Dr. Jasmin Bey Cowin

Currently, I am the Chief Marketing Officer for a start-up IT company, PeopleMovers®, a Community Networking Platform. As an experienced executive, both at a strategic and operational level, with strong track record in developing, driving and managing business improvement and development, change management and turn-around I worked with value-adding leadership. The main drivers have been branding, marketing and efficiency, improved customer satisfaction and retainment, customer service, product management, cross functional business improvements and development of sponsor presentations with sponsor meetings.

The Presidency of the Rotary Club of New York is dear to my heart. As the second woman to be elected in 109 years, I have a leadership role in shaping and directing the club’s programs and international strategic alliances. Part of this volunteer leadership position centers around cooperation and collaboration to do “Service above Self.” The Rotary network encompasses more than 1.3 million members worldwide. Currently, I am working on our International Breakfast Lecture series at the United Nations and a Harvey Relief event to increase visibility of the club’s Rotary branding. The International Breakfast Series is streamed live on Facebook with an audience of 5000+ international viewers. In addition, I am the US Ambassador of the Hepatitis Zero Campaign, a worldwide campaign for which I am part of the Media relations team. Through my volunteer position as the President of the Rotary Club of New York and host mother to international students from South Korea, Venezuela, Brazil, Saudi Arabia, Belgium, France, China, Kazakhstan, and Italy I am extremely knowledgeable about cultural differences and sensitivities, team work, plus meaningful cooperation and collaboration within a team structure. Due to my Rotary position, there is a strong national and international network available for outreach.

As a University Pathway facilitator at EF – Education First, I conceived, designed and developed multiple portfolios of face-to-face, online and blended curricula across a variety of disciplines. For EF’s Russian branch I hold interactive Adobe Connect webinars for Russian ESL university faculty at academic institutions such as Moscow University, St. Petersburg, and Siberia with practical applicability into real-life teaching scenarios. I successfully designed, implemented and taught 21st Century courses for international students which focused on educational technology literacy, assessments, activity paths, learning objectives and content for each course with a 100% paper-free learning environment. Excellent student participation and student ratings for my courses were achieved through online collaborative tools.

Realizing that Educational and Instructional Technology are pivotal in today’s fast changing education environment I completed this August a Masters Degree in Educational Technology at the Marlboro School of Graduate and Professional Studies, Vermont, with a GPA of 4.0. During my time at Marlboro College, I studied, analyzed and applied pedagogical best practices and supporting media and educational technologies needed to successfully execute online, f2f and blended learning and marketing environments.

I am a Fulbright Scholar, who holds a Doctorate in Education from Columbia University and a Masters in Educational Technology.

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Saftey Procedures

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Carbon Monoxide, an odorless deadly gas, can cause illness, permanent health damage, and death. It is formed by the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels such as gas, coal, wood, and oil. Carbon monoxide is absorbed via the lungs into the bloodstream, where it replaces oxygen.

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning First Aid
Persons who are affected by inhalation of carbon monoxide contaminated air must be seen by a physician as soon as possible.
Until the affected person is receiving care from a qualified medical practitioner the following treatment should be administered:
Move the patient to fresh air and loosen clothing
Open all windows

If unconscious:
Call 911
If breathing stopped: Begin CPR at once

If conscious:
Avoid unnecessary exertion
Call 911 or Go to emergency room

Burning Fuels Safely:
Use fire-resistant materials on walls around wood stores.
Never use flammable liquids to start a fire.
Use only seasoned hardwood. Soft, moist wood accelerates creosote residue which sticks to the inner walls of the chimney. Creosote is a fire hazard and can cause a chimney fire.
Never burn cardboard boxes, trash or debris in your fireplace or wood stove
When building a fire, place logs at the rear of the fireplace on an adequate supporting grate
Never leave a fire in the fireplace unattended. Extinguish the fire before going to bed or leaving the house.
Soak hot ashes in water and place them in a metal container outside your house.

Safety Checklist:
Have a Carbon Monoxide alarm in your home.
Proper ventilation is the key.
Always use the right fuel.
Never leave an open fire unattended without a fireguard.
Always use a securely fitted fireguard when children are in the house.
Have your chimney cleaned once a year by a certified chimney sweeper.

