. Includes 15 hours of field work.

Touro TESOL candidates submit a Materials Critique & Redesign where candidates (1) prepare a written critique description of the material or resource, analyzing its effectiveness for ELLs and (2) based on your analysis, redesign one section/activity of the original material so that it meets the need of ELLs. The materials chosen will promote culturally and linguistically responsive classrooms and instructional practices.

My name is Kate Yanovich and I teach in the New York City elementary public school in Brooklyn. I have taught students of different ages, ranging from Pre-K to middle school, and being licensed in special education, I also worked with students and young adults with special needs. Currently, I am pursuing the TESOL Graduate degree at Touro College and look forward to working more closely with second language and multilingual learners in their educational journeys.

Kate Yanovich, Touro University TESOL Candidate

The Empty Pot by Demi (1990)New York: Henry Holt and Company.

Kate Yanovich:

“Generally, this book is used for a read aloud in the 1st grade classroom. I would use this book as a shared reading to differentiate for a small group of 2nd grade ELLs on expanding level who are below grade level in reading and are working on reading comprehension. For a shared reading activity, I would use the book in its revised version (see below) to accommodate the needs of the students. According to the WIDA Can Do Descriptors, students on expanding levels are able to identify main ideas and details in illustrated texts. The focus of the activity would be understanding characters in a story and choosing words from the text to describe them and their actions. The content objective would be “I can describe how characters respond to major events and challenges.”. The language objective would be “I can discuss how characters acted in the story by choosing key words from the text to describe character’s actions and responses to the events in the story.”. Before reading the story, I would go over a list of character traits with visuals we have previously discussed and preview vocabulary words in the book using their definitions. As I read the illustrated story presented on the Google Slides, the students and I would make a list of words that students can then choose and use as details to describe how characters respond to the challenges in the story, a strategy called vocabulary selection (SIOP® 8 Components and 30 features, 2022). Here are the words I would expect for children to notice and inquire about as they look and listen to the story: hoped, very carefully, couldn’t wait, worried, transferred, ashamed, best he could do, worthy, impossible, courage, reward. After reading the story aloud, I would ask the following moderately challenging questions to guide students in their comprehension of details about characters’ actions with the purpose to achieve the lessons’ objectives and help students understand the lesson in the story: What is the major event or challenge in the story? What did Ping do to make the seed grow? In the end, why did Ping bring an empty pot to the emperor? How were the other children able to grow their flowers? What do you think about Ping and what words can you use to describe him? How can you describe other children in the story? What do you think this story teaches us?”

Book Redesign:

As far as the text goes, I would add Chinese translation on each page to promote greater understanding for ELLs with Chinese background.  This text can be used to reinforce understanding of emotions, and even though illustrations of character’s emotions mostly match the text, readers would have to look closely at the expressions on the characters’ faces.  For this reason, I would make illustrations bigger so the character’s emotions are much more visible.  I would also make an emphasis on the words that help to highlight the main character’s persistence and convey the lesson in the story.  I would make the advanced words stand out by making them bold, in a different color, and using a bigger font.  I would also add insets with definitions and visuals on some pages of the book to help ELLs understand the meaning of advanced words like tend and successor among other words.  See below.

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“Bread, Bread, Bread,” by Ann Morris & Touro University TESOL Candidate Melissa Greenfield’s Material Critique and Redesign for EDPN 673

For EDPN 673 Methods and Materials for Teaching English as a Second Language. This course provides a historical overview of second language acquisition theories and teaching methods. Students learn how to apply current approaches, methods and techniques, with attention to the effective use of materials, in teaching English as a second language. Students will engage in the planning and implementation of standards-based ESL instruction which includes differentiated learning experiences geared to students’ needs. Emphasis is placed on creating culturally responsive learning environments. Includes 15 hours of field work.

Touro TESOL candidates submit a Materials Critique & Redesign where candidates (1) prepare a written critique description of the material or resource, analyzing its effectiveness for ELLs and (2) based on your analysis, redesign one section/activity of the original material so that it meets the need of ELLs. The materials chosen will promote culturally and linguistically responsive classrooms and instructional practices.

Melissa Greenfield

Melissa Greenfield works as a first grade teacher on Long Island. She is committed creating classroom environment where students feel safe, confident and excited to learn. She holds an initial certification in Elementary ed. (1-6) from SUNY Old Westbury and is working towards a MS in TESOL at Touro.

ELLs with limited experience with the non-fiction genre may be confused by the text structure presented in Bread, Bread, Bread. Instruction at the primary level uses a lot of fiction texts, where students have learned to look for characters, settings and other story elements within a book. It can be challenging at first for some students to move from fiction to nonfiction texts because these books are just used less commonly in our classroom. To refamiliarize students with nonfiction before reading Bread, Bread, Bread, the teacher should remind students of the differences in the genres, pointing out that there are photographs rather than illustrations, and explaining that the author’s purpose for writing this book was to inform.

Melissa Greenfield, Touro University TESOL Candidate
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‘How to Make Pizza,’ a SIOP Lesson Plan by Touro University TESOL Candidate Kelly Broshear for EDDN 637

“Now that I have taken this course, I have learned invaluable methods to help make the content comprehensible for all students, but even more-so for my ELL students.” Kelly Broshear, Touro University TESOL Candidate

EDDN 637 Second Language Learners and the Content Areas: Students will become acquainted with and practice effective approaches, methods, and strategies for teaching and evaluating English language learners in the content areas (ELA, social studies, math and science). Throughout the course, students will explore the impact of culture and language on classroom learning. Special challenges in teaching and assessment in each content area will also be discussed. Includes 15 hours of field work.

Context and Overview: Teacher candidates are required to design a sheltered instruction lesson following the Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP) Model is a research-based and validated instructional model that has proven effective in addressing the academic needs of English learners throughout the United States. Candidates need to explain how and why they’ve decided on the specific lesson content and language needs to be addressed. Activities should focus on assessing student needs before, during and upon lesson completion to enhance future instructional planning.

Touro University TESOL Candidate Kelly Broshear: “I am a student at Touro College as a member of the TESOL masters program. I received my undergraduate degree at Salve Regina University in Newport RI in 2019 with a major in early childhood education. At Salve Regina University, I found a passion for working with ENL students. My current career is a kindergarten teacher for the NYC DOE in District 27 with the hope to eventually assume a role as an ESL specialist.”

