Miklós GÓR-NAGY – Hungarian Trade Attaché to speak at the Rotary Club of New York United Nations International Breakfast Meeting Feb. 17, 2021

As Chair of the Rotary Club of New York United Nations International Breakfast Meeting it is my pleasure to announce our next guest speaker: Miklós GÓR-NAGY, Hungarian Trade Attaché

In addition to his career as a professional athlete, he graduated from International Business School with a degree in economics and marketing, and earned a law degree from the Károli Gáspár Reformed University. He also has an international water polo referee and coach degree. He has been working at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade since 2019. In 2020, he began his service at the Consulate General in New York as a trade attaché. He is married and has two young children, Gordon and Abigel.

From 1992 to 2019 he was a professional water polo player. He has played for BVSC, Eger, Honvéd, Budvanska Rivijera Budva, OSC, and Ferencváros. He played his first national team match in 2005, under the captaincy of Dénes Kemény. He has participated in five world championships, three European championships, played 435 first division water polo matches in the Hungarian championship, and 200 he has times caps in the Hungarian national team.

Results Selected: FINA World Champion – Barcelona (2013), FINA World Championship silver – Budapest (2017), European Championship silver – Belgrade 2006, Budapest (2014), European Championship bronze – Belgrade (2016), World League silver – 4x , World Cup silver – Almaty (2014), European Youth Champion (2001), Juniur World Championship and European Championship silver medals.

Results in club teams: 3x Hungarian champion, 3x Hungarian Cup winner, 3x Hungarian Super Cup winner, LEN Champions League winner (FTC – 2019), LEN Super Cup winner (FTC – 2019), Montenegrian Cup winner (Budva – 2008)

Wed, February 17, 2021 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM EST

Register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rotary-club-of-new-york-international-breakfast-virtual-2172021-tickets-140300144509

Holo Sail Holdings, Inc, Global Supply Chain Logistics and SDG 8 by John P. Walker II and Dr. Jasmin Cowin

John P. Walker II, Holo Sail Holdings, Inc: President / Chairman and Dr. Jasmin Cowin, Holo Sail Holdings, Inc: Advisor to Executive Management are featured in a publication by The American Reporter. Read our vision on disruptive technologies, black swans, a possible job famine and integrating automation into the fabric of our shared humanity through resource efficiency in consumption and production as Holo Sail Holdings vision of a prosperous and promising future.

Thomas Missong, President of the European Association of Credit Rating Agencies (EACRA) speaks at the United Nations Rotary Club of New York International Breakfast Meeting on January 20th, 2021

Thomas MissongPresident of the European Association of Credit Rating Agencies (EACRA)

TOPIC: “Credit Rating Agencies: stocktaking in times of crisis, Competition and international Framework“.

Date And Time
Wed, January 20, 2021 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM EST

Since 2010, Thomas Missong is the President of the European Association of Credit Rating Agencies (EACRA), registered in Paris, France, currently representing 9 credit rating agencies registered in the Euroepan Union and 3 in Switzerland, Turkey and Russia. Additionally, Thomas is a Managing Director at RATINGPLATFORM, a specialized website on ratings on a global level. He acted as independent Board Member of Russia’s leading agency Analytical Credit Rating Agency from its establishment in November 2015 to July 2020.

Prior to that Thomas was Executive Director of Triple A Corporate and Rating Advisory, a 100% subsidiary of UniCredit Bank Austria in Vienna, acting as communication channel between the bank, the bank clients and the international rating agencies.

In the past he worked as a project manager in Bank Austria Creditanstalt in the Energy and Utilities team in Vienna and as project Manager for Lyonnaise des Eaux, the leading global water utility, in Paris.

Thomas Missong has a Master’s degree in European Political Affairs from the College of Europe in Bruges and holds a Magister in Business Administration from Wirtschaftsuniversitat in Vienna (with focus on Capital Markets).

Register here:

Touro TESOL Candidate Radhika Hira on Teaching According to the Stages of Literacy Development

Discussion Boards are invaluable for students to develop their analytic skills, reflect on their readings and interact with their peers. Here an outstanding DB by Touro TESOL Candidate Radhika Hira on Teaching According to the Stages of Literacy Development.

