Touro College TESOL Candidate Michael Kollmer on Program Options for English Language Learners

I believe that online discussion forums for fully online courses enable our candidates to participate in flexible and independent learning, construct peer-to-peer learning networks, create deeper knowledge construction and help develop critical thinking skills.  Touro TESOL candidate Michael Kollmer’s contribution shows the depth of his engagement with the module materials. 

I believe that online discussion forums for fully online courses enable our candidates to participate in flexible and independent learning, construct peer-to-peer learning networks, create deeper knowledge construction and help develop critical thinking skills.  Touro TESOL candidate Michael Kollmer’s contribution shows the depth of his engagement with the module materials.

Michael Kollmer received his bachelor’s degree at SUNY Cortland in Physical Education. Currently, he is enrolled as a graduate student to pursue his Masters in TESOL at Touro College. “This is my first year working as a physical education teacher in an elementary school and I plan on taking what I learn at Touro and applying my knowledge into my lessons to ensure all my students have the greatest opportunity to learn.”

1. In NYS, what are the Program Options for English Language Learners/Multilingual Learners?

Within NYS there are a few different program options that are out there for English Language Learners/Multilingual Learners. The first option that NYS offers is the Bilingual Educational. Bilingual Education is broken down into four different categories that consist of Transitional Bilingual Education, Dual Language, One-Way Dual Language, and Two-Way Dual Language Program. The Transitional Bilingual Education program offers students of the same home language the opportunity to learn to speak, understand, read, and write in English while continuing to learn academic content in their home language. The goal of TBE is to provide students with the opportunity to transition to a monolingual English classroom setting without additional support once they reach proficiency (Department, 2019). The second program that is offered is the Dual Language Program. Dual Language programs seek to offer students the opportunity to become bilingual, bi-literate, and bicultural while improving their academic ability. Students learn to speak, read, and write in two languages, and also learn about other cultures while developing strong self-esteem and diverse language skills (Department, 2019). The next program is One-Way Dual Language. In the One-Way Dual Language program model, students who come from the same primary or home language and or background have the opportunity to be bilingual or multilingual (Department, 2019). Lastly, the Two-Way Dual Language program includes both native English speakers and ELLs. The teacher provides instruction in both English and the home or primary language. The goal is for the students to develop literacy and proficiency in English and in the home language (Department, 2019). The other program option is English as a New Language. Within the ENL program, language arts and content-area instruction are taught in English using specific instructional strategies (Department, 2019).

2. Name the five different models currently in use that integrate language and content instruction – refer to Celce-Murcia Unit III readings.

The five different models currently in use that integrate language and content instruction are the Total Immersion Model, Partial Immersion Model, Sheltered Model, Adjunct Model, and the Theme-Based Model. For the Total Immersion Model, English speaking students receive the majority of their schooling through the usage of their second language. This model is one of the most carefully researched language programs and by the end of elementary school students become functioning bilinguals (Celce-Murcia, 2001). In the Partial Immersion Model, students usually spend half of their time speaking in English and the other half of the time speaking in

the target language to teach academic content (Celce-Murcia, 2001). The Sheltered Model separates the second/foreign language speakers from the native speakers of the target language (Celce-Murcia, 2001). The Adjunct Model is a content-based approach in which the students are simultaneously in a language class and a content class (Celce-Murcia, 2001). In Theme-Based Model, the teacher selects themes or topics, provides content from which teachers extract language learning activities (Celce-Murcia, 2001).

3. Name the model that you use most and why.

Personally, being a physical education teacher, I do not use any of these models when I am teaching in the gym. However, the district that I work for uses the Sheltered Model. Within the elementary building for the ELL students, they are separated and placed in their own classrooms. They do this to allow the ELLs to have the extra time for classwork, giving them more time to practice and progress their English language.

4. Gather some information on student assessment from your school district. What kinds of student assessments are regularly administered, and in what language? If the district includes non-native speakers of English, are testing and assessment requirements modified or altered in any way to accommodate them? If so, how?

Within my school district assessments are given as the day goes on whether it is in the form of formal assessments consisting of quizzes, tests, or writing assignments or informal assessments such as checking over classwork to make sure that the student understands the lesson that is being taught. These assessments are made many times throughout the day to make sure that the students are keeping up with the pace of the class and to help students if you realize they are not understanding a lesson or are falling behind. These assessments tend to be given in English, however for the students whose native language is not English, the assessment is given to them in their native language. Such as tests printed in a language that they are comfortable working with alongside of an English copy.

