CALL-IS Webinar: Authentic Materials for Second Language Acquisition: Sources and Resources presented by Dr. Lubie Alatriste & Moderator Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin

When:  Dec 14, 2022, from 01:00 PM to 02:00 PM (ET)

DESCRIPTION: In this sharing session, we will look at a number of public domain websites that are used for sourcing materials for language teaching. Specifically, we will review pedagogical tools, actual lessons, language aids in terms of videos, readings, practice exercises, and some teacher training materials and resources.


PRESENTER

Lubie Alatriste holds a doctorate from Columbia University and is a professor of English/Applied Linguistics at the City University of New York (CUNY). Her research interests include genre analysis, institutional discourse, reflexivity and praxis in education, second language writing, curriculum, and materials development. Her most recent book-length publication is Language Research in Multilingual Settings (2020, Palgrave MacMillan), and Second Language Writing in Transitional Spaces (2020, University of Michigan Press). She is the author of numerous articles and has served on editorial boards of international journals. Lubie is a founding co-editor/Editor-in-Chief of TESOL Affiliate NYS TESOL Journal. The webinar will be moderated by Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin, Touro University.

LOCATION

Online Instructions:

Url: http://sites.tesol.org/MemberPortal/Events/TESOL%20Webinar/Zoom/TESOL-Event-Detail?eventkey=ZM121422ca
Login: Register through the TESOL webpage

Touro University TESOL Candidate Evdokia Gasparis’s Content-Area Text Analysis of Samuel Morse’s “That’s Who! The Story of the Telegraph and Morse Code” by Tracy Nelson Maurer

EDDN 637 Second Language Learners and the Content Areas

Students will become acquainted with and practice effective approaches, methods, and strategies for teaching and evaluating English language learners in the content areas (ELA, social studies, math and science). Throughout the course, students will explore the impact of culture and language on classroom learning. Special challenges in teaching and assessment in each content area will also be discussed. Includes 15 hours of fieldwork.

Evdokia Gasparis: My family consists of many English language learners, which has influenced me to pursue a master’s degree in TESOL. I completed a bachelor’s degree in elementary/early childhood education and psychology from Queens College, which led me to attain a 1-6 common branch license. As I expand my knowledge in the field of education, I strive to effectively differentiate all instructional activities to meet the needs of all students. I aspire not simply to teach, but to inspire all my students to challenge their limits!

Alliteration can be located at several points throughout Samuel Morse’s “That’s Who!: The Story of the Telegraph and Morse Code” by Tracy Nelson Maurer. For example, “… tromping from town to town…” and “Success always seemed one step ahead for Samuel.” The academic language is quite challenging, as it is content specific. Content-specific terms include Morse Code, inventions, telegraph, and French Optical Telegraph System. ELLs are at a disadvantage due to their limited background knowledge of the history of the United States. Prior to reading, educators must focus on building background knowledge and pre-teaching vocabulary, in order for students to properly comprehend the literature.

Evdokia Gasparis, Touro University TESOL Candidate

Touro University TESOL Candidate Shannon Smith on Incorporating Culture into Materials for Multilingual Learners

As educators, incorporating culture into language teaching is crucial. Learning about different cultures can help us approach languages with new insights.
We can feel more connected to our students and our students can connect with each other.

Shannon Smith, Touro University TESOL candidate

EDPN 673 Methods and Materials for Teaching English as a Second Language

This course provides a historical overview of second language acquisition theories and teaching methods. Students learn how to apply current approaches, methods and techniques, with attention to the effective use of materials, in teaching English as a second language. Students will engage in the planning and implementation of standards-based ESL instruction which includes differentiated learning experiences geared to students’ needs. Emphasis is placed on creating culturally responsive learning environments. Includes 15 hours of field work.

Materials Critique & Redesign: Candidates will: (1) prepare a written critique description of the material or resource, analyzing its effectiveness for ELLs and (2) based on your analysis, redesign one section/activity (which could be an infographic, mindmap or anything that shows a redesign) of the original material so that it meets the need of ELLs. The materials chosen will promote culturally and linguistically responsive classrooms and instructional practices.

  • Candidates will promote culturally and linguistically responsive classrooms and instructional practices
  • Candidates will apply strategies to adapting grade-level, content area instruction to include culturally and linguistically different students as well as gifted and special education ELLs.

Touro University TESOL candidate Shannon Smith is a graduate student at Touro University pursuing a master’s degree in the TESOL program. She is certified in general education and special education 1-6.