Radhika Hira, a preservice elementary school teacher and yoga teacher in New York will graduate with her MA in Dual Inclusive Elementary Education from Teachers College this fall, and is working on a TESOL extension from Touro as well.
Radhika states that “I’m kind of known for my positive attitude! I think it is my biggest strength in a classroom – it allows my students to have a growth mindset. Since they feel safe in making mistakes, it encourages risk taking as they learn to be learners. This is a tumultuous time in the world, and I am excited to be there for my students. They need us to be ‘present’ more than ever.”

This DB focuses on your reading of Teaching According to the Stages of Literacy Development

  1. How would YOU in YOUR professional teaching practice, track and assess reading levels ? Please be specific.

Over 60 years ago, Betts (1946) described a framework for levels dependent on difficulty in his book, Foundations of Reading Instruction: With Emphasis on Differentiated Guidance. This framework was based on research done over 70 years ago now, and with 41 children. The framework resulted in four levels of reading which are still applicable today. (1) the independent level, (2) the instructional level, (3) the frustration level and (4) the probable capacity level. The fourth level is based on material which is read to a student but the first three are based on the decoding and comprehending ability of the student when reading a text.

Today there are at least 7 systems that level children’s book based on this, and mathematical algorithms using word length and sentence length. (F&P, Lexile, Accelerated Reader, Reading Recover/Benchmark, DRA, DRP, & Fleish-Kincaid). I have personally used F&P running records and miscue analysis as tools to assess students reading levels. My experience leads me to see miscue analysis as a far more authentic tool to measure reading needs of students so that we can focus on improving proficiency as opposed to levels.

Educators, parents and administrators take levels seriously and while I agree that levels are an important and even elegant tool to create a framework for students in some respects, as an educator I primarily always keep in mind that they are a teacher’s tool and not a reader’s label. The following are the principles from Glasswell and Ford’s 2011 article, Let’s start Leveling about Leveling, that I plan to live by in my own professional practice:

• Leveling takes a complex idea and makes it too simple: Reading is a complex process. It involves the reader, the text, background information, culture, linguistic ability, preference and interest all in one. Boiling this down to a mathematical algorithm that assess the word length or number of words on a page in isolation makes levels simplistic and requires that a teacher weigh everything else in and employ professional judgement as well.

• Leveling takes a simple idea and makes it too complex: An example best illustrates this point. In the popular F&P system, “for level J texts, consideration is given to 10 key text characteristics (genre/forms, text structure, content, themes and ideas, language and literary features, sentence complexity, vocabulary, words, illustrations, and book and print features). Across those 10 characteristics, 66 specific criteria are further identified. In contrast, a K-level text is analyzed using the same ten characteristics with 71 specific criteria. J- and K-level texts share 21 identical criteria and many more criteria that vary only in degree. For example, sentence length in J books is 10+ words; in K books, it is 15+ words. Length ranges in J-level texts from 24–36 pages; K-level texts are 24–48 pages. In the end, a book like Henry and Mudge: The First Book is assigned to the J basket, while Frog and Toad Are Friends finds its way into the K basket.” (Glasswell, 2011,211) In addition to being inaccessible to teachers to replicate for a text that is not leveled, it is not clear if these decision are made based on empirical evidence or simply collective characteristics which are subjective. Additionally, research supporting these methods are not necessarily valid or reliable.

• Reading levels are not the same as reading needs: This might be the most critical principle to keep in mind when I implement reading levels. Readers within a level might differ drastically in their needs. Even if readers have the same number of miscues, self corrections and errors, the reasons behind these could be vastly different indicating a distinct skill that needs to be addressed for the reader.

• Progress does not equal proficiency: Readers progressing from one level to the next are not necessarily acquiring proficiency since the emphasis is more on the text and the level than the reader. Additionally this often creates competition & judgement in relation to reading which can create more aversion to reading for many.

• Readers have rights (as well as levels): This quote from the F&P blog really sums up the importance of ensuring levels are always kept in check and come after a reader’s right to read and consume knowledge as they desire.