This is the second time I written a SIOP lesson, however, this was the first time I have used this specific SIOP template. One thing I find to be difficult when writing a SIOP lesson plan is determining where every aspect of a lesson plan belongs. I found myself feeling that I was repeating myself often throughout the lesson plan. This is a lesson that I have taught with my students prior to making this lesson, but I had never written out a formal plan to go along with it until now. With that being said, it was interesting to try and reflect upon how I had taught the lesson compared to this plan I wrote now because I realized how many things that I should have done in the lesson when I taught it. When I taught this lesson, I had not considered specific ways to make content more comprehensible, I just taught it because it was part of the curriculum. Now that I have taken this course, I have learned invaluable methods to help make the content comprehensible for all students, but even more-so for my ELL students.

Kelly Broshear, Touro University TESOL Candidate
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“A Night out With Mama” by Quvenzhane Wallis & Touro University TESOL Candidate Jessica Cruz’ Material Critique and Redesign for EDPN 673

For EDPN 673 Methods and Materials for Teaching English as a Second Language. This course provides a historical overview of second language acquisition theories and teaching methods. Students learn how to apply current approaches, methods and techniques, with attention to the effective use of materials, in teaching English as a second language. Students will engage in the planning and implementation of standards-based ESL instruction which includes differentiated learning experiences geared to students’ needs. Emphasis is placed on creating culturally responsive learning environments. Includes 15 hours of field work.

Touro TESOL candidates submit a Materials Critique & Redesign where candidates (1) prepare a written critique description of the material or resource, analyzing its effectiveness for ELLs and (2) based on your analysis, redesign one section/activity of the original material so that it meets the need of ELLs. The materials chosen will promote culturally and linguistically responsive classrooms and instructional practices.

Jessica Cruz is proud to serve as a First Grade Bilingual teacher on Long Island. She holds a Bachelors Degree and is currently pursuing her Masters in TESOL at Touro University. Ms. Cruz shared, “I have a true passion and am proud to be able to work with English Language Learners. Working with ELLs gives me the opportunity to teach my language and my culture.”

I took into inconsideration my First Grade Bilingual class. The majority of students come from Central America and have no prior schooling from their home country. I chose to critique three children’s books that I frequently use as read-alouds in my classroom.

Jessica Cruz, Touro University TESOL Candidate
Jessica Cruz redesign “A Night out with Mama” by Quvenzhane Wallis
Jessica Cruz, redesign: Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? By Bill Martin Jr and Eric Carle
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Hyperlinked Internet Repositories & Resources for Educators Infographic by Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin

There is a plethora of Internet Repositories & Resources available for educators. Yet, curating, vetting and keeping track of all the valuable repositories and resources is a hurdle. This is why I created my Hyperlinked Internet Repositories & Resources for Educators PDF. I hope this resource proofs useful to my peers and colleagues. Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin

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Touro University TESOL Candidate Meghan Schick’s “A Long Walk to Water” Project

For EDPN 673 Methods and Materials for Teaching English as a Second Language. This course provides a historical overview of second language acquisition theories and teaching methods. Students learn how to apply current approaches, methods and techniques, with attention to the effective use of materials, in teaching English as a second language. Students will engage in the planning and implementation of standards-based ESL instruction which includes differentiated learning experiences geared to students’ needs. Emphasis is placed on creating culturally responsive learning environments. Includes 15 hours of field work.

Touro TESOL candidates submit a Materials Critique & Redesign where candidates (1) prepare a written critique description of the material or resource, analyzing its effectiveness for ELLs and (2) based on your analysis, redesign one section/activity of the original material so that it meets the need of ELLs. The materials chosen will promote culturally and linguistically responsive classrooms and instructional practices.

Meghan Schick is a graduate student in the Touro University Masters of Education TESOL program.

This assignment helped me learn more the importance of choosing the right book for our students. As a teacher who works with the younger elementary grades, I think it is crucial to understand how to choose appropriate books that our students can comprehend. For this assignment, I focused on secondary education to familiarize myself with the texts use for students. Although I teach elementary school students, I feel that I have learned a lot of valuable information when critiquing and redesigning the text “A Long Walk to Water.”

Meghan Schick, graduate student Touro University TESOL/BLE program
Meghan Schick, Touro University TESOL Candidate
Meghan Schick, Touro University TESOL Candidate

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Touro University TESOL Candidate Carolyn Ciccarello’s Method Presentation for EDPN 673

EDPN 673 Methods and Materials for Teaching English as a Second Language

This course provides a historical overview of second language acquisition theories and teaching methods. Students learn how to apply current approaches, methods and techniques, with attention to the effective use of materials, in teaching English as a second language. Students will engage in the planning and implementation of standards-based ESL instruction which includes differentiated learning experiences geared to students’ needs. Emphasis is placed on creating culturally responsive learning environments. Includes 15 hours of field work.

The assignment for EDPN 673,was for Teacher candidates (TCs) will plan, record on video teaching a brief mini- lesson to a specific ENL audience in a specifically designed approach to language learning found in the Richards and Rodgers text, i.e. Communicative Language Learning, Total Physical Response etc. Candidates will first introduce their assigned method including the general approach, syllabus and other aspects, they will then demonstrate their mini lesson they planned online through PPT, video and upload all the artifacts plus a paper submission of no more than 2 pages excluding references. 1.5 line spacing normal margins. New York times or similar font. Any content area can be selected to demonstrate the lesson such as PowerPoint, materials, and realia.

Part 1 – Video, Part 2 – PPT, Part 3 – paper explaining the mini lesson.

I am pleased to feature:

Touro University TESOL Candidate Carolyn Ciccarello received her Bachelor’s degree in Childhood/Special Education from Suny Old Westbury, Long Island. She is pursuing pursuing a Master’s degree in TESOL at Touro University. She lives in Brooklyn and currently works as a Special Education Consultant teacher on Long Island.


Carolyn Ciccarello’s Method Presentation Video

For my video presentation, I chose to focus on the practice/application section of the lesson using the direct method and the communicative language teaching approach (CLT). I believe that combining the direct method and CLT approach will be beneficial for students for several reasons. For the direct method, I incorporate vocabulary words in which I use pictures so students could make meaningful connections and I provide examples of how each word can be used in a sentence. Richards & Roger (2014) points out that through the direct method “Knowing words could be used to teach new vocabulary, using mime, demonstration, and pictures” (p. 9). Teaching new vocabulary to students increases their vocabulary and verbal skills so they can choose more precise words when communicating with others.