Ms. Smith, “I am currently teaching a Kindergarten class that has a majority of ENL students. All of the courses I have taken at Touro and all of the professors have been preparing me for the real world. I thoroughly have been enjoying learning different strategies to implement in my Kindergarten classroom.”

Touro University TESOL candidate Cynthia Olavarria’s Analysis of Gary the Monster by Charlesworth

EDPN 673 Methods and Materials for Teaching English as a Second Language

This course provides a historical overview of second language acquisition theories and teaching methods. Students learn how to apply current approaches, methods and techniques, with attention to the effective use of materials, in teaching English as a second language. Students will engage in the planning and implementation of standards-based ESL instruction which includes differentiated learning experiences geared to students’ needs. Emphasis is placed on creating culturally responsive learning environments. Includes 15 hours of field work.

Materials Critique & Redesign: Candidates will: (1) prepare a written critique description of the material or resource, analyzing its effectiveness for ELLs and (2) based on your analysis, redesign one section/activity (which could be an infographic, mindmap or anything that shows a redesign) of the original material so that it meets the need of ELLs. The materials chosen will promote culturally and linguistically responsive classrooms and instructional practices.

  • Candidates will promote culturally and linguistically responsive classrooms and instructional practices
  • Candidates will apply strategies to adapting grade-level, content area instruction to include culturally and linguistically different students as well as gifted and special education ELLs.

Touro University TESOL candidate Cynthia Olavarria is a Special Education Educator in an elementary school in Brooklyn, New York. “I believe in collaboration so we can make changes in the lives of our youth.”

This book is a great way for kids to build on what they already know about colors and feelings while also learning something new. Looking at page 2-3 the author uses the skill of rhyming to grab the reader’s attention. “Gary is big, Gary is green. Gary is hairy. And Gary thinks EVERYTHING is scary.” (Charlesworth, Gary the Monster, 2018, pp. 3-4) This skill can be a little difficult for students to learn. Rhyming is hard for students who are not ELL’s so we know that it can be significantly challenging for students who are ELL’s.

Cynthia Olavarria, Touro University TESOL candidate

Touro University TESOL Candidate Marizabel Nunez’s Comprehensible Input Mindmap for Multilingual Learners

EDDN 637 Second Language Learners and the Content Areas

Students will become acquainted with and practice effective approaches, methods, and strategies for teaching and evaluating English language learners in the content areas (ELA, social studies, math and science). Throughout the course, students will explore the impact of culture and language on classroom learning. Special challenges in teaching and assessment in each content area will also be discussed. Includes 15 hours of fieldwork.

“I attended Touro College and earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology and a master’s degree in education, teaching students with disabilities in grades 7-12. Professor Cowin has taught me much about the theory of bilingual teaching, learning, practice, and strategies to use with English language learners this semester.”

Marizabel Nunez, Touro University TESOL Candidate

References

How to teach such that they understand(2018) The Comprehensible Classroom. Available at: https://comprehensibleclassroom.com/2018/07/26/how-to-teach-such-that-they-understand/Links to an external site.

Lesson plans: Using procedures (2015) TeacherVision

Touro University TESOL Candidate Marizabel Nunez was born and raised in Brooklyn, New York. Her family is from the Dominican Republic, and most of them are linguistically diverse.

Completion of Module Making Workshop with the Department of Online Education!

I completed the Module Making Workshop with the Department of Online Education at Touro University.

In order to teach online courses as an instructor at Touro College,I wanted to learn more about how to elevate setting up course modules for your online course(s). The Module Making Workshop is a 4-week course guided me through the essential components of creating an online module including creating measurable learning objectives, adding critical design elements (e.g., headers), and creating a logical flow to course content.

The components of this workshop adhere to the standards outlined in Touro’s Rubric for Online Education, which is the instrument used to evaluate the quality of online courses at Touro.

Touro University Bilingual Candidate Paola Gomez’s Demonstration of the Total Physical Response Method

“As a professor, I created this blog as a mechanism to support, appreciate and showcase exemplary work of my graduate and professional Touro University TESOL/BLE teacher candidates. By emphasizing candidates’ best work, and their innovative, thoughtful, reflective contributions I provide a path to shift the focus to their professional values while recognizing and celebrating their significant milestones in the Touro University TESOL/BLE program.” by Jasmin (Bey) Cowin

EDPN 673 Methods and Materials for Teaching English as a Second Language

This course provides a historical overview of second language acquisition theories and teaching methods. Students learn how to apply current approaches, methods and techniques, with attention to the effective use of materials, in teaching English as a second language. Students will engage in the planning and implementation of standards-based ESL instruction which includes differentiated learning experiences geared to students’ needs. Emphasis is placed on creating culturally responsive learning environments. Includes 15 hours of fieldwork.