“Fountas and Pinnell on Leveling: A Teacher’s Tool – Levels can be a resource for you and your colleagues to guide student choices for independent reading, but they should not be a limitation or a requirement. Leveled books are instructional tools for teachers who understand them—nothing more. Above all else, a level is a teacher’s tool, not a child’s label.” (F&P, 2016)

  1. Watching the webcast and looking at the Reading Rockets resources was there anything that you will be able to incorporate into your professional practice?

There were many moments in the webcast that resonated with me and reinforced ideas that I have about practice. Dr. Pressley stressed throughout the webcast how teachers need to consistently keep abreast of new developments and spend time deep diving into the resources they have, even if those are limited. This is important as an educator to keep in mind and always ensure we attend PDs, and keep abreast of what is happening in the field so we can make informed decisions for our students to support them.

Carol Ann Tomlinson talks about “The student leading the teacher.” (23.57) and I believe this is critical since we need to follow our student’s lead. This can only result in better motivation, engagement and a sense of enhanced learning for the classroom community. However, Tomlinson’s work has it’s foundations in gifted education and is not empirical but is based on the intersection of readiness, interest and the student’s learning profile so that content, process or product is modified. It is a responsive approach based on consistent observation of the student. While crucial to consistently assessing students, this approach also makes the teacher central in terms of creating modifications. It takes pre-set content and then tries to adapt it for different learners. This understanding makes me more convinced of the benefits of a UDL (Universal Design for Learning) instructional strategy more than ever. UDL is based in neuroscience and on the principles of the 8 multiple intelligences. While it has foundations and is connected to special education, it is a ‘lens to look through so we can remove barriers and center learners.’ It provides for multiple means of representation, action and expression as the three pillars of lessons and teaching to bring all students access to content in ways they learn best. It is a constructivist approach where in addition to readiness and interests, aspects of the whole student like family, culture, and community are also included. As Carol Ann Tomlinson says “as capturing their best ways of learning” (Tomlinson, 32.49) and “taking advantage of every skill opportunity”(Tomlinson, 9:58).

I believe a UDL approach as opposed to differentiation makes it less challenging for us as teachers because you don’t go into a lesson with set content that then needs to differentiated based on students. You approach the lesson and offer students different ways to access, learn and represent their learning right from the start. If your starting point is that, the process becomes far less intimidating and challenging. It is a resource that “gives you more flexibility rather than hamper it.” (Tomlinson, 41.00)

  1. List Challs stages of reading development aligned with age, 1 key teaching principles, and 1 key teaching practices for each stage.

‘0-6 Years

STAGE 0: By age 6, children can understand thousands of words they hear but can read/write few if any of them.

Principle: They should be exposed to rich experiential learning and shared reading so that they can develop a rich vocabulary. Practice: Their vocabulary and language is developing and are encouraged to draw and scribble. Games, play, word walls and verbal exchanges are instrumental. Purposeful writing is important.

6-7 years

At the end of STAGE 1, most children can understand up to 4000 or more words when heard but can read/write about 600.

Principle: Direct and systematic phonics instruction and Shared, guided and interactive reading and writing are a focus.

Practice: Vocabulary is still developing and in addition they can listen to and discuss stories and write recounts/retells of stories. Invented spelling is encouraged.

7-9 Years

At the end of STAGE 2, about 3000 words can be read, written and understood and about 9000 are known when heard. NB: children’s written language may be up to 3 years behind oral language.

Principle: Continued Phonics in conjunction with learning to express ideas and writing purposefully.

Practice: Exploring interesting though familiar, topics, collection data, word walls, guided reading.

9-13 years

At beginning of STAGE 3, listening comprehension of the same material is still more effective than comprehension and composition. By the end of Stage 3, literacy and listening are about equal for those who read very well.

Principle: Consolidation of constrained skills; speaking, listening and viewing for a range of purposes in diverse knowledge areas to focus on main idea and key strategies of evaluating and analyzing.

Practice: Literacy practice is replaced by reading and writing meaningfully for authentic purposes through complex activities like debates, and discussions.