Carolyn Ciccarello, Touro University TESOL Candidate

Method Presentation Google Slides Link: Carolyn Ciccarello’s Slide Presentation for Method’s Presentation

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Touro University TESOL Candidates Victoriaann Irace and Cristina Talarico Mindmaps for Teaching to Multiple Intelligences for EDPN 671

For a EDPN 671 EDPN 671 Theory and Practice of Bilingual and Multicultural Education discussion board I wanted Touro University TESOL Candidates talk about multiple intelligences. “After reading and viewing the materials for this week, create a mindmap your own ideas and strategies using the framework of multiple intelligences. To think about when mapping: Where do you think you fall within the scheme of multiple intelligences? How can understanding these concepts improve your own teaching? How do these concepts apply to ELLs?Ensure that you are creating a thoughtful, significant mindmap.” Below two meaningful, well-designed mindmaps submitted by Touro University TESOL Candidates

Victoriaann Irace received her bachelors in child study from Saint Joseph’s University in Patchogue New York. She is currently certified in Early Childhood Education, Childhood Education and Students with Disabilities (Birth- Grade 2 & Grades 1-6). She is currently enrolled in a program at Touro for her Masters in TESOL. She will be entering her third year as a substitute elementary teacher for Longwood School District in September 2022. Vicky has spent her entire adult life working with children and possesses a passion regarding teaching our future generations.

Touro University TESOL Candidate Victoriaann Irace’s Mindmap

Touro University TESOL Candidate Cristina Talarico, Mind Map
Understanding the theory of multiple intelligences can improve my teaching because I can use this theory to determine the best ways that my students can learn in my classroom. Each student has one kind of intelligence that they perform the best at, so I can use their strengths and weaknesses to guide my lessons. I can include particular types of intelligence to help my students stay engaged and succeed in the classroom. Individualizing lessons and including the theory of multiple intelligences to guide your teaching will lead to success. These concepts can apply to ELLs because not every ELL will learn the same way, it is good to include a variety of factors from multiple intelligences to understand how the student works best.

References

Edutopia. (2010, July 9). Howard Gardner on multiple intelligences. YouTube. Retrieved July 19, 2022, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iYgO8jZTFuQ

Nieto, S., & Bode, P. (2018). Affirming diversity: The sociopolitical context of multicultural education. Pearson.

Understanding the theory of multiple intelligences can improve my teaching because I can use this theory to determine the best ways that my students can learn in my classroom.

Touro University TESOL Candidate Cristina Talarico
Touro University TESOL Candidate Cristina Talarico
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Touro University TESOL candidate Victoriaann Irace’s Method Presentation for EDPN 673 Methods and Materials for Teaching English as a Second Language

EDPN 673 Methods and Materials for Teaching English as a Second Language

This course provides a historical overview of second language acquisition theories and teaching methods. Students learn how to apply current approaches, methods and techniques, with attention to the effective use of materials, in teaching English as a second language. Students will engage in the planning and implementation of standards-based ESL instruction which includes differentiated learning experiences geared to students’ needs. Emphasis is placed on creating culturally responsive learning environments. Includes 15 hours of field work.

Teacher candidates (TCs) will plan, record on video teaching a brief mini- lesson to a specific ENL audience in a specifically designed approach to language learning found in the Richards and Rodgers text, i.e. Communicative Language Learning, Total Physical Response etc. Candidates will first introduce their assigned method including the general approach, syllabus and other aspects, they will then demonstrate their mini lesson they planned online through PPT, video and upload all the artifacts plus a paper submission.

Vicky Irace received her bachelors in child study from Saint Joseph’s University in Patchogue New York. She is currently certified in Early Childhood Education, Childhood Education and Students with Disabilities (Birth- Grade 2 & Grades 1-6). She is currently enrolled in a program at Touro for her Masters in TESOL. She will be entering her third year as a substitute elementary teacher for Longwood School District in September 2022. Vicky has spent her entire adult life working with children and possesses a passion regarding teaching our future generations.

The words being introduced in this lesson relate to the children’s every day in two parts. One is social conversations with peers, pertaining to the weather for example. The other is that in the preceding science units several of these terms will come up with regularity and building the ELLs knowledge of these words enhances their ability to comprehend the language and the content in the classroom.

Victoriaann Irace, Touro University TESOL candidate

Victoriaann Irace Method Presentation Video

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Touro University TESOL Teacher Candidate Kate Yanovich’s Method Presentation for Methods and Materials for Teaching English as a Second Language (EDPN-673) Summer 2022

The assignment was for teacher candidates (TCs) for Methods and Materials for Teaching English as a Second Language (EDPN-673) Summer 2022 to plan, record on video teaching a brief mini- lesson to a specific ENL audience in a specifically designed approach to language learning found in the Richards and Rodgers text, i.e. Communicative Language Learning, Total Physical Response etc. Candidates will first introduce their assigned method including the general approach, syllabus and other aspects, they will then demonstrate their mini lesson they planned online through PPT, video and upload all the artifacts plus a paper submission of no more than 2 pages excluding references. 1.5 line spacing normal margins. New York times or similar font. Any content area can be selected to demonstrate the lesson such as PowerPoint, materials, and realia. Part 1 – Video, Part 2 – PPT, Part 3 – paper explaining the mini lesson.

Below the infographic I designed for the methods presentation:

Kate Yanovich works as a New Yok city public school elementary teacher. She was born and raised in Kishinev, Moldova in Eastern Europe. Her native language is Russian and she has lived in Brooklyn, New York, for the past 28 years. She earned her Bachelor’s degree in English with a minor in Journalism from Brooklyn College. After some time tutoring writing, math, and conflict resolution skills to students in after-school programs, she realized her passion for teaching and returned to Brooklyn College where she obtained her Master’s degree in Early Childhood and Childhood Education. Kate Yanovich shares that she has “…taught students of different ages, ranging from Pre-K to middle school, and having a background in special education. I also worked with students and young adults with special needs. I have a great love for children and a passion for enabling their abilities and potential for a bright future. Currently, I am pursuing the TESOL Graduate degree at Touro College and look forward to working more closely with second language and multilingual learners in their educational journeys. “

Kate Yanovich’s Method Presentation Video

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1hJRtOmq1kOCJfNnhF47AD74LqyyJQaZD/view

I believe in the kind of teaching that promotes children’s curiosity for learning and develops creativity, independence, and new discoveries. I enjoy working with parents as they are an equal partner and play an integral part in supporting their children’s education and social-emotional development.

Kate Yanovich, Touro University TESOL teacher candidate

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Touro University TESOL Candidates Kelly Broshears and Joanna Liriano ‘s Mindmaps on Comprehensible Input

For a Discussion Board in EDDN 637 EDDN 637 Second Language Learners and the Content Areas the weekly contribution was constructing a mindmap of comprehensible input strategies and connecting the input strategies to teaching strategies. As their Professor, there is much pride to see such excellent work by my candidates.

Touro University TESOL Candidate Joanna Liriano

Joanna Liriano is a math teacher and track & field coach in South Bronx. She served the Peace Corps in Mozambique and Teach for America in NYC. Currently, she is working on her bilingual certification in Spanish, Portuguese, and French to meet the needs of her students.