Mrs. Paola Gomez was born in the Bronx and raised partially in the Dominican Republic. She attended Hunter College where she received her degree in Music Performance and Touro University, GSE where she received her master’s in education. She is currently a teacher at P186X, where she hopes to integrate her bilingual teaching skills acquired from Touro University’s bilingual education program.

Paola wishes to thank her family, her husband, Justin, and her professor, Dr. Jasmin Cowin, for her support and dedication to candidate learning during the fall semester of 2022.

For my multilingual learners, the total physical response mini lesson centered around the vocabulary words of body parts gave them the opportunity to make a connection between body parts in their language and body parts in English. For example, if I were to show just the name of each body part, without any visual support and physical action to go with it, my multilingual learners might had struggled to understand that Mouth is Boca. Having the visual support accompanied by the motor activity, helped the students to successfully identify, recall, and acquire new vocabulary in a new language.

Paola Gomez, Touro University Bilingual Candidate

Evdokia Gasparis, Touro University TESOL Candidate & Differentiated Instructional Activity Math Lesson

“As a professor, I created this blog as a mechanism to support, appreciate and showcase exemplary work of my graduate and professional Touro University TESOL/BLE teacher candidates. By emphasizing candidates’ best work, and their innovative, thoughtful, reflective contributions I provide a path to shift the focus to their professional values, while recognizing and celebrating their significant milestones in the Touro University TESOL/BLE program.” by Jasmin (Bey) Cowin

As a professor, I created this blog as a mechanism to support, appreciate and showcase exemplary work of my graduate and professional Touro University TESOL/BLE teacher candidates. By emphasizing candidates’ best work, and their innovative, thoughtful, reflective contributions I provide a path to shift the focus to their professional values, while recognizing and celebrating their significant milestones in the Touro University TESOL/BLE program.

Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin (Assistant Professor and TESOL Practicum Coordinator, Touro University, GSE)

EDDN 637 Second Language Learners and the Content Areas: Students will become acquainted with and practice effective approaches, methods, and strategies for teaching and evaluating English language learners in the content areas (ELA, social studies, math and science). Throughout the course, students will explore the impact of culture and language on classroom learning. Special challenges in teaching and assessment in each content area will also be discussed. Includes 15 hours of fieldwork.

Evdokia Gasparis: “My family consists of many English language learners, which has influenced me to pursue a master’s degree in TESOL. I completed a bachelor’s degree in elementary/early childhood education and psychology from Queens College, which led me to attain a 1-6 common branch license. As I expand my knowledge in the field of education, I strive to effectively differentiate all instructional activities to meet the needs of all students. I aspire not simply to teach, but to inspire all my students to challenge their limits!”

EDDN 637:

Assignment Description Differentiated Instructional Activity:

For your Differentiated Instructional Activity Assignment, using the Key Elements of Differentiated Instruction.pdf Download Key Elements of Differentiated Instruction.pdf you will use one of your content lesson plans you have already taught and make modifications to support Multilingual Learners to the following segments:

  1. practice (how teachers deliver instruction to students),
  2. process (how the lesson is designed for students),
  3. products (the kinds of work products students will be asked to complete),
  4. content (the specific readings, research, or materials, students will study),
  5. assessment (how teachers measure what students have learned), and
  6. grouping (how students are arranged in the classroom or paired up with other students).

You will submit both the original content lesson and plan and the lesson plan with differentiated instructional activities, with a reflection of your professional growth completing this assignment. Your product for Differentiated Instructional Activity Assignment will be:

  1. A paper including the original lesson plan/differentiated lesson plan addressing points 1 -6 above
  2. 2-4 minute video showcasing one specific aspect of one of your Differentiated Instructional Activities

Picture Walk Video Evdokia Gasparis, Touro University TESOL Candidate
Entering / Emerging Differentiated Worksheet
Entering / Emerging Differentiated Worksheet
Entering / Emerging Differentiated Worksheet
Expanding Differentiated Worksheet
Transitioning / Bridging Differentiated Worksheet

“…all students work at different speeds, therefore it is essential to group students strategically to provide needed support. During the differentiated lesson, students are grouped homogenously. Homogenous grouping allows students, with similar academic needs and readiness, to collectively complete assignments (Levine, 2012). The intent of grouping students with similar levels of readiness is to scaffold lessons that allow students to work in their zone of proximal development (ZPD) (Levine, 2012).”