  1. What did you learn for your own professional practice that was surprising after reading: Teaching According to the Stages of Literacy Development

While reading the article the one thing that stood out to me was the idea that inventive spelling should be encouraged in Stage 1. While I think I’ve instinctively seen this occur and I understood it, it was nice to see it as part of the stage of literacy development. It also makes perfect sense in combination with the idea that phonics are just about being introduced and the student’s understanding of phonemes and the sound letter connection is most important at this stage.

References:

Brace, E. (2017, April 10). Teaching According to the Stages of Literacy Development. Retrieved November 13, 2020, from https://www.theliteracybug.com/journal/2017/8/4/literacy-

teaching-in-accordance-with-the-stages-of-literacy-development?rq=Teaching+According+to+the+stages+of+literacy+development

Fountas&Pinnell. (2016, September 29). A Level is a Teacher’s Tool, NOT a Child’s Label. Retrieved November 18, 2020, from https://fpblog.fountasandpinnell.com/a-level-is-a-teacher-s-tool-not-a-child-s-label

Glasswell, K., & Ford, M. (2011). Let’s start Leveling ab

Touro College TESOL candidate Eva Sipe’s SIOP lesson plan and presentation for EDDN 637

Context and Overview

The focus in the Touro TESOL course EDDN 637 Second Language Learners and the Content Areas is on practicing effective approaches, methods, and strategies for teaching and evaluating English language learners in the content areas (ELA, social studies, math and science). Teacher candidates are required to design a sheltered instruction lesson following the Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP) Model, a research-based and validated instructional model that has proven effective in addressing the academic needs of English learners throughout the United States.  Candidates need to explain how and why they’ve decided on the specific lesson content and language needs to be addressed.  Activities focus on assessing student needs before, during and upon lesson completion to enhance future instructional planning.  An outstanding SIOP lesson plan was submitted by Touro TESOL candidate Eva Sipe.

Eva Sipe, a 3rd Grade NYC Public School Teacher in Brooklyn, NY, has taught Special Education since 2005 and taught English Language Learners since 2016. She received her Undergraduate Diploma and Master’s Degrees in Comparative Religions and Philosophy at the Catholic University of Lublin in her native country, Poland. She received her Dual Master in General and Special Education from Touro College and her Advanced TESOL Certificate from Adelphi University. She is currently pursuing an Advanced Certificate in Bilingual Education at Touro College to better serve the bilingual population of students at her school.

Rotary Club Of New York International UN event: Wolfram von Heynitz – Deputy Consul General of Germany in New York on December 16th, 2020 will speak on “The Future of Transatlantic Cooperation”

As Chair of the RCNY UN International meetings I am pleased to announce Wolfram von Heynitz – Deputy Consul General of Germany in New York will speak on “The Future of Transatlantic Cooperation” on Wednesday, December 16, 2020 7:00 PM – 8:00 PM EST. Please register at: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/wolfram-von-heynitz-deputy-consul-general-of-germany-in-new-york-tickets-131642370875

About Wolfram von Heynitz
Wolfram von Heynitz is currently the Deputy Consul General of Germany in New York.

Prior to this he was Head of the Cyber Policy Coordination Staff of the German Federal Foreign Office, a member of the Group of Governmental Experts on Advancing responsible State behavior in cyberspace convened in 2019 by UN Secretary-General Guterres and a member of the Ad hoc Committee on Artificial Intelligence of the Council of Europe. In this position, he was also responsible for the recently published “Recommendations for the Future of Digital cooperation” which Germany and the UAE undertook at the request of the UN.

Previous positions include a term as Research Commissioner of the German Federal Foreign Office and a member of its Policy Planning staff, specializing in Cyberpolicy, Cybersecurity, and, in the face of emerging challenges, the development of future directions and strategies for the Foreign Office. He has also served as Head of the Division for Foresight, in the Ministry’s EU Enlargement Division, as the Political Counsellor in the German Embassy in Tel Aviv dealing with the Middle East Peace Process and Israeli interior politics, in the private office of the Minister for European Affairs and in the Office of the Federal President of Germany. He was also posted as Deputy Head of Mission to Ireland and Azerbaijan.