Touro University TESOL Candidate Kristi Mattina

Kristi Mattina holds a Bachelor’s degree in Childhood Education and a Master’s in Special Education. In June, she completes her 11th year of employment with the NYCDOE. She is a Special Education teacher and taught in ICT and 12:1+1 settings in District 31. She also enjoys spending time with her family and two young children.

Featured

Dr. Jasmin Cowin publishes ‘A Chain of Worlds: Education in the Age of Metaverses’ with the virtual 26th World Multi-Conference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics: WMSCI 2022, July 12 – 15, 2022

Introducing AI and intelligent systems into education will have profound effects on not only assessment and administrative functions but also on faculty and learner motivation, engagement, and overall academic performance. Other areas affected will be organizational strategic planning, student acquisition, and retention, curriculum design and Personal Learning Networks.

Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin, A Chain of Worlds: Education in the Age of Metaverses. The 26th World Multi-Conference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics: WMSCI 2022, July 12 – 15, 2022 IMSCI 2022, vol. 3, 25-30. https://doi.org/10.54808/WMSCI2022.03 ISBN: 978-1-950492-66-4 (Volume III)

Cowin, J. (2022). A Chain of Worlds: Education in the Age of Metaverses. The 26th World Multi-Conference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics: WMSCI 2022, July 12 – 15, 2022  IMSCI 2022, vol. 3, 25-30. https://doi.org/10.54808/WMSCI2022.03  ISBN: 978-1-950492-66-4 (Volume III)

Featured

Touro University TESOL Candidate Adah Hirschfeld’s Infographic on the Dewey Decimal System in English, Spanish, Ukrainian and Haitian Creole

The opportunity to do this assignment and try out the Canva program was truly invaluable. I will be making many more and also introducing the app to my students as a possible research end product.

Adah Hirschfeld, Touro University TESOL Candidate

For EDPN 673 Methods and Materials for Teaching English as a Second Language TESOL candidates create an infographic.

Assignment Description: For this assignment, you will create an infographic for a specific group of learners (your audience). It is highly recommended that you create your infographic for the learners that you are currently teaching, or typically teach. You will know more about this group than other groups of learners, and are likely to have an easier time designing instruction for them. Integrating the infographic into one of the SIOP lessons is recommended.

Your project will be assessed on the following: Content: content is specifically tailored to ENL/ESL students for a specific grade level.
Focus: All content (visual and textual) concisely complements the purpose of the infographic.
Visual Appeal: Fonts, colors, layouts, & visual elements meaningfully contribute to the infographic’s ability to convey the overall message.
Argument: The infographic effectively informs and convinces the reader of its intended purpose.
Organization: Information is systematically organized and supports readers’ comprehension of the main message.
Citation: Full bibliographic citations are included for all sources referenced
Mechanics: The infographic is free of spelling or grammatical errors.

Adah Hirschfeld is a New York City Public School librarian who currently works at IS 240 in Midwood, Brooklyn.  She holds a Master of Library and Information Science degree from Pratt Institute and a Master’s degree in School Administration from Touro College.  She is pursuing certification in TESOL to better meet the language and literacy needs of her students.

The Dewey Decimal System in English, Spanish, Ukrainian and Haitian Creole.

  1. WHY are you designing this infographic?

I wanted to make this to post in the library so students will be able to find the categories of non-fiction books easily.  I give an orientation to all the new 6th grade classes in the fall and try to encourage and foster skill and provide materials that will make my students independent library users.

  • HOW will this infographic serve MLs?

English, Spanish and Haitian Creole are the dominant languages in my middle school in Flatbush / Midwood, Brooklyn.  I added Ukrainian because we had an influx of students when the conflict started and will have more Ukrainian speaking students in September.

  • WHAT are you trying to point out, teach, focus on, or reinforce?

Non-fiction books in the library are organized and shelved according to categories or subjects. Students need to know where to find books to help them with their research or reading interests.  The dewey decimal system also reinforces math skills and helps students become aware that many academic terms such as decimal can be used across subjects.

  • WHICH language production is this infographic focusing on?

This infographic is focused on reading, but may lead to speaking discussion when explaining the system or sending students to find specific dewey numbers on the shelves.

  • WHERE in your lesson plan will YOU be able to use this infographic?

This infographic can be used in the mini lesson.  It can also be used for independent practice with a worksheet matching Dewey call numbers to subject headings / categories.

Featured

Touro University TESOL Candidate Melissa Greenfield on Tools and Techniques for Effective Second Language/Foreign Language Teaching for EDPN 673

EDPN 673 Methods and Materials for Teaching English as a Second Language

This course provides a historical overview of second language acquisition theories and teaching methods. Students learn how to apply current approaches, methods and techniques, with attention to the effective use of materials, in teaching English as a second language. Students will engage in the planning and implementation of standards-based ESL instruction which includes differentiated learning experiences geared to students’ needs. Emphasis is placed on creating culturally responsive learning environments. Includes 15 hours of field work.

Touro University TESOL Candidate Melissa Greenfield is a first grade teacher on Long Island and committed  “to making my classroom a place where students feel safe, confident and excited to learn.” She holds an initial certification in Elementary ed. (1-6) from SUNY Old Westbury and is working towards a MS in TESOL at Touro. 

Ms. Greenfield wrote an exceptional DB 3 contribution, featuring strong analysis and a reflection on her classroom activity sequencing.

Featured

Dr. Cowin presents on “Simulation Training, Teacher Performance, Assessment and Artificial Intelligence” at the English Language Centre, International English Language Teaching Symposium (IELTS-2022), “Pathways, Paradigms and Possibilities (PPP) in ELT,” Oman

Abstract

Teacher education programs require pathways for teacher performance assessment supporting ELT candidates completing practicum and fieldwork hours. This presentation focuses on reviewing, contrasting, and framing two distinct immersive ecosystems. Mursion and simSchool. Either platform offers immersive experiences simSchool is AI-driven while Mursion employs mixed-reality simulations. Both provide ELT teachers a platform to practice and hone the art and skill of teaching within a simulation using avatars through customized and personalized clinical experiences for language teaching.

Description

This workshop took deep dive into two very distinct teacher simulation training platforms: simSchool and Mursion. By comparing and contrasting the platforms’ respective approaches to simulation training workshop attendees be introduced to simulation-based learning and emotionally intelligent student avatar. This presentation identified, summarized, and reflected through showcasing each platforms teaching and simulation scenarios. In addition, simulation teacher performance assessment generates data. Such data aggregation offers institutions informed decision-making teacher performance through systematic reviews using data and technology to improve their language teacher education programs.