Evdokia Gasparis, Touro University TESOL Candidate

“Coming to America: The Story of Immigration,” by Betsy Maestro and Touro University TESOL Candidate Ada Hirschfeld’s Text Analysis

EDDN 637 Second Language Learners and the Content Areas: Students will become acquainted with and practice effective approaches, methods, and strategies for teaching and evaluating English language learners in the content areas (ELA, social studies, math and science). Throughout the course, students will explore the impact of culture and language on classroom learning. Special challenges in teaching and assessment in each content area will also be discussed. Includes 15 hours of fieldwork.

Adah Hirschfeld is a New York City Public School librarian who currently works at IS 240 in Midwood, Brooklyn. She holds a Master of Library and Information Science degree from Pratt Institute and a Master’s degree in School Administration from Touro University. She is pursuing certification in TESOL to better meet her students’ language and literacy needs.

The Text Analysis discusses the cognitive and linguistic demands of a content area text. Touro University TESOL/BLE candidates closely analyze a chapter, or an aspect of one content-area text currently in use or recommended by New York State/BOE. Upon analysis of underlying concepts, they develop a thesis and purpose for their analysis. Mrs. Hirschfeld’s paper sequences her ideas with evidence from the text supporting essential points. Her critique features substantial, logical, and concrete development of ideas describing what makes that concept or section challenging for ELLs.

Phonics and phonological decoding of the multi-syllabic words may be difficult for ELL students. Examples of words that do not follow standard rules are: ocean, fascinating, officials, unique, foreign. Students would have to be aware of the hard and soft “c” sounds of recent, cities, places, and appreciation. As well as the spelling patterns and pronunciation of words ending in -gh and -ght.

Ada Hirschfeld, Touro University TESOL Candidate

Overall, this is a highly complex text for English language learners. The sentence length, multisyllabic unknown words, and academic vocabulary are difficult for readers to comprehend without scaffolds and modifications. The illustrations correspond to and enhance the text allowing the reader to gain an understanding but without the visual enhancement, meaning may be lost.

Ada Hirschfeld, Touro University TESOL Candidate

John Zurschmiede & Dr. Jasmin (Bey) Cowin present ”Community Asset Mapping and Linguistically Diverse Learners” at the NTSTESOL 52nd Annual Conference, “Shifting Teaching Paradigms: Examining Inclusive and Dynamic Practices,” November 2-5, 2022, White Plains, NY

John Zurscmiede, Touro University, TESOL Program Completer

How can educators better support linguistically diverse students and their families was a question hotly debated in the Touro University bilingual and multicultural education discussion boards by Touro University TESOL teacher candidates. The discussion boards focused on English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) teacher praxis’, highlighting the targeted inclusion of asset-based approaches. As a professor leading the discussions, the topic sparked deep reflection, and a goal crystallized: to create and implement an impactful hands-on project. The discussion centered around shifting teaching paradigms towards more inclusive, dynamic practices empowering Multilingual Learners (ML). Teachers often enter their profession unprepared to draw on the strengths and assets that culturally and linguistically diverse students bring to school.  (Elfers, 2013)

Out of the discussion boards grew a book chapter with a former teacher John Zurschmiede, post-degree completion: ACROSS BOUNDARIES: COMMUNITY ASSET MAPPING AND LINGUISTICALLY DIVERSE LEARNERS, in which John Zurschmiede, now a teacher at the Board of Education, at an International school, co-constructed not only a project but also meaning-making in a collaborative space bringing together different dimensions of teacher-learner in two different levels. Level 1: the faculty-teacher candidate, Level 2: The former teacher candidate – his Multilingual Learners. This was an interwoven process that created fertile spaces of intentional collaboration across boundaries resulting in a book chapter in “Supporting Student Success through Community Asset Mapping.”

I am deeply grateful for the collaboration with my former student John Zurschmiede which expanded my horizon as an educator and shifted my teaching paradigms. I experienced that funds of knowledge are not static as we are all life-long learners embedded in the tapestry of our communities, personal histories and experiences which we express through our unique linguistic landscapes.