Dr. Jasmin Cowin assumes conference chair position for NYS TESOL 2021 conference

On November 14th, 2020 I was officially installed as the Conference Chair of the NYS TESOL conference 2021 with my Touro colleague Prof. Ching Ching Lin as the incoming President for 2021-2022. Monica Baker assumed the gravel as President 2020-2021. #NYSTESOL2021

RCNY Virtual International Breakfast Meeting at the UN on November 18th, 2020 featuring Consul General of Italy Francesco Genuardi

As Chair of the RCNY Virtual International Breakfast meetings at the UN it is my pleasure to announce our guest speaker the Consul General of Italy Francesco Genuardi.

As Chair of the RCNY Virtual International Breakfast meetings at the UN it is my pleasure to announce our guest speaker the Consul General of Italy Francesco Genuardi.

Francesco Genuardi is an Italian diplomat with 23 years of experience in the field of International Relations. In March 2016 he has been appointed Consul General of Italy in New York, the most prominent consular position in the Italian diplomatic service, covering the States of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Bermuda with a resident Italian Population of about 90,000 and more than 3 million Italian-Americans.

From November 2014 and prior to his appointment to New York, he was at the Cabinet of the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Hon. Gentiloni, dealing with parliamentary relations. Between 2005 and 2014 he served at the Cabinet of the Foreign Minister, working with the succeeding Ministers in office. From 2002 to 2005 he was appointed Counselor at the Permanent Mission of Italy to NATO, where he was responsible, among other issues, for the relationship with the Press in Brussels and with the NATO Parliamentary Assembly.

From 1998 to 2002 he served as Deputy Consul at the Consulate General in Buenos Aires, Argentina. He joined the diplomatic service in 1993, and between 1993 and 1998 he was at the General Directorate for Economic Affairs – where he dealt with international issues associated with environmental protection and safety – and at the Press and Media Office.

Born in Brussels on July 7, 1967, he graduated in Law at the University of Milan in 1991. He is married and has two daughters.

http://REGISTER AT: https://bit.ly/RCNYItalybkfst

Touro College TESOL Candidate Jessica Guzman’s Method Presentation

For this assignment in the course Methods and Materials for Teaching English as a Second Language Touro Teacher Candidates (TCs) plan, record on video teaching a brief mini- lesson to a specific ENL audience in a specifically designed approach to language learning.

Jessica Guzman is an Elementary school teacher holding a Masters degree in Elementary Childhood Education. She is currently a Touro College candidate in the TESOL and Bilingual Department pursuing her TESOL Certification. She chose a quote that best describes her as a teacher. “A teacher who loves teaching teaches students to love learning.” She said, “The most rewarding part of my career is to see my students excited to learn and my greatest accomplishment is becoming a teacher.”

For this assignment in the course Methods and Materials for Teaching English as a Second Language Touro Teacher Candidates (TCs) plan, record on video teaching a brief mini- lesson to a specific ENL audience in a specifically designed approach to language learning.

It is a pleasure to feature Jessica Guzman’s teaching presentation as an example of a thoughtful submission of a “pretend” mini session.

Touro College Candidate Jessica Guzman’s Method Presentation

Touro TESOL Candidate Alessia Tartamella on Program Options and Teaching Models for English Language Learners/Multilingual Learners

Online Discussion boards ensure that course questions and answers are available to all participants, create a repository of shared information and create a permanent record of all postings. Yet, apart from these points, Online Discussion Boards throughout the semester showcase students in-depth analysis of the assigned materials and their scholarly trajectory. This week I am featuring Touro College, TESOL candidate Alessia Tartamella’s excellent contribution.

Alessia Tartamella, a 3rd Grade NYC Public School teacher in Brooklyn, New York, has taught English Language Learners since 2016. She received her Bachelors Degree of Business Administration at Brooklyn College and her Masters Degree in Teaching Children grades 1-6 at Brooklyn College. Currently, she attends Touro College to pursue an extension in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages. This will be her last semester at Touro College. “I hope to soon move on to become a certified TESOL teacher in the NYC Public School system.”