Featured

Touro University, GSE, TESOL Candidate Kelly Broshears on Academic Success for Multilingual Learners for EDDN 637

It is always a pleasure to feature exception candidate work. TESOL Candidate Kelly Broshears contributed an exceptional Discussion Board on Academic Success for Multilingual Learners for EDDN 637 – Second Language Learners and the Content Areas

In order to provide the most effective teaching, it is crucial that teachers of ELL students work off of what the student can already do and build upon their strengths. It is so often that educators work off of what students do not know and they focus on that negativity, instead of focusing on the positives of what students can already do and use that to their advantage. The assets being referred to also do not necessarily have to be academically based. According to Echevarria, et.al (2017), “these assets are related to language and cultural practices in the home… Teachers can build on these relationship roles to construct collaborative learning environments in the classroom.” (p. 7). By building off the strengths of the students, the teacher can create a more inclusive environment for students that makes all students feel like they can be successful and helps to provide the confidence they need to succeed.

Kelly Broshears, Touro University, GSE, TESOL Candidate

Kelly Broshears is a 4th semester student at Touro College and a member of the TESOL masters program. She received her undergraduate degree at Salve Regina University in Newport RI in 2019 with a major in early childhood education. “This is where I found a passion for working with ENL students. Currently, I am a kindergarten teacher for the NYC DOE in District 27.”

 Discussion Board: 1 CHAP I ACADEMIC SUCCESS by Echevarria, J., Vogt, M. & Short, D. (2017). Making Content Comprehensible for English Learners: The SIOP Model. 5th Edition, Pearson.

Kelly Broshears:

  1. WHAT Characteristics  INFLUENCE ELL’s having SUCCESS IN SCHOOL? 

The success of an ELL student in school can be connected to a variety of factors. There are the ones that I think of right off the bat that include the student’s prior exposure to the English language before attending school or the years the ELL student has been attending an English speaking school. However, research suggests that the characteristics that influence the school success of an ENL student goes much deeper than that. As stated earlier, knowledge of the English language is a main characteristic of student success. Another characteristic includes how deep the language proficiency is in the L1, as well as, the educational background of the student. For example, a student who is well educated in the L1 typically will have an easier time learning the L2 compared to a student who had limited access to school due to factors outside of the control of the child. If a student is more proficient in their L1 and has had more access to school in their native language, “they can transfer the knowledge they learned in their native country’s schools to the courses they are taking in the United States.” (Echevarria, Vogt & Short, 2017, p. 5) which, in turn, will more likely produce success. ELL success can also be determined on factors outside of the education realm. Some factors may include the family’s financial situation, abuse, refugee status from a potentially war-torn country, etc. As teachers of ELL students, it is incredibly important to recognize and acknowledge these characteristics when planning the best possible instruction for the individual students you work with.

2. What are some characteristics of ELL’s to consider to implement effective teaching? 

As previously stated, there are so many characteristics of ELL’s that are important to consider when teaching. In order for the instruction to be effective, these characteristics must be considered. In order to provide the most effective teaching, it is crucial that teachers of ELL students work off of what the student can already do and build upon their strengths. It is so often that educators work off of what students do not know and they focus on that negativity, instead of focusing on the positives of what students can already do and use that to their advantage. The assets being referred to also do not necessarily have to be academically based. According to Echevarria, et.al (2017), “these assets are related to language and cultural practices in the home… Teachers can build on these relationship roles to construct collaborative learning environments in the classroom.” (p. 7). By building off the strengths of the students, the teacher can create a more inclusive environment for students that makes all students feel like they can be successful and helps to provide the confidence they need to succeed.

You can also use student educational backgrounds in their native languages to help implement effective teaching. Teachers can build upon the literacy skills students may have in their L1 and work off of that to transfer those skills to English. This can be done through making connections from school to their outside world by looking at various things to read like a bill or a shopping list. You can also foster effective teaching by providing many opportunities for students to use conversational English. Lastly, in order to implement effective teaching it is crucial to have students make connections to their cultures because “students do not enter schools as blank slates. Many have had life experiences that are pertinent to the curricula.” (Echevarria, Vogt & Short, 2017, p. 8). By providing children with those connections to their cultures, it can give students a chance to show their knowledge, build their confidence, and they can teach their peers while learning how the things in their native countries might be different than in the United States.

3. How can we as educators transform the education of English Language Learners/ Multilingual Learners for  tomorrow’s world?

The key to transforming the education of ELL’s and ML’s for tomorrow’s world is multimodal learning. ELL students who are filling in quick and mindless worksheets are not being engaged enough and set up for success in the future. Students will need to be cognitively ready for purposeful and substantive conversations and interactions they will be having in the near future. It is an educator’s job to set these students up for this kind of success, but so often, these students are falling through the cracks because of teacher activities like simple worksheets. According to Walqui (2021), students “need to be skilled in understanding ideas, judging their validity based on evidence, and often making decisions based on inferential interpretations of the ideas and information presented in the narrative or written texts they encounter.” By providing ELL/ ML students with an opportunity to engage with text in various modalities and engage with a peer about the text, the students are then able to practice forming their own understanding and perspective on the topic, as well as, listen to and gain a peer’s perspective. Because ELL students have so much cultural knowledge to build upon that teachers can tap into, students should be well equipped to engage with others and learn from their peers. In order to transform education, we need to include these types of rich and engaging practices that will prove to be more effective in preparing students for the future than a worksheet.

4. What is one take-away from this week’s readings and how might it impact you teaching?

In my opinion, I learned a lot from this week’s reading and it was really eye opening. The biggest take-away I had from the reading is how important it is to build relationships in the classroom and be culturally responsive. I always heard professors talk about how important culturally responsive teaching is but after reading several articles and the text it is even more clear how important this is. For example, an ELL teacher in Oregon engages in home visits and pays special attention to important aspects of her students home lives so she can include these aspects into her lessons to make them more engaging and to make children have a sense of community. “Students are most engaged when they feel a personal connection to a lesson or unit, a connection that’s created in part by a teacher’s investment in culturally competent relationships.” (Kaplan, 2019). By considering all factors of an ELL students life and taking into account all of their strengths and interests, it is more likely that these students will have more success in school because the teacher is setting them up for that success with the environment he/she has cultivated.

References:

Echevarria, J., Vogt, M. & Short, D. (2017). Making Content Comprehensible for English Learners: The SIOP Model. 5th Edition, Pearson.

Kaplan, E. (2019, April 12). 6 Essential Strategies for Teaching English Language Learners. Edutopia. https://www.edutopia.org/article/6-essential-strategies-teaching-english-language-learners (Links to an external site.)