Troubleshooting
If your appliance starts burning slowly, goes out frequently or if you smell or suspect fumes you should:
Open doors and windows.
Carefully put out the fire, or allow it to burn itself out.
Do not stay in the room any longer than necessary.
Do not attempt to relight the appliance until a professional has checked it.
NOTE: Overloading the fireplace with wood in an attempt to get a longer burn time contributes to creosote buildup.

TAKE THE QUIZ: Carbon Monoxide Poisoning and your Saftey

 

What is a Pandemic?

 

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What is a Pandemic?

All pandemics have the potential to cause serious illness, death, and large-scale social and economic disruption.The flu (influenza) is a highly contagious illness caused by influenza viruses infecting nose, throat, and lungs. There are two main factors used to determine the impact of a pandemic. The first is the seriousness of illness associated with infection. The second factor is how easily the pandemic virus spreads from person-to-person.

 

How does infection happen?

When people with a flu cough, sneeze or talk tiny droplets, loaded with the flu virus, escape. These droplets can fly far land settle on nearby people. Droplets loaded with the flu virus also land on objects and a person might also get flu by touching a surface or object that has flu virus on it and then touching their own mouth, eyes or their nose. Since flu is an airborne virus, meaning it can be transmitted through the air, it is especially contagious.

 

How long can you infect someone?
You can infect others before know you are sick and while you are sick. Infecting others starts 1 day before symptoms develop and up to 5 to 7 days after becoming sick. Some people, especially young children and people with weakened immune systems, might be able to infect others for an even longer time. Symptoms begin in about 1 to 4 days, with an average of about 2 days.

 

Complications of Flu
Complications of flu can include bacterial pneumonia, ear infections, sinus infections, dehydration, and worsening of chronic medical conditions, such as congestive heart failure, asthma, or diabetes.

 

Who is at high risk getting the flu?
Anyone can get the flu. At higher risk are people 65 years and older, anyone in a long-term care facility, anyone with certain chronic medical conditions, such as asthma, diabetes, heart disease, cancer patients, HIV-positive patients, Lupus and any other autoimmune compromised person, pregnant women, people with body mass index (BMI) of 40 or greater, American Indian or Alaska Natives and young children.

 

Symptoms

People who have the flu often feel some or all of these signs and symptoms:

  • Fever* or feeling feverish/chills
  • Cough
  • Sore throat
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headaches
  • Fatigue (very tired)
  • Some people may have vomiting and diarrhea, though this is more common in children than adults

*It’s important to note that not everyone with flu will have a fever

 

Flu prevention

  • Get a flu shot. It’s the No. 1 thing you can do to prevent the flu
  • Wash your hands a lot. If you come in contact with people who are contagious, you have to wash your hands with soap. To completely get rid of viruses from your skin, you need to scrub hard for 20 seconds or more. A good way to time yourself is to sing “Happy Birthday” twice while scrubbing the backs of your hands, between your fingers, and under your nails. It doesn’t matter if the water’s hot or cold, the very act of scrubbing will physically remove the germs.
  • Use alcohol-based hand sanitizer on your hands as that kills cold and flu germs. Spread the sanitizer over the front, back and between the fingers and nails of your hand.
  • Avoid getting close to people who are sick.  Don’t stand close to someone who is ill and avoid shaking hands
  • Keep your surroundings clean, do not share dishes, glasses and wash clothing, bedspreads, and towels of sick family members.
  • Household, social and workplace viral touchpoints

Biggest Challenges

    • Shared dishes at a bar such as candy, peanut or chip bowls – DO NOT touch or eat from those
    • Dirty doorknobs and touch points – wipe frequently with disinfectant, especially when entering and leaving bathrooms
    • Germy linens, couch pillows, and throws – wash and dry
    • Used dishes, toothbrushes, and tissues – DO NOT share, discard tissues immediately and don’t touch them – they are loaded with the virus

Use:

    • Disinfecting spray
    • Rubbing alcohol
    • Washer, dryer
    • Household bleach
    • Dishwasher

Flu Infographic Cowin

Take the Quiz and check your knowledge!

The Flu and You