  1. In NYS,  what are the  Program Options for English Language Learners/Multilingual Learners?

The Program Options for English Language Learners and Multilingual Learners are Transitional Bilingual Education Program (TBE) , Dual Language (DL) , One Way Dual Language Program, Two Way Dual Language Program and English as a New Language (ENL). (Program Options for English Language Learners/Multilingual Learners, n.d.)

2. Name the five different models currently in use that integrate language and content instruction – refer to Celce-Murcia Unit III readings.

There are different models that teachers may use when lesson planning. According to Celce-Mucia in Unit III, these models were created by experts with different views and embedded theories. The first model is the Hunter model (Hunter, 2004). This model is also known as five-step, seven-step, or nine-step model. Another model is the presentation-practice-production model (PPP). This is used mainly in beginning-level classes of language learning.  The next model is the engage-study-activate (ESA) model. This is a more versatile model than the PPP model because it allows the instructor to adapt the lesson delivery in different ways. This can be taught in different time frames and with students’ engagement in mind.  Another teaching model is the Sheltered Immersion Observation Protocol or SIOP model. This is a model developed with the intention of teaching students learning English from grades K-12th grade.  With this model, the instructor’s intention is to teach language and content at the same time. This model first started as a rubric for teacher’s observations, and evolved into a lesson-planning model.  Finally, the last teaching model is encounter, clarify, remember, internalize, and fluently use (ECRIF). This is a common model used when teachers drill strategies or vocabulary to students. 

3. Name the model that you use most and why.

In my instruction, I mainly use the Sheltered Immersion Observation Protocol or SIOP model. It is very important for students to learn content while learning a new language. In my school, teachers are expected to teach a lot of content to students, even if they do not speak English yet. We are considered a content based school.  This method of teaching English could be challenging for a teacher because it incorporates many things into a lesson, however, for a student who is learning English it allows them to use what they know in their lives and apply it to what they are learning.  This model also allows the teacher to focus on language objectives to get students to the goal or goals of the lesson. Students and teachers can activate prior knowledge, teach vocabulary and apply the lesson to real world situations to motivate students.  Then, students go on and participate in language objectives, strategies and interactions. Finally, students will practice and apply.  This model is what I am required to use in my classroom and one that I enjoy using as a third grade TESOL teacher.

In addition to this model, my school uses the ECRIF model when teaching phonics and reading to students learning how to read. We use a program called Orton-Gillingham, where students participate in language drills that they apply to reading a writing.  This strategy works well for many special education students and some ELLs, but not all. Students are taught the rules of English grammar and spelling.  After they are taught the basic rules through drills and repetition, they use them in practice for reading and writing.

4. Gather some information on student assessment from your school district. What kinds of student assessments are regularly administered, and in what language? If the district includes non-native speakers of English, are testing and assessment requirements modified or altered in any way to accommodate them? If so, how?

There are different assessments given to students in different situations.  During a student’s registration process, they are assessed through an interview and questions to determine the child’s ability in English and if the child may need special education services. This interview process is done by a trained teacher, sometimes a TESOL one and the school psychologist, if necessary. 

For learning, my school district uses different forms of assessments, but they are not altered to accommodate non-native speakers of English.  In the beginning of the year, students are given reading, writing, and math assessments. All students take the same assessment and they are all given without the teacher reading the questions to them.  However, my school district uses an online program called iReady that is tailored to all student’s needs. While the student takes the assessment, the online program adapts itself to the child’s ability.  It alters questions in different subject domains and only asks the just-right amount of questions for a child.  When the student continuously does not know answers to questions, the assessment ends. If a student continuously gets questions correct, the assessment continues on, adding difficulty to the assessment. This is a good way to get accurate ability levels in all students and does not allow them to feel discouraged. This assessment also reads to students, includes videos and engaging characters to keep students interested and excited. 

5. What is the purpose of Commissioner’s Regulations – Sections 117 http://www.p12.nysed.gov/sss/lawsregs/117-1-3.html (Links to an external site.)