Walqui, A. (2021, January 5). Quality Education for ELLs and MLs: Why We Need It and How We Can Achieve It. NYSED. http://www.nysed.gov/bilingual-ed/topic-brief-1-quality-education-ells-and-mls-why-we-need-it-and-how-we-can-achieve-it (Links to an external site.)

from DB 1 CHAP I ACADEMIC SUCCESS

Kelly Broshears responding to peers:

Hi M., 

I really enjoyed reading your post this week and I felt like a lot of the things you mentioned resonated deeply with me and my reading this week as well. One thing that you mentioned that stood out to me was when you said about “Creating activities that sharpen all five senses and allow students to work in an interactive format will help them gain a greater understanding of both the English language and the world around them.” This jumped out to me because as a kindergarten teacher, this is the only way we really teach because it is proven that young children need that hands on and multimodal learning to help grasp new concepts. However, I know that as you go on in the years of schooling, hands on learning turns more into worksheets and textbooks which can be detrimental for an ENL student. I worry about these students because I feel that with so many teachers not having ENL training, they do not know how to differentiate for these students. This can cause these students to get lost in the shuffle. In my opinion, teachers who are struggling with teaching their ENL students should think about this: “Educators considering how to strengthen the quality of teaching for ELLs and MLs will find it provocative and productive to reflect on their own and other experts’ theories concerning how second languages are learned, how learning happens in general, what students bring to learning, and how teachers themselves learn and develop as expert professionals.” (Walqui, 2021). By reflecting and studying the theory and pedagogy behind teaching ENL students, most teachers can begin to shift their thinking and improve their practice. 

Reference:

Walqui, A. (2021, January 5). Quality Education for ELLs and MLs: Why We Need It and How We Can Achieve It. NYSED. http://www.nysed.gov/bilingual-ed/topic-brief-1-quality-education-ells-and-mls-why-we-need-it-and-how-we-can-achieve-it 

Hi L., 

I wanted to let you know that I thought your post this week was really great and I look forward to hearing your perspective throughout this course. As someone who is dual language, I think you bring a whole other side to this apart from just the teaching side that is interesting to hear. Something that you said really stood out to me. What stood out to me was when you mentioned overcrowded classrooms being an ineffective way to teach ENL students. Currently, I teach general education kindergarten and have 24 students in the room with no aide or paraprofessional. This is almost the maximum amount of students the NYC DOE allows in a kindergarten setting. I always say that this puts my students at a huge disadvantage since it becomes very loud at times and overstimulating, but this is true especially for the ENL students I have. I never thought about them potentially struggling more because of the setting so thank you for pointing that out. In a big school system like the DOE, unfortunately there is nothing we can do about the class sizes no matter how hard we fight for it. However, I really enjoyed the suggestion by Schwartz (2021), that said to use microphones in the classroom to combat this issue. She says that using a microphone “can help ELL students hear the nuances of your voice more clearly and understand you better”. This might help ENL students in a large classroom to understand different aspects of the language more clearly. 

Reference:

Schwartz, J. (2021, October 21). 10 strategies that support English language learners across all subjects. Edutopia. Retrieved June 9, 2022, from https://www.edutopia.org/article/10-strategies-support-english-language-learners-across-all-subjects  (Links to an external site.) 

Featured

Dr. Cowin at GSENN 2022 on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: A Multidisciplinary Teaching Frontier

GSENN2022 aims to bring together the renowned researchers, scientists and scholars to exchange ideas, to present sophisticated research works and to discuss hot topics in the field and share their experiences on all aspects of Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials.

The GSENN2022,a 3 day event, gathered the key players of the Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials community and related sectors. This event was launched with the aim to become an established event, attracting global participants, intent on sharing, exchanging and exploring new avenues of Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials, Catalysis and Surface Process, Smart Graphene Materials, Nanoparticle enhanced spectroscopy, Nanotechnology Risk & Safety, Nanoscale structures for solar energy.

Abstract:

As part of the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR), the multi-disciplinary fields of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology hold the promise to profoundly change the way humanity lives, works and relates to one another.  Nanoscience education, a multidisciplinary field, integrates diverse subjects such as surface science, electronics, organic chemistry, molecular biology, semiconductor physics, medicine, energy storage, engineering, microfabrication, molecular engineering, and more.  Molecular sciences are poised to become a gateway to the future, promising advances from medical diagnostics to climate change. While there are nanoscience research centers such as the NSF Nanoscale Science and Engineering Networks, Materials Research Science and Engineering Centers (MRSECs), National Nanomanufacturing Networks, few educational programs exist locally and globally spanning across the full spectrum of educational levels from K–12 to postgraduate studies. Corporations, educational institutions, and education ministries alike are exploring frameworks and technological tools to facilitate STEM learning in schools and beyond. App innovation and gamification, digital literacy, VR and AR, SDP, and collaborative learning are leading educational trends in the 4IR. One characteristic that these new learning technologies share is that by enabling real-time behavior modification, knowledge transfer and learning can occur simultaneously. “The AI challenge is not just about educating more AI and computer experts, although that is important. It is also about building skills that AI cannot emulate. These are essential human skills such as teamwork, leadership, listening, staying positive, dealing with people and managing crises and conflict” [Owen, 2017: para. 2]. The US Department of Education’s mission statement focuses on promoting “student achievement and preparation for global competitiveness by fostering educational excellence and ensuring equal access” [US Department of Education, 2021].

Nanoscience and nanotechnology will change interpreting the world and reshape educational philosophies while altering the pedagogies that underlie them.  Economic growth, the durability of society, and sustainability for the 21st century and beyond need to be supported through a system of education that can anticipate societal and global changes.  Therefore, it will be necessary to transform the modes of delivery which are part of the operations of educational institutions worldwide. Looking forward, corporations, educational institutions, and countries must extend the scope of their collective educational ambitions beyond classic declarative learner knowledge to the nurturing of the complex and creative processes of learners, coupled with digital literacy in the fields of nanoscience and nanotechnology.

This presentation focuses on cross-curricular learning models, virtual and augmented reality labs, professional teacher development, and free educational resources aimed at promoting student awareness of nanoscience and nanotechnology as well as provide advanced learning and skills development.

Keywords: Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, educational transformation, pedagogical frameworks, 21st-century education, Fourth Industrial Revolution, Augment and Virtual reality Labs

References

Featured

The CALL- IS Newsletter is currently accepting submissions for the Summer/ Fall 2022 edition

As a member of the CALL-IS Steering Committee, I am pleased to announce that the CALL- IS Newsletter is currently accepting submissions for the Summer/ Fall 2022 edition. We are looking for letters, articles, snapshots and book reviews relevant to CALL.  If you need a book recommendation, please inquire .   Submissions are due by June 31, 2022. Send submissions to ludry@dwci.edu .