5. What is the purpose of Commissioner’s Regulations – Sections 117 http://www.p12.nysed.gov/sss/lawsregs/117-1-3.html(Links to an external site.) (Links to an external site.)

The purpose of Commissioner’s Regulations is to establish standards for the screening of every new applicant to the schools to determine which students could possibly be gifted, have or are suspected of having a disability, or are limited in the English language (NYSED, 2010). These regulations allow for the students to get the services that they need in order for them to have an equal education as their peers.

6. How do the BLUEPRINT FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNER/MULTILINGUAL LEARNER (ELL/MLL) SUCCESS http://www.nysed.gov/common/nysed/files/nys-blueprint-for-ell-success.pdf (Links to an external site) and CR Part 154 Comprehensive ELL Education Plan (CEEP) and ENL staffing requirements connect with each other? http://www.nysed.gov/bilingual-ed/cr-part-154-comprehensive-ell-education-plan-ceep? (Links to an external site.) site.)http://www.nysed.gov/common/nysed/files/programs/bilingual-ed/enl-k-8-units-of-study-table-5-6-15.pdf 

The Blueprint for English Language Learners (ELL/MLL), CR Part 154 Comprehensive ELL Education Plan (CEEP) and ENL staffing requirements connect with each other because each of these plans are broken down into multiple different sections where the Local Education Agencies (LEA’s) have to outline and assess the needs of their ELLs/MLLs. They also describe their strategic plans for providing grade-appropriate, linguistically, and academically-rigorous instructions that will allow ELLs/MLLs to meet the Next Generation Learning Standards (NYSED, n.d.). This entails giving the ELLs/MLLs a safe and inclusive learning environment, high-quality supports, feedback, and human resources to ensure that the instructional plan is being correctly implemented. This also makes sure that teachers create specific content and language objectives, integrate explicit and implicit research-based vocabulary, and allow for the students to discuss content and problem-solve with peers (NYSED, 2019). Lastly, the Units of Study and Staffing Requirements also have a very detailed plan for ELLs depending on if they are stand-alone or integrated. This allows for the students to progress in a positive motion from beginning all the way to being proficient (NYSED, 2015).

References

Celce-Murcia, M. (2001). Teaching English as a Second of Foreign Language. Boston: Heinle & Heinle.

Department, N. Y. (2019). Program Options for English Language Learners/Multilingual Learners. Retrieved from Bilingual Education & English as a New Language: http://www.nysed.gov/bilingual-ed/program-options-english-language-learnersmultilingual-learners

NYSED. (2010, March 31). Commissioner’s Regulations. Retrieved from Student Support Services: http://www.p12.nysed.gov/sss/lawsregs/117-1-3.html#content_column

NYSED. (2015, May 6). CR Part 154-2 (K-8) English as a New Language (ENL) Units of Study and Staffing Requirements. Retrieved from NYSED.

NYSED. (2019). CR Part 154 Comprehensive ELL Education Plan (CEEP). Retrieved from Bilingual Education & English as a New Language: http://www.nysed.gov/bilingual-ed/cr-part-154-comprehensive-ell-education-plan-ceep

NYSED. (n.d.). Blueprint for English Language Learner/Multilingual Learner Success. Retrieved from NYSED: http://www.nysed.gov/common/nysed/files/nys-blueprint-for-ell-success.pdf

Author: drcowinj

As an Assistant Professor for TESOL and Bilingual Programs at Touro College, Graduate School of Education Dr. Cowin’s focus is on the Responsibility to Touro Students (Teaching), Responsibility to the Discipline (Scholarship), Responsibility to Touro College and Community (Service). Dr. Cowin strives to inspire students to be creative and to model the love of lifelong learning by inculcating the habits and attitudes that create agile mindsets. 21st-century learning extends well beyond the classroom, and Dr. Cowin incorporates takes full advantage of online learning technologies for L2 language acquisition and current global trends in teaching English as a Second Language She represents high levels of scholarship and participates fully in the larger world of TESOL academic discipline. Ongoing research, expressed in scholarly contributions to the advancement of knowledge is demonstrated through publication, presentation and participation in academic conferences, articles in Education Update, blogging and other scholarly activities, including public performances or exhibitions at conferences and workshops such as the Plekhanov University of Economics keynote address in 2018. Of special interest to her are The Blockchain of Things and its implications for Higher Education, Current Global Trends in Teaching English; Developing Materials and Resources in Teaching English – Methodology; E-learning & Micro-Methodology in Teaching English; and E-Resources Discovery and Analysis.

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