The purpose of the Commissioners Regulations Sections 117 is that students must be given a screening prior to entering a school to develop a plan for learning for each child.  The students should be given this assessment to ensure they are placed in the correct learning setting. This is to ensure students with special needs are given a fair placement.  Additionally, speakers of other languages should be given a choice of a placement in a Dual language class, or ENL class when registering, if the school has the option. 

6. How do the BLUEPRINT FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNER/MULTILINGUAL LEARNER (ELL/MLL) SUCCESS http://www.nysed.gov/common/nysed/files/nys-blueprint-for-ell-success.pdf (Links to an external site.) and CR Part 154 Comprehensive ELL Education Plan (CEEP) and ENL staffing requirements connect with each other? http://www.nysed.gov/bilingual-ed/cr-part-154-comprehensive-ell-education-plan-ceep?   (Links to an external site.)http://www.nysed.gov/common/nysed/files/programs/bilingual-ed/enl-k-8-units-of-study-table-5-6-15.pdf (Links to an external site.)

These three resources have many things in common, but the most common theme is the plan for fair instruction for English Language Learners.  These three resources highlight the importance of a structured program for the diverse levels of English Language Learners.  They all enforce inclusivity and structure.  The Blueprint for English Language Learners/MLL success highlights 8 different aspects to teaching English at the highest regard.  The mission of this blueprint is described as “The mission of the New York State Education Department’s (NYSED) Office of Bilingual Education and World Languages (OBEWL) is to ensure that all New York State (NYS) students, including English Language Learners/ Multilingual Learners (ELLs/MLLs), attain the highest level of academic success and language proficiency. ” (The Blueprint for English Language Learners/MLL success, n.d.).  

The Commissioner’s Regulations 154 states that all English Language Learners must experience learning as described in the education plan for ELLs. Principals and staff must submit a plan of action for these students.  By using the ENL staffing requirements, principals can align staffing and instruction to fit the needs of the students in the school. These three resources go hand in hand because they demonstrate the appropriate planning and instruction required for a school to fairly and legally education ELL students. 

7. List 3 surprising fact you learned about in Celce-Murcia Chapter 32: Approaches to School-Based Bilingual Education Mary McGroarty & Shannon Fitzsimmons-

  • “Bilingual education is not only for recent immigrants; there are also approaches aimed at monolingual students who speak only the majority language and wish to develop strong proficiency in another language” (Celce-Murcia, 503)
  • “In the United States, there is a great deal of interest in two-way immersion model designed to serve both language minority and language majority children who wish to learn through the medium of two languages and develop literacy skills in both languages. ” (Celce-Murcia, 506)
  • Although teachers are vital, they are not the only relevant personnel. The presence of school administrators who understand bilingual instruction, other bilingual instructional personnel such as classroom aides and librarians, and bilingual staff members such as shcool secretary increase the likelihood of consistent and effective bilingual instruction.

Citations

Blueprint for English Language Learner/ Multilingual Learner Success THE STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT / THE UNIVERS ITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK Office of Bilingual Education and World L anguages. (n.d.). http://www.nysed.gov/common/nysed/files/nys-blueprint-for-ell-success.pdf (Links to an external site.)

Celce-Murcia, M., Brinton, D., & Snow, M. A. (2014). Teaching English as a second or foreign language. Boston: National Geographic Learning

CR Part 154 Comprehensive ELL Education Plan (CEEP). (n.d.). New York State Education Department. Retrieved September 28, 2020, from http://www.nysed.gov/bilingual-ed/cr-part-154-comprehensive-ell-education-plan-ceep?

CR Part 154-2 (K-8) English as New Language (ENL) Units of Study and Staffing Requirements. (n.d.). Retrieved September 28, 2020, from http://www.nysed.gov/common/nysed/files/programs/bilingual-ed/enl-k-8-units-of-study-table-5-6-15.pdf

Program Options for ELLs/MLLs. (n.d.). New York State Education Department. Retrieved September 28, 2020, from http://www.nysed.gov/bilingual-ed/program-options-english-language-learnersmultilingual-learners