 Submission Guidelines:

  • Letters/ Articles
    • 1000 – 1,750 words 
    • have the title in ALL CAPS
    • list a byline: author’s name with embedded email, affiliation, city, and country
    • include a 50-word teaser for the Newsletter Homepage
    • contain no more than five citations
    • include a 2-to-3 sentence author biography and author photo
    • follow the style guidelines in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th edition (APA style)
    • be in .doc, .docx, .rtf, or .txt format
    • All figures, graphs, and other images should be labeled and sent as separate jpg files.
    • Book Reviews 
      • 650 – 1000 words in length
      • include a 50-word teaser for the Newsletter Homepage
      • include a 2-3 sentence reviewer biography and reviewer photo
      • follow the style guidelines in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, Sixth Edition (APA Style)
      • be .doc or .docx, .rtf, or .txt format
      • All figures, graphs, and other images should be labeled and sent as separate jpg files.

    Deadlines: Submissions are due by June 31, 2022. Please send submissions to ludry@dwci.edu .

    AND Are You looking for an exciting opportunity for Professional Development? Why not become CALL-IS Newsletter Editor or join the CALL-IS Newsletter Editing Team. Contact Larry Udry (ludry@dwci.edu) for details. Back issues of our newsletter can be found at http://newsmanager.commpartners.com/tesolcallis/issues/

    Featured

    Visualization of Education Strategies to Support Students’ Well-Being and Academic Excellence

    The last few weeks I reflected on several questions.

    1. How can educators support and nurture students’ well-being and academic excellence?
    2. What are student needs and educators responsibilities?
    3. Where do experiences and needs of both educators and students overlap?

    In this infographic, I juxtaposed students and educators and connected their perspectives and common needs within multiple contexts. The PDF has links to resources for educators wishing to explore the topics.

    Featured

    Computers For Schools Burundi:Kuvumbura Bishasha, Uvumbuzi, Innovation

    Emmanuel Ngendakuriyo, Founder and Executive Director of Computers for Schools Burundi (CfSB) believes that ICT integration into the Burundian education system and focused education for innovation in e-waste management are the keys to capitalize on Fourth Industrial Revolution opportunities.

    Prof. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin, is part of the CfSB team and contributes as a Global Impact & Sustainability Analyst. Shen created the infographic to integrate three major language spoken in Burundi: Kirundi, Swahili, and English to showcase the differences of cultural meanings of general ideas, concepts and ICT vocabulary. In addition, Prof. Cowin hopes to promote intercultural and plurilingual competences through the trilingual infographic.

    A principal goal of CfSB is to modernize the Burundi education system through universal ICT education in primary and secondary schools, thereby creating access to and equity in digital skills for Burundian youth. The vision is to promote and integrate the use of ICT and 21st Century skills into primary and secondary schools as the main engine of sustainable development in Burundi. The mission focuses on delivering quality ICT education to all Burundian school-age youth, thereby creating a solid foundation for the development of future innovation, industrialization, science, technology integration; eventually resulting in poverty reduction and allowing Burundi’s citizens to participate in and join as global citizens in the global economy.

    Featured

    Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin on “Practicing the Philosophy of Abundance: Resources to Support Displaced Learners,” VirtuaTELL Spring 2022 Conference May 14, 2022, NYS TESOL

    It was my pleasure to present this workshop for the VirtuaTELL Spring 2022 Conference on May 14, 2022, NYS TESOL

    I believe that in alignment with SDG 4.c that teachers are the change agents for the future.

    4.c By 2030, substantially increase the supply of qualified teachers, including through international cooperation for teacher training in developing countries, especially least developed countries and small island developing States.

    Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin
    Assistant Professor and TESOL Practicum Coordinator
    Touro University
    Graduate School of Education, New York, NY

    This workshop covered:

    The Philosophy of Abundance
    Understanding Trauma and Its Impact
    The Stress Response System
    Words Matter
    Teaching materials on refugees, asylum and migration for primary and secondary education
    UNHCR Teaching About Refugees 2021 – Language Learning Guidebook
    Teaching Techniques for Multilingual Learners
    The Teacher Tech Tool Wheel
    Google Resources
    The Internet Archive
    Open Educational Resources
    Q&A

    I am sharing the workshop with all the global conference participants and educators who support displaced learners. I believe that in alignment with SDG 4.c that “teachers are the change agents for the future.

    Both PDF’s feature embedded links to resources you can click on – go ahead, download and use the abundant resources available to YOU.

    Teaching is an Act of Love

    Let us move away from deficit thinking and the scarcity education model where education providers together with a group of experts use expensive resources such as required purchases for materials, texts etc., and paid access to platforms which in essence constitute a social justice issue.

    Instead, let us embrace the social and situated nature of learning while embracing and developing an asset-based approach to teaching and learning.

    Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin
    Assistant Professor and TESOL Practicum Coordinator
    Touro University
    Graduate School of Education, New York, NY
    Featured

    Touro University TESOL Candidate Bianca Soto-King’s Reflections on her Fieldwork Experience in EDPN 673

    EDPN 673 Methods and Materials for Teaching English as a Second Language

    This course provides a historical overview of second language acquisition theories and teaching methods. Students learn how to apply current approaches, methods and techniques, with attention to the effective use of materials, in teaching English as a second language. Students will engage in the planning and implementation of standards-based ESL instruction which includes differentiated learning experiences geared to students’ needs. Emphasis is placed on creating culturally responsive learning environments. Includes 15 hours of fieldwork.

    Bianca Soto-King is an NYC Public School teacher who currently works in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn. She teaches 6th grade ELA and is completing her master’s degree in TESOL at Touro University. She is a native Brooklynite and a lover of all things literary.

    During my fieldwork hours, I learned how to plan standards-based ESL instruction and how to implement differentiated learning experiences in order to meet my students’ needs. By observing others and working on the assignments given by Professor Cowin, I was able to create a more culturally responsive learning environment for my students.

    Bianca Soto-King, Touro University TESOL Candidate
    Featured

    Touro University TESOL Candidates Luz Chavarrio’s and John Zurschmiede’s Discussion Board Vlogs on Multilingual Learner Support

    When designing rich and meaningful online courses discussion boards (DBs) are an opportunity to increase the social presence of students and facilitator. Vlogs instead of text-based DBs create a social presence for students and faculty, thereby allowing connectedness and group cohesion to develop.

    Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin, Assistant Professor and TESOL Practicum Coordinator, Touro University, GSE

    DBs are an important vehicle to measure growth, connect with students beyond text-based contributions, introduce new technology, and interact using different modalities and media. I find that varying the format and giving students the ability to express themselves through different media introduces spaces of discovery, communication, and peer-to-peer learning while giving diverse learning styles various ways to shine.

    This Discussion Board focused on a deep dive and exploration of early interventions as well as the RTI system. Touro TESOL candidates were asked to reflect on the importance of providing Multilingual Learners the support and interventions they may need. Candidates also reflected on assessing students in their native language in order to differentiate between academic or language issues.

    Luz Chavarrio currently attends Touro College. This is her first year as a public school teacher. She is currently working as a Spanish teacher in an elementary school on the Lower East Side.

    Luz Chavarrio’s Vlog on“Making Content Comprehensible for English Learners”

    Vlog References:

    Ariza, E. N., & Coady, M. R. (2018). Why Tesol?: Theories and issues in teaching English to speakers of other languages in K-12 classrooms (5th ed.). Kendall Hunt Pub Co.

    Echevarría Jana, Vogt, M. E., & Short, D. (2017). Making content comprehensible for English learners: The Siop model. Pearson.

    John Zurschmiede: “I am originally from South Africa where I graduated from the University of the Witwatersrand with a Batchelor’s in Primary Education. Since came to the United States, I have worked at private ESL institutions as an instructor and as an Academic Lead. I have also completed a Master’s in Adult Education and am currently studying at Touro college pursuing NYS TESOL certification.”

    Vlog Response to Intervention:

    Vlog references:

    Emerson Dickman, G (n.d.). RTI and Reading: Response to Intervention in a Nutshell. https://www.readingrockets.org/article/rti-and-reading-response-intervention-nutshell (Links to an external site.)

    RTI-Based Specific Learning Disability Determination Worksheet. (n.d.). https://wyominginstructionalnetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/MTSS-SLD-Eligibility-Documentation-Worksheet.pdf

    Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

    New York is a state that speaks many languages. We need teachers who can find the common ground.

    The MS in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) Program helps NYS-certified PreK-12 teachers more effectively teach and communicate with a diverse student population.

    Academically rigorous and practice-intensive, the 33-credit program includes 50 hours of fieldwork and at least 20 days or 100 hours of supervised student teaching experience. Candidates that complete all coursework, fieldwork, and student teaching requirements are eligible for recommendation for ESL certification.

    Featured

    NYS TESOL Webinar Event: Digital Storytelling and Community Asset Mapping, Thursday, May 5, 2022🔹Time: 4:00-5:15PM Eastern

    NYS TESOL Webinar Event📣FREE to ALL Interested.Join  #NYSTESOL’s president Dr. Ching-Ching Lin, Nicole Bell, and Dr. Jasmin Cowin for an interactive webinar event that reimagines digital storytelling as a tool for community asset mapping. The purpose of this webinar is multifold:

    1.Provide a very brief review of digital storytelling as a classroom community building strategy

    2. Introduce a simple, easy-to-follow model of implementing digital storytelling 

    3. Analyze a variety of model texts as well as early practitioners’ samples4.    Participants will have the opportunities to create your digital stories and seek feedback from each other.

    🔹 NYS TESOL Event: No app needed. Digital storytelling and community assets mapping🔹Presenters: Dr. Ching-Ching Lin, Nicole Bell and Dr. Jasmin Cowin

    🔹Date: Thursday, May 5, 2022

    🔹Time: 4:00-5:15PM Eastern 🔹Event Registration & Information: https://lnkd.in/evfUC98R is required, no later than 1 hour prior to the start of the session.  (1 CTLE credit for NYS TESOL members)#bilingual #NYSTESOL2022#ENL #TESOL

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    Africa Leader features “Computers for Schools Burundi: Gukorera Hamwe through Cultural Competency Training” by Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin

    Africa Leader features news from around the continent. Serving the African continent for a period spanning two decades, Africa Leader prides itself on presenting the latest news and feature stories from around the region and featured Dr. Cowin’s article “Computers for Schools Burundi: Gukorera Hamwe through Cultural Competency Training.”

    Cowin, J. (. (2022, April 27). Computers for Schools Burundi: Gukorera Hamwe through Cultural Competency Training. Retrieved from Africa Leader: https://www.africaleader.com/newsr/15023

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    Touro University TESOL Candidate Meghan Schick on “Making Content Comprehensible for English Learners”

    When designing rich and meaningful online courses discussion boards (DBs) are an opportunity to increase both the facilitators’ teaching and the social presence of the students and facilitator. Video DBs create a social presence for students and facilitators, thereby allowing connectedness and group cohesion to develop.

    DBs are an important vehicle to measure growth, connect with students beyond text-based contributions, introduce new technology, and interact using different modalities and media. I find that varying the format and giving students the ability to express themselves through different media introduces spaces of discovery, communication, and peer-to-peer learning while giving diverse learning styles various ways to shine.

    To gain a further understanding of early interventions as well as the RTI system Touro TESOL candidates were asked to reflect on the importance of providing Multilingual Learners the support and interventions they may need. Candidates also reflected on assessing this student in their native language in order to tell if it is an academic or a language issue.

    Video contributions increase “the ability of participants…to project their personal characteristics into the community, thereby presenting themselves to the other participants as real people”

    Garrison, Anderson, & Archer, 2000, p. 89.

    Meghan Schick is completing her second semester at Touro Univerity, Graduate School of Education, TESOL & BLE Department and working towards her Master’s in TESOL.

    I feel that I have already learned a lot of valuable information that will help me in my career.

    Meghan Schick, Touro University TESOL candidate

    Meghan Schick: “I thoroughly enjoyed reading Chapter 10 in “Making Content Comprehensible for English Learners.” I am very passionate when it comes to the topics of issues with Reading, RTI, and Special Education for English Learners. As an educator who has the opportunity to work with English learners, I have to be aware of their language proficiency levels. We have to be aware that a student’s difficulty to learn reading might just be from their limited English Proficiency and not mislabel them as special needs.

    References:
    Echevarria Jana,Vogt,M.E., & Short, D.(2017). Making Content Comprehensible for English Learners: The SIOP Model. Pearson

    Meghan Schick, Touro University TESOL candidate

    Questions:

    • How would you avoid the trap of confusing and labeling an entering ESL student with a student with special needs?
    • What is RIT and how might it be useful to you as a TESOL professional?
    • How might you use the RTI-Based Specific Learning Disability Determination Worksheet?

    References:

    Garrison, R., Anderson, T., & Archer, W. (2000). Critical inquiry in a text-based environment: Computer conferencing in higher education. The Internet and Higher Education, 2(2 – 3), 87-105. doi: 10.1016/S1096-7516(00)00016-6